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Justice Studies

Mission Statement

Admission to the Major

Goals

Tracks

Career Opportunities

Typical Program for Majors

Degree and Major Requirements

Minor in Criminal Justice


Dr. Glen Hastedt, Director

Phone: (540) 568-7124

E-mail: hastedgp@jmu.edu

Mission

The Department of Justice Studies is committed to offering an interdisciplinary, intellectually challenging and vocationally relevant course of study for persons interested in academic or applied careers in justice studies at the community, national or global level.


Goals

To carry out this mission, the Department of Justice Studies seeks to:

  • Help students develop a comprehensive understanding of justice studies
  • Examine and explain justice and injustice and their impact on individuals, communities, intuitions and/or nations
  • Understand human behavior and interactive systems with a focus on negotiation and conflict resolution in justice contexts.
  • Sharpen students’ ability to think and reason critically, to practice sound methodological skills and to communicate effectively.
  • Prepare students to utilize and produce scholarship in the field of Justice Studies.

Career Opportunities

  • Law enforcement
  • Corrections
  • Law
  • Peace Corps
  • Nonprofit groups (national and international)
  • Human Services
  • Domestic and International Security
  • Intelligence Analysis
  • Diplomatic Corps
  • Research and Graduate Study

The Justice Studies major includes opportunities for field work and career-related internships as part of the curriculum.


Major Requirements  

Students in the Justice Studies major can earn a B.S. or B.A. degree, as follows:

Bachelor of Arts

Credit Hours

General Education

41

Philosophy course
(Except GPHIL 120A)

3

Foreign Language courses
(intermediate level required)

1-14

Major requirements

38-44

Electives

18-38


 

120

Bachelor of Science

Credit Hours

General Education courses

41

Quantitative requirement
(In addition to General Education courses)

3

Scientific Literacy requirement
(In addition to General Education courses)

3-4

Major requirements

38-44

Electives

28-35


 

120


Admission to the Major

Students are admitted to the major by application only. Students interested in declaring a major in Justice Studies must declare Pre-Justice prior to being eligible to enroll in the gateway course, JUST 200. Introduction to Justice Studies. Any student may declare Pre-Justice. Declaring Pre-Justice does not guarantee that the student will be accepted into Justice Studies. Pre-Justice students may take JUST 200, but are restructured from other Justice courses until accepted into the major. During the semester in which students are enrolled in JUST 200, they may apply for admission to the major. The successful applicant will have achieved sophomore standing, a 2.5 GPA overall, and completed JUST 200 with a “C” or better. Students should consult the department head of Justice Studies for deadlines and a checklist of required application materials. Students will be admitted as space is available.

Justice Studies Major requirements

Core Courses

Credit Hours

JUST 100. Proseminar

1

JUST 200. Introduction to Justice Studies

3

JUST 201. Justice Research Methods

3

SCOM 220. Introduction to Interpersonal Communication

3

JUST 300. Perspectives on Comparative Justice Systems

3

JUST 400. Senior Seminars in Justice Studies

3


 

17


Tracks

Students select one track.

Track A. Crime and Criminology.

For persons interested in careers in law enforcement, courts and corrections. This track focuses on the nature, causes and solutions for the crime problem in the USA. All students in Track A must take PUAD/JUST 215. Introduction to Criminal Justice or SOCI/JUST 325. Criminology. Whichever courses is not selected for the Track requirement can be selected as an elective in Track A.
Students select six additional courses. Total course work must represent at least three different disciplines. No more than two 200-level courses may be selected in completing the track requirement. Select from the following:

