General Education

Interdisciplinary Programs

Academic Units

Academic Programs

Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Dr. H.B. Cavalcanti, Head

Sociology Program Coordinator
Dr. Joe Spear
Location: Sheldon Hall, Room 210
Phone: (540) 568-2347
E-mail: spearjh@jmu.edu
Web site: www.jmu.edu/sociology

Anthropology Program Coordinator
Dr. Clarence Geir
Location: Sheldon Hall, Room 205
Phone: (540) 568-6973
E-mail: geiercr@jmu.edu
Web site: www.jmu.edu/sociology

[Printable Version]

Professors
T. Carter, H. Cavalcanti, C. Geier, L.A. Lewis

Associate Professors
B. Bryson, B. Eck, N. Imani, F. Linder, J. Spear

Assistant Professors
B. Brewer, L. Buckley, L. Harlacker, A. Paugh, S. Poulson, C. Robinson, J. Rumbo, P. Schoenemann, J. Solometo

Mission Statement Mission Statement
Career Opportunities and Marketable Skills Career Opportunities and Marketable Skills
Co-curricular Activities and Organizations Co-curricular Activities and Organizations
Degree and Major Requirements Degree Requirements
Concentrations Concentrations
Recommended Schedule for Majors Minor Requirements
Minor Requirements Credit by Examination
Credit by Examination  


Sociology Program

Mission Statement
The mission of the sociology program is to develop students' ability to analyze the social world by using sociological theories and research methods that stress the importance of social, cultural and historical contexts for understanding relationships between social actors and structures.

This primary goal is accomplished by a curriculum organized around three sociological traditions (naturalistic, interpretive and critical paradigms), each providing different theoretical and methodological perspectives.

Goals
To fulfill its mission, the sociology program cultivates the sociological imagination by:

Career Opportunities and Marketable Skills
Working as a professional sociologist most often requires a graduate degree, but the following careers, some supplemented with collateral training, are representative of our previous graduates.
A major in sociology provides skills and perspectives that enhance all careers. Students who study sociology gain:
Co-curricular Activities and Organizations
Degree and Major Requirements
Admission to the Sociology Major
Students who meet the following requirements will be admitted to the Sociology Program as a major:

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology
Degree Requirements

Required Courses
Credit Hours
General Education1
41
Foreign Language classes(intermediate level required)2
0-14
Philosophy course (in addition to General Education courses)
3
University electives
23-37
Major requirements (listed below) and electives
40

 
120

1 The General Education program contains a set of requirements each student must fulfill. The number of credit hours necessary to fulfill these requirements may vary.
2 The foreign language requirement may be satisfied by successful completion of the second semester of the intermediate level of the student's chosen language (typically 232) or by placing out of that language through the Department of Foreign Language's placement test.


Major Requirements
To earn the B.A. degree with a sociology major, students must complete a minimum of 40 credit hours in sociology. Of these credit hours, 19 are required courses; the remaining 21 credit hours are electives chosen from over 30 sociology courses.

Courses
Credit Hours
SOCI 200. Development of Social Thought and Method
4
SOCI 331. Introduction to Social Statistics1
3
SOCI 380. Critical Analysis
3
SOCI 382. Interpretive Analysis
3
SOCI 384. Naturalistic Analysis
3
SOCI 480. Senior Seminar2
3
Sociology electives
21

 
40

1 Students can substitute SOCI 331 with MATH 220, PSYC 210 or COB 191, if SPSS is used in the course, but must take an additional sociology course to complete the required 40 hours of sociology.
2 This course fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major.


Bachelor of Science in Sociology
Degree Requirements

Required Courses
Credit Hours
General Education1
41
Quantitative requirement2
3
Scientific Literacy requirement2
3-4
University electives
32-33
Major requirements (listed below)
40

 
120

1 The General Education program contains a set of requirements each student must fulfill. The number of credit hours necessary to fulfill these requirements may vary.
2 In addition to course work taken to fulfill General Education requirement.


Major Requirements
To earn the B.S. degree with a sociology major, students must complete a minimum of 40 credit hours in sociology. Of these credit hours, 19 are required courses; the remaining 21 credit hours are electives chosen from over 30 sociology courses.

