Japanese

Justice Studies


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Japanese

Department of Foreign Languages, Literatures and Cultures

JAPN 101-102. Elementary Japanese.
4 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring.
The fundamentals of Japanese through listening, speaking, reading and writing. Practice in pronunciation and development of comprehension. One hour of work each week in the language laboratory.

JAPN 231-232. Intermediate Japanese.
3 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring.
A thorough review of grammar, vocabulary building, conversation, composition and reading. Prerequisite: One year of college Japanese or equivalent.

JAPN 300. Japanese Grammar and Communication.
3 credits.
Intensive training in grammatical structures and their application to oral and written communication. Instruction is in Japanese. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirements for possible international affairs majors and/or IBUS majors. Prerequisite: JAPN 232 or permission of the instructor.


Justice Studies

Department of Justice Studies

JUST 100. Justice Studies Proseminar.
1 credit. Offered fall and spring.
This course is designed to introduce students to the justice studies major by focusing on academic and career advisement. Topics will include: how to select a meaningful program of study, defining and pursuing advanced research projects, identifying and arranging internships, finding and using literature in justice related academic fields, and anticipating a career in justice related fields. Prerequisites: JUST 200 and admission to the justice studies major.

JUST 200. Introduction to Justice Studies.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course offers students an introduction to the field of justice studies. It includes an examination of moral, philosophical and political definitions of justice and injustice and a history of their development; the distinctions and commonalities between various "kinds" of justice, e.g., criminal social, environmental; a discussion of classic and contemporary theorists and practitioners of justice and their impact on societal understanding of the concepts of justice and injustice. Prerequisites: Declaration of justice-preparation.

JUST 201. Justice Research Methods.
4 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course provides students with the tools necessary for conducting independent research in the area of justice studies. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are covered. A term project, in which the skills covered in the course are applied, is a significant part of the class. Prerequisites: JUST 200 and MATH 220.

JUST 210. Crime and Criminal Justice.
3 credits. Offered once a year.
This course provides an introduction to the nature of the crime problem in the United States, including patterns of victimization and offending and the ways in which the criminal justice system responds to these behaviors. Prerequisites: JUST 200 and admission to the major.

JUST 212. Theories of Crime and Criminal Justice.
3 credits. Offered once a year.
This course provides an in-depth exploration of theoretical perspectives pertaining to the two central realms of criminological inquiry: crime and the response to crime (criminal justice). Both classic and contemporary perspectives are examined. The course will examine why people commit crime, why crime occurs, why it differs across groups and the objective underlying crime control policy. Prerequisite: JUST 200.

JUST 221. Social Justice Theories.
3 credits. Offered once a year.
This course serves as a theoretical introduction to the social justice track of the justice studies major. It includes an examination of the major concepts regarding inequality. How do we define and create inequality? Can we rid ourselves of inequality or should we accept it as a necessary element in society? Prerequisite: JUST 200.

JUST 223. Social Justice Interventions and Policies.
3 credits. Offered once a year.
This class provides a review of the general structures of American social justice interventions and policies including governmental, corporate and not-for-profit organizations. Emphasis will be placed on macro-structures such as entitlement programs and micro-structures such as neighborhood and grassroots organizations. Prerequisite: JUST 200.

GJUST 225. Justice and American Society.
4 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course introduces the student to the concept and reality of justice in America. It is a broad-based, interdisciplinary consideration of justice: What it is, what it means, and how it intersects with society and social institutions in American. Philosophical and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of justice and the historical context of justice in American society will be considered.

JUST 235. Justice in the Global Community.
3 credits. Offered once a year.
A survey of different definitions of justice relating to the operation and development of a global community in international affairs. Prerequisite: JUST 200 or permission of instructor.

JUST/PSYC 255. Abnormal Psychology for Law Enforcement Personnel.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course for students interested in becoming law enforcement professionals critically examines psychological normality and abnormality. The course focuses on description and causes of abnormal behavior likely to be encountered by law enforcement professionals and on intervention options for police officers. May not be taken by psychology majors or students who have completed PSYC 250 or PSYC 335. Prerequisites: GPSYC 101 and JUST 200.