JUST 301. Special Topics in Justice Studies
JUST/SOCI 326. Victimology
JUST 401. Internship in Justice Studies
JUST 402. Advanced Research in Justice Studies
PHIL 270. Introduction to Ethics
PHIL 325. Crime, Punishment and Justice
PHIL 367. Topics in Philosophy of Law
PHIL 335. The Individual, the State and Justice
POSC 326. Civil Rights
POSC 435. Seminar in International Terrorism
PSYC 250. Introduction to Abnormal Psychology
(for non-psychology majors. Psychology majors take PSYC 335.)
OR
PSYC/JUST 255. Abnormal Psychology for Law Enforcement
(for non-psychology majors. Psychology majors take PSCY 335.)
PSYC 312. Forensic Psychology
PSYC/JUST 314. Police Psychology
PUAD/JUST 215. Introduction to Criminal Justice
PUAD 327. Criminal Law
PUAD 328. Criminal Procedure
PUAD 329. Criminal Investigation and Evidence
PUAD 410. Administration of Criminal Justice
SCOM 231. Introduction to Alternative Dispute Resolution
SCOM 248. Intercultural Communication
SCOM 331. Communication and Conflict
SCOM 342. Argument and Advocacy
SCOM 431. Legal Communication
SOCI 214. Social Deviance
SOCI/JUST 325. Criminology
SOCI/SOWK 330. Corrections
SOCI 369. Law and Society

Track B. Policy and Justice in Global Context

For persons interested in careers in public policy, law, and international organizations. This track focuses on issues of justice in global context-international crime and law, human rights, and international /intercultural conflict. All students in Track B must take POSC 230. International Relations. Students select six additional courses. Total coursework must represent at least three different disciplines. No more than two 200-level courses may be selected in completing the track requirement.
Select from the following:

ANTH 265. People and Cultures of Latin America/Caribbean
ANTH 280. People and Cultures of Sub-Saharan Africa
ANTH 340. Race, Nation and Culture
ANTH 364. US/Latin American Borders
ANTH 380. Chinese Society and Culture
GHUM 251. Human Rights
GSOCI 210. Social Issues in Global Context
HIST. Any 300-level history course that is centered
on a world region (other than North America) and that
includes coverage of the 20th century. JUST 301. Special Topics in Justice Studies
JUST 401. Internship in Justice Studies
JUST 402. Advanced Research in Justice Studies
PHIL 270. Introduction to Ethics
PHIL 325. Crime, Punishment and Justice
PHIL 335. The Individual, the State and Justice
PHIL 367. Topics in Philosophy of Law
PHIL 445. Advanced Political Philosophy
POSC/JUST 392. Peace Studies
POSC 395. International Law
POSC 396. International Organizations
POSC 435. Seminar in International Terrorism
POSC: Any 300-level Political Science course that is regionally focused.
PUAD 323. Comparative Criminal Justice
REL 270. Religious Ethics
REL 450. Religion and Society (topics as relevant): Reconciliation
SCOM 248. Intercultural Communication
SCOM 331. Communication and Conflict
OR
SOWK 487. Topics: Conflict and Mediation
SCOM 342. Argument and Advocacy
SCOM 352. Communication and Social Movements
SCOM 353. Political Communication
SOCI./ANTH/SOWK 348. Third World Societies: An Introduction
SOCI 360. Modern Social Movements
SOCI 369. Law and Society

Track C. Community, Youth and Family

For persons interested in careers in juvenile probation, human services, not for profit charitable and related "helping" careers devoted to eliminating the causes and consequences of crime. This track focuses on the nature and needs of victims of crimes and injustice, on the ways in which communities are affected by illegal and unjust behaviors and on ways in which victims (and some classes of offenders, especially children) can be helped.

