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Nonprofit Studies  
Nursing
Nutrition    

 

Nonprofit Studies

Department of Social Work
NPS 300. Introduction to Nonprofits.
3 credits.
An introduction to the development of the nonprofit sector in the American context exploring history, theories, legal issues, governance and ethical considerations. Global nonprofits are also explored. Provides a foundation for subsequent work in the nonprofit studies minor. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing with a declared major.
 
NPS 320. Nonprofit Management.
3 credits.
A study of organizational and management functions in the nonprofit sector. Examination of the unique role of volunteers, boards and public relations in the nonprofit environment. Prerequisites: NPS 300 and junior status.
 
NPS 400. Internship/Practicum in Nonprofit Studies.
4 credits. (225 hours in agency), 6 credits (400 hours in agency).
Supervised internship/practicum experience in a nonprofit organization setting that allows experimental learning and practice experiences. A research or applied paper, learning journal and presentation based on the experience are required. Prerequisites: NPS 300 and discipline specific elective.
 
NPS 450. Nonprofit Studies Capstone Seminar.
3 credits.
The capstone seminar is designed to integrate and apply knowledge from the student’s major and the nonprofit studies minor. A substantial, individualized project will strengthen the student’s capabilities in research and/or applied knowledge, information access, and self-directed learning. Prerequisites: NSG 300, NSG 320, NSG 400 and discipline elective. Related elective may be taken concurrently.

 

Nursing

Department of Nursing
NSG 270. Nursing Practicum: Nursing Fundamentals.
3 credits. Offered fall, spring and summer.
This first course in the nursing curriculum focuses on the foundation of nursing practice. Through didactic learning, students are introduced to basic nursing theory and knowledge that will be applied throughout the student’s nursing education. In the laboratory, students learn the cognitive and affective processes and the psychomotor skills necessary for basic clinical practice. The clinical component of the course is a culmination of didactic and hands-on learning where students apply and practice what they have learned through the course.
 
NSG 310. Helping Persons in Pain.
2 credits. Offered spring.
This course, open to students from all majors, is an examination of pain, its impact on people, causes, treatments and the role of health professionals. Emphasis is placed on understanding how people experience pain and its effect on quality of life.
 
NSG 311. End of Life Care.
1 credit. Offered spring.
Classroom-based exploration of the care of people at the end of life from a multi-disciplinary, holistic perspective. Learning activities include guest speakers, critique of assigned readings, essay and case studies. Students from any related health care major, first year students through seniors are welcome.
 
NSG 312. Understanding Cancer.
1 credit.
This elective course, open to students from all majors, is a non-technical and practical examination for cancer and its causes, prevention, treatments and impact on people. Emphasis is placed on understanding how people experience and survive cancer. This course is tailored to include cancer-related topics that are of interest to students.
 
NSG 313. Issues and Applications of Family Caregiving.
1-2 credits. Offered fall, spring and summer.
Students from any major engage in service learning with clients and staff of Caregivers’ Community Network, a program of information, companion care and support for family caregivers. Hours are flexible and activities are tailored to student interests.
 
NSG/HTH/HHS/SOWK 314. Rural Health: An Interdisciplinary Approach.
3 credits. Offered May.
Students study, observe and participate in interdisciplinary assessment, planning and delivery of community-based primary health care in partnership with residents and agencies of a host rural county. Learning activities will emphasize rural culture, rural health care and interdisciplinary practice.
 
NSG/HHS 315. Risk Management in the Health Care System.
2 credits.
This course explores current factors having impact on the risk management of the American healthcare system. It explores the many dimensions of risk management and leadership roles, and the dissemination and utilization of risk research in hospitals.
 
NSG 330. The Professional Nurse.
2 credits.
This course provides an overview of the concepts, definitions and character of professional nursing practice within the context of ethical and legal realities of the current healthcare delivery system and of professional nursing practice. The course explores the historical development of nursing as a profession. It promotes self-analysis and socialization as a professional nurse and an understanding of the role and processes for professional nursing practice. It also begins to prepare the student in the nursing program and NCLEX testing. The beginning phases of career management are examined.
 
