Writing

Women's Studies

Course Descriptions

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Writing

School of Writing, Rhetoric and Technical Communication


WRIT 100. Reading and Writing Workshop.
3 credits. Offered fall.
An introduction to writing process and structure in a workshop setting. This is an elective course for students who want to select an introductory-level college writing course before taking GWRIT 103.

GWRIT 103. Critical Reading and Writing.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The course emphasizes the process of constructing a focused, logical, coherent, well-supported thesis or point of view. The students will employ research and formal documentation to produce writing stylistically appropriate to its audience, purpose and occasion. The course also places emphasis on editing for clarity and control of conventions. Instruction in writing and research includes critical analysis of primary and secondary sources through a series of reading and writing assignments. Students are prepared to use reading and writing in their personal, academic and civic lives. GWRIT 103, or its equivalent, fulfills the General Education Cluster One writing requirement and is a prerequisite for all WRIT courses numbered 200 or above.

WRIT 210. Written Argumentation.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An advanced course in the development and analysis of argumentative strategies across a range of academic, professional and popular writing contexts. Emphasis will be given to classical and contemporary rhetorical theory as applied to the cultural, historical, disciplinary and professional bases for written communication. Prerequisite: GWRIT 102, GWRIT 103, or equivalent.

WRIT 220. Rhetorical Traditions.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An introduction to historical rhetoric and its relationship to reading, writing, and speaking in modern contexts. Emphasis will be placed on defining rhetoric - its traditions, terms, and enduring realms of influence. Prerequisite: GWRIT 102, GWRIT 103, or equivalent.

WRIT/ENG 290. Intermediate Composition.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course stresses the argumentative and persuasive essay as well as grammar and usage. Prerequisite: GWRIT 102, GWRIT 103, or equivalent.

WRIT 310. Studies in Literacy.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An advanced research and writing course designed to explore the important role that literacy plays in society. Students will examine the concept of literacy through historical, political, sociological, educational and cross-cultural lenses. Prerequisite: GWRIT 102, GWRIT 103 or equivalent.

WRIT 320. Writing in the Public Sphere.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Students will conduct a rhetorical examination of written texts that influenced and brought about change in the public sphere. Prerequisite: GWRIT 102, GWRIT 103, or equivalent.

WRIT 322. Making a Difference: Service Learning Writing.
3 credits. Offered fall.
Using readings and community service, this course explores political and social activism through writing and rhetoric. Combines theory and writing with hands-on projects in the community Prerequisite: GWRIT 102, GWRIT 103, or equivalent.

WRIT 330. Technology and Writing.
3 credits. Offered once a year.
An advanced research and writing course that explores the interrelationships of technology, literacy and society. Students will examine the influences of past, present and future technological innovations on our practices as readers and writers. Students may have the opportunity to compose in hypertext and multi-media environments. This course is writing-intensive. Prerequisites: GWRIT 102, GWRIT 103, or equivalent.

WRIT 340. Teaching Writing.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

The course introduces students to the major philosophies, theories, and pedagogies of teaching writing. Special attention is devoted to such practical matters as understanding and developing effective writing assignments, methods of responding to student texts-in-progress and evaluating writing. Prerequisite: GWRIT 102, GWRIT 103, or equivalent.

WRIT 345. Tutoring Writing.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This writing-intensive course integrates the theory and practice of tutoring writing in academic settings and is suited for preparing tutors and teachers who will use writing across the disciplines. The course includes an internship in a campus writing center and provides students opportunities to develop as writers, scholars and professionals. Students will be eligible for, but not guaranteed, employment in a university writing center. Prerequisites: GWRIT 102, GWRIT 103 or equivalent; WRIT 210 or WRIT 220; or permission of instructor.

WRIT/SCOM 351. Visual Rhetoric.
3 credits.
A study of the rhetorical foundations of visual and verbal arguments in academic disciplines and popular culture. Students will analyze and produce visual and verbal arguments in a variety of rhetorical contexts. Prerequisites: GWRIT 103 and any 100-level communication studies course or permission of the instructor.

WRIT 395. Internship.
1 credit repeatable up to 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Students taking this course will serve as members of the editorial staff of e-Vision, the annual online journal of first-year writing, or of Write On!, the annual university-wide writing contest. Student editors are involved in the submission, editing and publication stages of the e-Vision or Write On! production processes. Students are limited to one internship opportunity per semester. Prerequisite: GWRIT 102, GWRIT 103, or equivalent; and permission of instructor.

WRIT/ENG 396. Advanced Composition.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Extensive exercises in expository writing, with emphasis on rhetorical types of composition, designed to develop sophistication of style in the student's writing. Prerequisite: GWRIT 102, GWRIT 103, or equivalent.

WRIT 399. Independent Study in Rhetoric and Writing.
1-3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An opportunity for independent study in rhetoric and composition. In consultation with the supervising instructor, students will choose a customized course of study from a variety of topics in rhetoric and composition. Prerequisites: WRIT 210 and WRIT 220. Enrollment is contingent upon faculty and departmental approval.