JUST 300. Perspectives on Comparative Justice.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course provides an overview of various systems of justice existent in different cultures throughout the globe. The emphasis is on legal systems and the ways in which they are used to promote – or not promote – justice. Includes a discussion of such topics as war, peace, terrorism, political and social oppression, and the ways in which these phenomena are either created by or ameliorated by justice systems. Prerequisites: JUST 200 and admission to the major.

JUST 301. Special Topics in Justice Studies.
3 credits. Offered spring.
This course provides an examination of topics that are of current interest in the field of justice studies. The class may be repeated for credit when course content changes. Prerequisites: JUST 200 and admission to the major.

JUST/PSYC 314. Police Psychology.
3 credits. Offered once every other year.
This course explores the role of psychology in various aspects of police work and examines how psychological research and methods can assist police departments and police officers in reaching law-enforcement goals. Prerequisites: GPSYC 101 and JUST 200.

JUST 315. Mental Illness and the Criminal Justice System.
3 credits. Offered once a year.
This course introduces students to a growing crisis facing the U.S. criminal justice system: the growing numbers of mentally ill offenders in the criminal justice system. Following a consideration of the needs of individuals with mental illness, the course focuses on the treatment and management of mentally ill offenders at each stage of the criminal justice system, from initial contact with law enforcement to re-entry into the community.

JUST/PSYC 316. Human Development and Crime.
3 credits. Offered once a year.
This course examines how psychological research and theory shed light on the development of criminal careers, the factors that protect children and adolescents from becoming criminals, how being a victim of crime influences well being, and the efficacy of rehabilitation. Special attention will be paid to the knowledge base on delinquency and childhood/adolescent victimization. Prerequisite: GPSYC 101.

JUST 317. Victimization of Children.
3 credits. Offered once a year.
This course provides an overview of patterns, causes and remedies for the various victimizations of children in the United States and throughout the world (abductions, child abuse, sexual exploitation, etc.).

JUST 318. Sex Offenders.
3 credits. Offered once a year.
This course is designed to introduce to the issue of sex offenders in society. Students will consider sexual values in American society and how they relate to the development, thought patterns, and behavior of individuals who sexually violate others. Students will learn about theories of sex offending, the effects of sex offending on victims and society, and strategies for treating and managing sex offenders.

JUST 319. Psychopathology and Crime.
3 credits. Offered once a year.
This course introduces students to various types of psychopathology, including state disorders, personality disorders, and organic mental disorders, as they relate to different types of crimes. Students consider the concept of abnormality, as viewed by society and the criminal justice system.

JUST 322. Understanding Violence.
3 credits. Offered once a year.
This course examines violence in its many forms and provides a theoretical and conceptual foundation for understanding what it is, why it happens, and how it might be prevented or diminished. Structural, institutional and interpersonal forms of violence are examined as are theoretical perspectives focusing on the individual, socio-structural and cultural levels of explanation.

JUST 323. Comparative Criminal Justice.
3 credits. Offered once a year.
A comparative study of criminal justice systems derived from the major world legal systems. The relevant background factors, government, laws, law enforcement, courts, corrections, youthful offenders are examined in each representative country studied. Multinational criminal justice organizations and special issues are addressed.

JUST 324. Death Penalty.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course provides students with a broad survey of the death penalty as a penal sanction and the controversies and issues which surround it. Key topical areas covered are history and foundations, legal landscape, execution and death penalty processes, contemporary issues including innocence, cost, discrimination and deterrence, and perspectives and voices surrounding the death penalty.

JUST/SOCI 326. Victimology.
3 credits. Offered every two years.
This course provides an overview of various perspectives (social, psychology, legal, etc.) on the experience of victimization. Explanations of the phenomenon are discussed in the context of responses to various types of victimization.

JUST 327. Criminal Law.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of substantive criminal law including common law sources and elements of various criminal offenses, justifications and defenses.