Courses
Credit Hours
SOCI 200. Development of Social Thought and Method
4
SOCI 331. Social Statistics1
3
SOCI 380. Critical Analysis
3
SOCI 382. Interpretive Analysis
3
SOCI 384. Naturalistic Analysis
3
SOCI 480. Senior Seminar2
3
Sociology electives
21

 
40

1 Students can substitute SOCI 331 with MATH 220, PSYC 210 or COB 191, if SPSS is used in the course, but must take an additional sociology course to complete the required 40 hours of sociology.
2 This course fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major.


Concentrations
The sociology program encourages majors to select electives that create a coherent program of study suited to their special needs and interests. Such a focus would involve four or more courses that share a common focus. With the assistance of his or her sociology adviser, a student may choose an appropriate set of classes to form a concentration. Students in the past have developed such focused inquiries in areas such as applied sociology, deviance and criminology, family and lifestyles, occupations and bureaucracy, social psychology, sociology of education, and multicultural experience.

Recommended Schedule for Majors
The following is an example of a four year course of study for a student seeking a degree in sociology:

First Year
Credit Hours
SOCI 101. Introductory Sociology, or
3
GSOCI 210. Social Issues in a Global Context,
OR GSOCI 240. Individual in Society(prerequisite for SOCI 200)
SOCI 200. Development of Social Thought and Method
4
Sociology Elective
3

 
10

Second Year
Credit Hours
SOCI 331. Social Statistics
3
Sociology Electives
6

 
9

Third Year
Credit Hours
Choose two of the following:
6
     SOCI 380. Critical Analysis
     SOCI 382. Interpretive Analysis
     SOCI 384. Naturalistic Analysis
Electives
6

 
12

Fourth Year
Credit Hours
Choose one of the following:
3
     SOCI 380. Critical Analysis
     SOCI 382. Interpretive Analysis
     SOCI 384. Naturalistic Analysis
Sociology Electives
3
SOCI 480. Senior Seminar (majors take this during their final semester at JMU)
3
 

 
9

Minor Requirements

Sociology Minor
To minor in sociology, a student must complete a minimum of 18 credit hours of sociology course work including four core credit hours and 14 elective credit hours.

Core Requirements
Credit Hours
SOCI 200. Development of Social Thought and Method
4
Sociology electives
14

 
18

Credit by Examination
Consult the department head for information about credit by examination.

Anthropology Program

Mission Statement
Anthropology is unique among the social sciences in that it celebrates humans as biological organisms and as innovative, creative, culture-bearing beings. Through course work, field schools, study abroad, independent studies and internships, students learn about cultural, linguistic, and biological diversity, human biological characteristics, and the human past as revealed by archaeology. The anthropology program provides globally-oriented courses that stress critical thinking, method and theory, gathering and interpreting data, intensive reading and writing, hands-on learning, and the research methods and techniques used by anthropologists to understand contemporary human problems.

Goals
The anthropology program has the following goals:

Career Opportunities and Marketable Skills
An undergraduate degree in Anthropology provides a solid foundation for a wide range of rewarding careers. Students with a B.A. or B.S. degree in anthropology have gone on to become:
The anthropology major is a liberal arts program that stresses such marketable skills as:
Co-curricular Activities and Organizations
Degree Requirements
Required Courses
Credit Hours
General Education1
41
Foreign Language classes (intermediate level required)2
0-14
Philosophy course (in addition to General Education courses)
3
University electives (beyond major)
25-39
Major requirements (listed below)
40-41

 
120

1 The General Education program contains a set of requirements each student must fulfill. The number of credit hours necessary to fulfill these requirements may vary.
2 The foreign language requirement may be satisfied by successful completion of the second semester of the intermediate level of the student's chosen language (typically 232) or by placing out of that language through the Department of Foreign Languages, Literatures and Cultures' placement test.


Bachelor of Science in Anthropology

Degree Requirements

Required Courses
Credit Hours
General Education1
41
Quantitative requirement2
3
Scientific Literacy requirement2
3-4
University electives
35-36
Major requirements (listed below) and electives
40-41

 
120

1 The General Education program contains a set of requirements each student must fulfill. The number of credit hours necessary to fulfill these requirements may vary.
2 MATH 220, Statistics, is strongly recommended for those students who have not taken that course or an equivalent as part of their General Education.