WRIT 400. Special Topics Seminar in Rhetoric and Writing.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
A focused, in-depth study of specific areas or subjects in rhetoric and composition. Topics may pertain to issues relevant to the discipline, to the study of particular rhetorical theories and practices or to the study of significant figures in the field. Seminars may be repeated for credit when course content changes. Prerequisites: WRIT 210 and WRIT 220, or permission of instructor.

WRIT 410. Studies in Cultural Rhetorics.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The course will investigate the ways in which definitions of our identity (including class, gender, race and ethnicity, sexuality, nature, and religion, among others) acquire cultural significance through written and symbolic expression. Students will examine a variety of different "texts" from a range of theoretical perspectives. Prerequisites: WRIT 210 and WRIT 220, or permission of instructor.

WRIT/SCOM/WMST 420. Feminist Rhetorics.
3 credits.
Surveys key women figures in classical and contemporary rhetorical traditions and challenges the strategies used to historicize this tradition from feminist perspectives. Explores diverse feminist rhetorical discourses informed by race, sexual orientation, ethnicity and social class. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.

WRIT 430. Studies in Styles and Stylistics.
3 credits. Offered fall or spring.
An advanced writing intensive study of stylistic history, theory and practice. The course acquaints students with the origins and history of different writing styles, current stylistic theory and practice, and gives them the opportunity to write in different styles, including experimental ones. Students will analyze the relationship between rhetoric and writing style and analyze and produce stylistically diverse pieces of academic, public, and personal writing. Prerequisites: WRIT 210 and WRIT 220 or permission of instructor.

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Women's Studies

Cross Disciplinary Studies

WMST 200. Introduction to Women's Studies.
3 credits.
Cross disciplinary introduction to theories and scholarship in Women's Studies. Examines the social construction of gender, how gender affects access to opportunity, and the experiences and contributions of women throughout history. Provides a foundation for subsequent work in the Women's Studies minor.

WMST 300. Special Topics in Women's Studies.
3 credits.Offered fall and spring.
Examination of selected topics of importance to the field of women's studies.

WMST/JUST 341. Gender and Justice.
3 credits. Offered fall.
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the causes, structure and consequences of gender oppression. Consistent with the social justice track of the major, notions of fairness, justice and equality with respect to gendered social, political and economic relations will be examined.

SCOM/WMST 348. Communication and Gender.
3 credits.
Study of theories and research regarding the influence of gender in various human communication contexts, both public and private. Emphasis on the critical analysis of existing theory and empirical research and the potential competent uses of communication for social change. Prerequisite: Any 100-level GCOM course or permission of the instructor.

WMST/PHIL 350. The Philosophy of Feminism.
3 credits.
An intermediate-level examination of philosophical problems in feminist theory and feminist contributions to philosophy.

WMST/ENG 367. Women's Poetry.
3 credits.
A study of poetry by women.

WMST/ENG 368. Women's Fiction.
3 credits.
A study of novels and short stories by women.

WMST/ENG 370. Exploring Gay and Lesbian Literature.
3 credits.
An exploration of texts and issues in literature written by and about gay and lesbian writers, including critical and theoretical issues as well as questions of canon. Texts studied may include fiction, poetry, drama, essays and memoirs written primarily, but not exclusively, in the 20th century.

WMST 400. Issues and Research in Women's Studies.
3 credits.
The capstone seminar for the Women's Studies minor. Focuses on readings in feminst philosophy, history and literature. Students will engage in research in critical issues affecting women's lives. Prerequisites: WMST 200 and nine hours in the Women's Studies minor.

WMST/SCOM/WRIT 420. Feminist Rhetorics.
3 credits.
Surveys key women figures in classical and contemporary rhetorical traditions and challenges the strategies used to historicize this tradition from feminist perspectives. Explores diverse feminist rhetorical discourses informed by race, sexual orientation, ethnicity and social class. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.

WMST/ENG 466. Studies in Women's Literature.
3 credits.
Advanced study of women's literary achievements in several cultural and historical contexts. May be focused by theme. Prerequisite: ENG 367 or ENG 368.

WMST 490. Independent Studies in Women's Studies.
3 credits.
Designed to give capable students in women's studies an opportunity to complete independent study under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Admission by recommendation of the instructor and permission of the program coordinator.

WMST 492. Internship in Women's Studies.
1-3 credits.
Provides the student with practical experience in employing and refining women's studies concepts in a public or private agency, under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Nine hours of women's studies courses, including WMST 200.

WMST 495. Special Topics in Women's Studies.
3 credits.
In-depth examination of selected topics of current importance to the field of women's studies. Offered only with approval of the program coordinator and dean of the College of Arts and Letters. May be repeated for credit when course content changes. Prerequisite: WMST 200 or consent of instructor.

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Following most course titles and credit hours is the anticipated semester offering, indicating whether a course may be scheduled in the fall, spring or summer semester. This information is provided to help students plan their course schedules. The anticipated semester offering is not the same as the schedule of classes, and the semesters listed are indicative of when the courses may be offered, not a guarantee that the course will be available every semester listed.

A G in bold and italics or an asterisk (*) preceding the course prefix and number indicates a course which potentially meets general education requirements. (If the course is part of a course sequence, the asterisk appears after the appropriate course's prefix and number.) See General Education information.

If a course has a separate laboratory period, the number of lecture hours and the number of laboratory hours per week will be shown in parentheses immediately following the course title.