JUST 329. Perspectives on Law.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
In this course, a broad array of perspectives on law and legal processes in the United States are examined. Students will examine perspectives from the realms of jurisprudence, philosophy, sociology, psychology, economics, anthropology and literature among others and will consider the intersection of these realms with law, legal processes, legal evolution and development, and the legal professions.

JUST/SOCI/SOWK 330. Corrections.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The history, philosophy, policies and problems of the treatment of violators by the police, courts and correctional institutions.

JUST/POSC 331. Human Rights in Theory and Practice.
3 credits. Offered once a year.
This course will explore the nature and value of human rights by investigating some major debates over their status and meaning and by examining some of the ways people have tried to secure human rights in practice. Prerequisites: JUST, POSC and INTA majors only. For JUST majors, the completion of JUST 200 is a prerequisite.

JUST/SCOM 333. Negotiations.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Provides an overview of negotiation as a strategy for dealing with conflict.

JUST/WMST 341. Gender and Justice.
3 credits. Offered fall.
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the causes, structure and consequences of gender oppression. Consistent with the social justice track of the major, notions of fairness, justice and equality with respect to gendered social, political and economic relations will be examined.

JUST 345. Restorative Justice.
3 credits. Offered every other year.
In this course, the restorative justice paradigm will be examined at multiple levels including consideration in the international, local community, and criminal justice contexts. Both the underlying principles and practical applications of restorative justice will be explored. The related concept of community justice will also be addressed.

JUST/POSC 372. Ethics and International Politics.
3 credits. Offered fall.
This course investigates the significance of ethical questions in the theory and practice of contemporary international politics, introducing a variety of normative approaches that shape the issues of peace and conflict, morality and justice in global affairs. Practical case studies will also be used to address issues of policy relevance, with particular attention paid to the American experience. Prerequisites: JUST, POSC and INTA majors only. For JUST majors, the completion of JUST 235 is a prerequisite.

JUST 375. Genocide in the 20th Century.
3 credits. Offered spring.
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the various definitions, causes, and structure and consequences of genocide. We will study some of the major 20th century genocides (Indigenous peoples, Armenia, USSR, Jewish Holocaust, Cambodia, Bosnia/Kosovo, Rwanda and Darfur) using the following conceptual schemes: social death, structured violence, oppression and mass murder.

JUST 377. Global Futures.
3 credits. Offered spring.
Explores possible future directions that the global system may take in selected issue areas such as energy, democratization, food supplies, and infectious diseases. Emphasis is on active learning strategies, introducing the analytical tools used for analysis of international trends and addressing questions of how to respond in a manner that promotes global justice.

JUST/POSC 392. Peace Studies.
3 credits. Offered spring.
A study of the evolution, theory and practice of peace studies. The course focuses on how we wage and resolve conflict, how we affect social change, and how we provide for security through nonviolent means.

JUST 400. Senior Seminar in Justice Studies.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The capstone course for the justice studies major. Students are expected to enter JUST 400 with a proposed area of study and will spend the semester in developing a thesis. Class discussion and review of individual projects along with oral presentation of work are integral parts of the course. Students are expected to produce a piece of original scholarship related to their study in the major. Prerequisites: JUST 200, JUST 201, admission to the major and senior standing.

JUST 401. Internship in Justice Studies.
4 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course allows students to receive academic credit for work experienced in an agency or organization related to the justice studies major. Students should consult the justice studies director for assistance in arranging approved internships. Prerequisites: JUST 200 and JUST 201. Successful completion of four additional justice studies courses.

JUST 402. Advanced Research in Justice Studies.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course is designed to give students a context in which to pursue advanced research in a justice studies context. It is especially appropriate for students interested in graduate study in the field. Prerequisites: JUST 200 and JUST 201. Successful completion of four additional justice studies courses.

JUST 499. Honors.
6 credits.
Year course. An independent research topic initiated and completed by qualified majors wishing to graduate with distinction.

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