NSG 331. Adult Health I.
6 credits.
This course focuses on the integration of pathophysiologic and pharmacologic concepts and principles of nursing process, health promotion, risk reduction, clinical decision making and collaborative management of care for adults across the life span experiencing moderate to severe health alterations. Prerequisite: NSG 271.
 
NSG 332. Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing.
3 credits.
This course examines the pathophysiology and psychosocial manifestations and the psychopharmacological and psychiatric health nursing treatment of selected mental illness. Analysis of the role and practice of psychiatric mental health nursing both as a nursing specialty and as an integral facet of general nursing are emphasized.
 
NSG 333. Health Assessment.
3 credits.
The health assessment course is designed to develop knowledge and skills necessary to gather, organize and present relevant health data. Emphasis is placed on systematic strategies, frameworks and skills used to conduct both comprehensive and need-specific health assessments for individuals in the context of their family and community.
 
NSG 340. The Nurse Researcher.
3 credits.
This course explores the research process and utilization of research and theory in evidence-based professional practice. It also explores the dissemination and utilization of research in nursing practice. Students learn to critique the nurse and healthcare literature in order to answer a research question that would impact nursing practice.
 
NSG 341. Nursing Care of Children and Their Families.
3 credits.
This course applies the nursing process to the care of well, acutely and chronically ill, and special needs children and their families within the context of their environment. Emphasis is on anatomical, physiological and developmental differences among neonates, infants, children and adolescents that influence care. Theory, research, evidenced-based practice and critical thinking are foundations.
 
NSG 370. NSG Practicum: Gerontology.
1 credit.
Through interactions with older adults, students develop health and developmental assessment skills, and the nursing intervention skills of teaching and therapeutic communication. Emphasis is on holistic developmental assessment of individuals in a family and community context.
 
NSG 380. Advanced Skills Lab.
2 credits.
In this laboratory course, students learn additional psychomotor, cognitive and affective skills that are foundational to nursing practice. Focuses of the course include acute care skills, strategies to manage stress, alternative health techniques and therapeutic group processes.
 
NSG 381. NSG Practicum: Acute Adult Health I.
3 credits.
Students apply concepts, principles, theories and skills in the nursing care of adults experiencing moderate to severe challenges to health. In hospital settings, students are exposed to a wide variety of clinical skills gaining beginning practice in planning and facilitating nursing care for clients and their families.
 
NSG 382. NSG Practicum: Nursing Care of Children and Their Families.
2 credits.
Students apply concepts, principles, theories and skills in the nursing care of children experiencing moderate to severe challenges to health. In hospital settings, students are exposed to a wide variety of clinical skills gaining beginning practice in planning and facilitating nursing care for children and their families.
 
NSG 383. NSG Practicum: Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing.
1 credit.
This practicum exchanges the pathophysiology and psychosocial manifestations, and the psychopharmacological and psychiatric mental health nursing treatment of selected mental illnesses. Analysis of the role and practice of psychiatric mental health nursing both as a nursing specialty and as an integral facet of general nursing are emphasized.
 
NSG 430. The Nurse Leader.
2 credits.
This course covers leadership and management theory, group dynamics and the group process, organizational theory, and ‘Change Theory’ related to health systems change. This course relates professional nursing practice to patient advocacy, and care coordination, within the context of different economic reimbursement factors relative to the health care delivery system. Career management work continues in this course through a resume, portfolio and interviewing skills workshop.
 
NSG 431. Adult Health II.
6 credits.
This course is a continuation of Adult Health I and focuses on the integration of pathophysiologic and pharmacologic concepts and principles of nursing process, health promotion, risk reduction, clinical decision making and collaborative management of care for adults across the life span experiencing moderate to severe and complex health alterations.
 
NSG 432. Women’s Health.
3 credits.
This course focuses on synthesis of concepts and principles utilized in health promotion, risk reduction, clinical decision-making, and management of women’s health care. Focuses include women’s health issues, perinatal care of mothers and infants and gynecological health.
 