Major Requirements
To earn a B.A. or B. S. degree in anthropology, students complete 40-41 credit hours in the major. Given the diverse opportunities the discipline provides, the major is designed to allow students the opportunity to work closely with their advisors to develop a curriculum appropriate to their personal and professional interests. Those students wishing to do so may elect to pursue a concentration in one of the three sub-disciplines of cultural, biological or archaeological anthropology. The concentrations guide students in choosing courses to enhance opportunities for graduate school or allow them to pursue an area of personal interest within the larger discipline of anthropology. Up to two elective courses from a discipline outside of anthropology may be applied to the major. Elective courses from outside of the program must be approved by the student's adviser and must be at the 300- or 400-level. Students must receive at least a "C-" in a class to have it count toward the major.

Required Courses
Credit Hours
GANTH 195. Cultural Anthropology
3
GANTH 196. Biological Anthropology
3
ANTH 197. Archaeology
3
ANTH 375. History of Theory in Sociocultural Anthropology1
3
One methods from the following:
3-4
     ANTH 435. Ethnographic Genres and Methods
     ANTH 410. Spatial Analysis for Anthropologists
     ANTH 420. Evolution of Human Behavior
     ANTH 455. Archaeology: Methods of Analysis and Interpretation
One elective from each of the following: cultural anthropology,
9
  biological anthropology and archaeology
Other electives2,3
15

 
40-41

1 Students should take two of GANTH 195, GANTH 196 or ANTH197 and at least one anthropology elective before taking ANTH 375.
2 Students may take up to two adviser approved electives at the 300 or 400-level from courses outside of the program.
3 Students should consider including ANTH 305, Language and Culture, as one of their electives.

Concentrations

Cultural Anthropology
Cultural anthropology is at the core of anthropology. It provides students with in-depth experience in the interpretation and comparison of cultures. It is closely linked to the humanities and to other social sciences. Students learn what culture is, how different cultural systems and forms of social organization work, how language both reflects and constitutes culture, and methodological and theoretical frameworks for interpreting cultural differences and similarities. Students work closely with cultural anthropology faculty to choose a series of electives from both within and outside of the department to refine their own research interests. Students are encouraged (but not required) to become proficient in a foreign language beyond the level required for the B.A. and to develop a regional area of specialization through course work or a minor (e.g. Latin American studies, Africana studies, Middle Eastern studies, Asian studies). Outside upper-level electives are recommended in history, sociology, economics, religion, modern foreign languages and political science. Students are encouraged to pursue study abroad, ethnographic field school and internship opportunities.

Required Courses
Credit Hours
GANTH 195 Cultural Anthropology
3
GANTH 196 Biological Anthropology
3
ANTH 197 Archaeology
3
ANTH 201 The Discipline of Anthropology
1
ANTH 375 History of Theory in Sociocultural Anthropology1
3
ANTH 435 Ethnographic Genres and Methods
4
One upper-division course archaeology and biological anthropology
6
Electives2, 3
18

 
41

1 Students should take two of GANTH 195, GANTH 196 or ANTH 197 and at least one anthropology elective before taking ANTH 375.
2 Students may take up to two adviser approved electives at the 300 or 400 level from courses outside of the program.
3 Suggested electives include: ANTH 305, Language and Culture; area studies courses such as ANTH 265, Peoples and Cultures of Latin America and the Caribbean, ANTH 312, Native Americans, ANTH 280, Peoples and Cultures of Sub Saharan Africa, ANTH 380, Chinese Culture and Society; and upper-division courses addressing topical issues which are generally more theoretically intensive such as ANTH 390,  Topics in Cultural Studies, ANTH 313, Culture Process and Change, ANTH 323, Visual Anthropology, ANTH 340, The Idea of Race, ANTH 370, Topics in the Anthropology of Gender, and ANTH 395, Special Topics. Students are encouraged to pursue study abroad, ethnographic field school and internship opportunities.


Archaeology
Archaeology is the study of the development and change of human societies from the prehistoric past to the present through the identification, gathering and interpretation of material remains and/or artifacts. While a major contributor to biological anthropology and forensics, archaeology is most closely tied to cultural anthropology and has been described as cultural anthropology in the past tense. As a major contributor to the emerging discipline of historical archaeology, the field has strong ties to the practice of history. Students planning a career in archaeology should enroll in an archaeological field school. Those interested in historical archaeology should consider the interdisciplinary historical archaeology minor. Archaeology students are also encouraged to take ANTH 435, Ethnographic Genres and Methods. This sub-discipline shares strong methodological and thematic ties with history, geology, geography, biology and art history, and upper-level course electives from these areas are encouraged. Students are encouraged to consider co-majoring or minoring in these fields as a complement to their education.