NSG 433. Community Health: Health Assessment of Vulnerable Populations in the Community.
2 credits.
In Part I of this course, students develop the knowledge, skills and ability to conduct and interpret systematic assessments of vulnerable aggregates in community settings. The impact of increasing societal changes and cultural diversity of vulnerability across the life span will be emphasized. Theoretical concepts of health promotion and disease prevention of vulnerable populations will be presented emphasizing Health People 2010 objectives. Part II of the course will develop the knowledge and skills necessary to gather, organize and present relevant data on target populations and entire community assessments. The influence of political, socio-economic and ecological issues on the health of populations is examined.
 
NSG 440. Transition to Practice.
3 credits.
This course explores current factors having impact on the transition to the professional practice of nursing. It examines personal and professional role importance in the process of health policy formation. Its focus on career planning and preparation for NCLEX testing and professional practice includes simulation-based learning, web-enhanced module-based case studies and NCLEX practice testing. Consideration of future directions, trends and opportunities in health care delivery and professional nursing practice are also examined.
 
NSG 461. Pathophysiology and Pharmacology.
4 credits.
This course, offered for RN-MSN program students, provides an examination of complex physiologic responses and clinical sequel in major body systems in relation to pathologic processes. Emphasis is placed upon physiologic compensation and defense responses. Pharmacologic management of pathology is investigated. Prerequisite: Admission to RN-MSN program.
 
NSG 462. Issues in Contemporary Nursing Practice.
3 credits.
This course, offered for RN-MSN program students, examines issues and trends of greatest concern to professional nursing practice today. Historical, societal, political, and economic influence and future trends will be explored. Legal and ethical dimensions of nursing will be discussed. A seminar format will be used emphasizing professional presentation of issues. Prerequisite: Admission to RN-MSN program.
 
NSG 463. Professional Role Transition.
3 credits.
This course, offered for RN-MSN program students, provides an expansion of concepts/theories from student’s initial historical review, nursing theory, leadership and management roles as well as coping strategies for role stress will be explored. Seminar format will be used. Prerequisite: Admission to RN-MSN program.
 
NSG 464. Introduction to Nursing Research.
3 credits.
This course, designed for RN-MSN students, will focus on the study of research methods that generate quantitative and qualitative data. Students will examine the research process with an emphasis on critique of research methodologies and application of research findings to nursing practice. Prerequisite: Admission to RN-MSN program.
 
NSG 465. Clinical Practicum Elective.
1-5 variable credits.
This course facilitates the RN student’s transition into a professional nursing role through a BSN/faculty mentored clinical practicum experience in a student selected clinical specialty area. The student will articulate individual objectives. An individual plan to meet the course and student’s objectives will be developed by the student and approved by the faculty. Prerequisites: Completion of NSG 321 and NSG 463.
 
NSG 466. Community Clinical Practicum.
1 credit.
This practicum, for RN-MSN students, transitions practice into the BSN role through mentored clinical experiences at selected community sites. Emphasis is on collaborative nursing care with individuals, families, and groups within the community. Experiences include concepts of health promotion and disease prevention and management of acute or chronic illness. Prerequisite: Admission to RN-MSN program.
 
NSG 467. School Nursing Practice: Addressing the Health Needs of Vulnerable Populations within the Context of Schools.
3 credits.
This course focuses on school health services for students with low-incidence disabilities. Content emphasizes the guiding principles of collaborative, comprehensive, coordinated, culturally competent, developmentally appropriate, family-centered and inclusive health and educational service provision. This is a Blackboard course that will be available for students enrolled in the SNAPP program.
 
NSG 468. Collaborative Teaming: Working Together to Improve Outcomes for Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities.
4 credits.
This course focuses on collaborative teaming as an approach to delivering inclusive services to students with low-incidence disabilities. Information on models of teamwork, group decision making, team process, leadership and effective communication will be included. Discussion will focus on the roles of various disciplines and parents and team members. This course is part of the SNAPP Scholars program. Prerequisite: NSG 467.
 
NSG 469. Caring for the Public’s Health: Community Health Nursing.
3 credits.
This course provides RN to BSN students a perspective of professional nursing at the community level of practice. Course content will provide an overview of specific issues and societal concerns that affect community health nursing practice including historical impact of public health, epidemiology, health promotion and disease prevention; vulnerable populations; communicable disease risk and prevention; and diversity of the role of the community health nurse. Prerequisite: Admission to RN-MSN program.
 
NSG 470. NSG Practicum: Community as Client.
2 credits.
This practicum provides a framework for identifying, analyzing and planning for health care needs of vulnerable populations based on the objectives of Health People 2010. The concepts of community as client and population-focused practice are presented with an emphasis on understanding the relationship between individual, family and community needs. Students will use the nursing process to perform community-focused assessment and service learning interventions while applying concepts of health promotion, disease prevention and health education to the care of vulnerable groups.
 
NSG 480. NSG Practicum: Capstone.
6 credits.
An in-depth focused practicum experience for JMU senior nursing students. The purpose of the capstone experience is to help students gain confidence in time management, critical thinking, diagnostic reasoning, documentation and psychomotor skills under the direct supervision of clinical preceptors.
 
NSG 481. NSG Practicum: Acute Adult Health II.
1 credit.
In this course, students synthesize and apply concepts, principles, theories and skills in the nursing care of adults experiencing moderate to multi-system challenges  in health. On acute and critical care nursing units, students will work in small groups to plan and facilitate care for multiple clients.
 
NSG 482. NSG Practicum: Home Health Case Management.
1 credit.
In this setting, students are provided an opportunity to learn and apply case management concepts. Students provide nursing care in the home for persons and families experiencing chronic illness. Using a case management theoretical framework, students coordinate and deliver services through visits with agency nurse case managers with direct care giving responsibilities. Issues of chronic illness, coping and extended care are explored.
 
NSG 483. NSG Practicum: Women’s Health.
1 credit.
Working in teams, students coordinate and provide nursing care for women and their families experiencing childbirth or gynecological treatment. Students observe and experience a variety of nursing roles, engage in peer performance appraisal, and promote staff and peer professional development. The application of research findings to practice is emphasized.

 

Nutrition

Department of Health Sciences
NUTR 140. Contemporary Foods (2, 2).
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Basic principles of contemporary food selection, purchasing,planning, preparation and service. Laboratory activities acquaint the student with the preparation and evaluation of quality products in the various food groups.
 
NUTR 280. Nutrition for Wellness.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Students will study the impact of nutrition on wellness by learning nutrients, their functions in the human body, food sources and appropriate intake levels. Controversies surrounding use of various nutrients for improvement of health and well-being will be discussed.
 
NUTR 295. Foundations of Nutrition Practice.
2 credits. Offered spring.
An introduction to the profession of dietetics, credentialing processes in nutrition/dietetics, careers available in the field and some basic skills needed for the profession.
 
NUTR 360. Management in Dietetics.
3 credits. Offered fall.
Application of management concepts, theories and principles to dietetics with a focus on the work environments (clinical and foodservice) in which registered dietitians must effectively practice. Prerequisites: Dietetics majors only. NUTR 280, NUTR 295 or permission of instructor.
 
NUTR 362. Food Service Systems.
3 credits. Offered spring.
An integration of menu planning, food procurement, equipment selection and layout to provide quality food service in a variety of food systems. Prerequisite: NUTR 280 or equivalent.
 
NUTR 363. Quantity Food Production (1, 6).
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The principles of quantity food production and service are studied. Prerequisites: NUTR 140, NUTR 280 and prior arrangement with the instructor.
 
NUTR 380. Global Nutrition.
3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
A study of food habits from around the world and their contributions to nutritional adequacy. Factors affecting global food consumption behaviors including sociocultural practices, religion, health beliefs, agricultural practices, economics, politics and education are explored.
 
NUTR 382. Sports Nutrition.
3 credits. Offered fall.
A study of the relationship of nutrition and athletic performance. Identification of the effects of age, sex, body build, environment and state of health on energy needs and energy sources during physical activity. Prerequisite: NUTR 280.
 