Required Courses
Credit Hours
GANTH 195. Cultural Anthropology
3
GANTH 196. Biological Anthropology
3
ANTH 197. Archaeology
3
ANTH 201. The Discipline of Anthropology
1
ANTH 375. History of Theory in Sociocultural Anthropology1
3
ANTH 410. Spatial Analysis for Anthropologists or ANTH 4902
3-4
ANTH 455. Archaeology: Methods of Analysis and Interpretation
4
One upper division course in cultural and biological anthropology
6
One regional archaeology course (ANTH 250,324, 327, 333 etc.  )
3
Electives3, 4
11-12

 
40-41

1 Students should take two of GANTH 195, GANTH 196 or ANTH 197 and at least one anthropology elective before taking ANTH 375.
2 Instead of ANTH 410 students may take ANTH 490, Special Studies, and complete a project that requires the analysis and interpretation of archaeological data.
3 Students may take up to two adviser approved electives at the 300 or 400-level from courses outside of the program.
4 Students are encouraged to take electives from across the breadth of biological and cultural anthropology as well as archaeology. ANTH 305, Language and Culture, is strongly recommended. An archaeological field school is strongly encouraged for any students wishing to pursue professional or graduate opportunities. ANTH 435, Ethnographic Genres and Methods, is also recommended.


Biological Anthropology
The focus of biological anthropology is the study of human biology from an evolutionary perspective. Biological anthropology is interested in understanding how and why the human species became what it is today. Thus, it involves the study of human evolution, human biology and its variation, human ecology (how humans interrelate with their environment), and primate behavior and biology (to place humans in the proper comparative context). Biological anthropologists also recognize that human culture, and learned behavior in general, are fundamentally important to understanding the human condition which leads them to emphasize a bio-cultural approach in which both biology and culture are integrated into a holistic understanding of humanity. Students work closely with biological anthropology faculty to choose electives from both within and outside of the department to refine their own research and scholarly interests. Upper-level electives in biology and psychology are recommended depending on the student's particular goals. Students might consider taking a minor or second major in biology or psychology.

Required Courses
Credit Hours
GANTH 195. Cultural Anthropology
3
GANTH 196. Biological Anthropology
3
ANTH 197. Archaeology
3
ANTH 201. The Discipline of Anthropology
1
ANTH 375. History of Theory in Socio-cultural Anthropology1
3
ANTH 420. Evolution of Human Behavior
3
One upper division course in archaeology and cultural anthropology
6-7
At least two upper-level courses in biological anthropological topics2
6
Electives3, 4
12

 
40-41

1 Students should take two of GANTH 195, GANTH 196 or ANTH 197 and at least 1 Anthropology elective before taking ANTH 375.
2 Students should consider electives including ANTH 300 Anthropology of Diet and Nutrition, ANTH 315 Human Evolution, ANTH 322 Human Variation and Adaptability,   ANTH 360 Medical Anthropology, ANTH 362 Evolution of the Human Brain and any ANTH 395 Special Topics in Anthropology courses that have a biological perspective.
3 Students may take up to two adviser approved electives at the 300 or 400-level from courses outside of the program. Such courses might include BIO 290, Human Anatomy, BIO 430, Human Genetics, BIO 454, Introduction to Biometrics, BIO/PSYC 395, Comparative Animal Behavior, BIO 404, Evolutionary Analysis and PSYC 380, Cognitive Psychology.
4 Along with courses identified in 2 above, students are encouraged to take electives from across the breadth of cultural anthropology and archaeology as well as biological anthropology. ANTH 305, Language and Culture, is highly recommended.


Minor Requirements

Anthropology Minor
Students complete a minor in anthropology by completing 18 hours in anthropology including the core courses GANTH 195, Cultural Anthropology; GANTH 196, Biological Anthropology and ANTH 197, Archaeology.

Historical Archaeology Minor
The minor is designed for students interested in the field of historical archaeology, a discipline that integrates the research interests and methods of archaeology and history. For a full description of this program, refer to "Historical Archaeology".

Credit by Examination
For information about credit by examination, consult the program coordinator.

 

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