NUTR 384. Clinical Nutrition I.
3 credits. Offered spring.
This course introduces nutrition as a disease therapy and the role of the clinical dietitian as a member of the health care team. Topics covered include nutrition screening and assessment, medical records documentation, basic dietary modifications and patient/family counseling. Prerequisites: NUTR 140, NUTR 280 and NUTR 395.
 
NUTR 385. Nutrition Throughout the Life Cycle.
3 credits. Offered fall.
A study of the nutritional needs throughout the life cycle and the development of food habits. Nutrition assessment and nutrition education from prenatal health through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age are emphasized. Prerequisite: NUTR 280.
 
NUTR 386. Community Nutrition.
3 credits. Offered spring.
A study of human nutrition and health problems from a community perspective, programs and policies related to nutrition at local, state and federal levels including preventive nutrition or wellness and approaches and techniques for effective application and dissemination of nutrition knowledge in the community. Prerequisite: NUTR 280.
 
NUTR 395. Introduction to Patient Care in Dietetics.
2 credits. Offered fall.
A study of the concepts of patient care in dietetics, skills needed for medical nutrition therapy and the dietitian’s role on the health care team. Prerequisite: Must be dietetics major.
 
NUTR 446. Experimental Foods (1, 4).
3 credits. Offered fall.
An introduction to research in foods. Different techniques of food preparation are studied and evaluated for the most acceptable methods to obtain standard food products. Prerequisites: NUTR 140, organic chemistry and statistics.
 
NUTR 455/ KIN 424. Theories and Practices of Weight Management.
3 credits. Offered spring.
An examination of the physiological, psychological and environmental theories of obesity. Current trends in obesity research are emphasized. A case study and laboratories are used to provide students with practical experience in constructing a weight management program. Prerequisite: BIO 270, BIO 290, NUTR 280 or permission of the instructor.
 
NUTR 460. Computer Systems for Foods and Nutrition.
3 credits. Offered spring.
Introduction to food and nutrition computer systems. Emphasis is placed on the role of computers in nutritional assessment, food service administration, nutrition education and food technology. Prerequisites: NUTR 360, NUTR 482 and successful completion of the Tech Level I test.
 
NUTR 482. Nutrition and Metabolism (2, 2).
3 credits. Offered fall.
A study of the nutrients, their roles in intermediary metabolism, the effects of genetic errors in metabolism, nutritional deficiencies and means of assessing nutritional status. Agencies and programs concerned with nutrition and health and current trends in nutrition research are emphasized. Prerequisites: NUTR 280, physiology, biochemistry, statistics, and previous or concurrent anatomy.
 
NUTR 484. Clinical Nutrition II (2, 2).
3 credits. Offered spring.
A study of the use of diet in preventing illness and as a means of treating disease. Emphasis is given to patient education. Prerequisites: NUTR 384 and NUTR 482.
 
NUTR 490. Field Experience in Dietetics.
3 credits. Offered summer.
Students participate in field experience relating to their major area of dietetics and their career goals under the coordination of a dietetics faculty member. On-the-job supervision will be provided by the participating hospital dietitians. Prerequisites: NUTR 384, NUTR 395. Application for enrollment must be completed through the course instructor in the fall semester prior to the summer in which it will be taken. Cumulative GPA of 2.0 required.
 
NUTR 495. Senior Seminar in Dietetics.
2 credits. Offered fall.
Students will be introduced to research in dietetics and conduct a senior research project. The Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice of the American Dietetic Association will be investigated, and students will prepare for their postgraduate dietetic internship.
 
NUTR 496. Special Studies in Nutrition/Dietetics.
1-3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course is designed to give the student in dietetics an opportunity to complete independent study, professional conference participation and/or research under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of the coordinator of the dietetics program.
 
NUTR 499. Honors.
6 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Year course.


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Following most course titles and credit hours is the anticipated semester offering, indicating whether a course may be scheduled in the fall, spring or summer semester. This information is provided to help students plan their course schedules. The anticipated semester offering is not the same as the schedule of classes, and the semesters listed are indicative of when the courses may be offered, not a guarantee that the course will be available every semester listed.