Students in Track C must take SOCI 265. Sociology of Community
OR
SOCI 276. Sociology of Family (or FAM 133. Contemporary Family)
OR
JUST/PSYC 316. Developmental Psychology and Crime

Students select six additional courses. Total coursework must represent at least three different disciplines. No more than two 200-level courses may be selected in completing the track requirement.
Select from the following:

FAM 133. The Contemporary Family
OR
SOCI 276. Sociology of the Family
FAM 330. Family Relations
HIST 466. The Family
JUST 301. Special Topics in Justice Studies
JUST/PSYC 316. Developmental Psychology and Crime
JUST/SOCI 326. Victimology
JUST 401. Internship in Justice Studies
JUST 402. Advanced Research in Justice Studies
PHIL 270. Introduction to Ethics
PHIL 335. The Individual, the State and Justice
PSYC 250. Introduction to Abnormal Psychology
(for non-psychology majors. Psychology majors take PSYC 335.)
OR
PSYC 255. Abnormal Psychology for Law Enforcement
(for non-psychology majors.) Psychology majors take PSYC 335.)
SCOM 231. Introduction to Alternative Dispute Resolution
SCOM 248. Intercultural Communication
SCOM 331. Communication and Conflict
OR
SOWK 487. Topics: Conflict and Mediation
SCOM 352. Communication and Social Movements
SCOM 342. Argument and Advocacy
SCOM 431. Legal Communication
SOCI 214. Social Deviance
SOCI 265. Sociology of Community
SOCI 276. Sociology of Family
OR
FAM 133. Contemporary Family
SOCI 327. Juvenile Delinquency
SOCI/SOWK 330. Corrections
SOCI 360. Modern Social Movements
SOWK 338. Issues and Policies in Family Services
SOWK 340. Violence in the Family
SOWK 342. Child Welfare
SOWK 387. Working with Teens
SOWK 487. Topics: Conflict and Mediation
OR
SCOM 331. Communication and Conflict


Typical Program for Majors

First Year

Credit Hours

JUST 200. Intro to Justice

3

MATH 220. (prerequisite for JS 201)
(can be counted for General Education, Cluster 3)

3


 

6

 

 

Second Year

Credit Hours

JUST 100. Pro Seminar

1

JUST 201. Research Methods

4

Communication course

3

Track requirement

3

GPSYC 101. (prerequisite for PSYC electives)
(can be counted for General Education, Cluster 5)

3


 

14

 

 

Third Year

Credit Hours

JUST 300. Perspectives on Comparative Justice

3

Track Elective 1

3

Track Elective 2

3

Track Elective 3

3


 

12

 

 

Fourth Year

Credit Hours

JUST 400. Senior Seminar in Justice Studies

3

Track Elective 1

3

Track Elective 2

3

Track Elective 3

3


 

12


Minor in Criminal Justice

The interdisciplinary minor in Criminal Justice is designed for students who are preparing for careers in law enforcement, corrections, judicial administration, or other areas related to study or management of crime, either directly upon graduation or after further graduate study. No more than three courses can be double counted for Justice Studies majors who wish to minor in Criminal Justice. The requirement for a minor in Criminal Justice is 21 hours including:

Minor Requirements

Credit Hours

PUAD 215. Introduction to Criminal Justice

3

SOCI 325. Criminology

3

PSYC 250. Introduction to Abnormal Psychology (non-psychology majors only. Psychology majors must take PSYC 335.)

3

Electives
Choose four courses from the following (no more than two classes may be in any single discipline):
PHIL 325. Crime, Punishment and Justice
POSC 326. Civil Rights
PSYC 312. Forensic Psychology
PUAD 323. Comparative Criminal Justice
PUAD 327. Criminal Law
PUAD 328. Criminal Procedure
PUAD 329. Criminal Investigation and Evidence
PUAD 410. Administration in Criminal Justice
SCOM 231. Introduction to Alternative Disputer Resolution
SCOM 331. Communication and Conflict
OR
SOWK 487. Topics: Conflict and Mediation
SOCI 214. Social Deviance
SOCI 327. Juvenile Delinquency
SOCI/SOWK 330. Corrections
PUAD 495. or POSC 495/497 or SOCI 485 or PSYC 495. Internship 1
SOCI 490. or PSYC 402. Readings and Research 2

12


 

21

1 Internships must be in a criminal justice related field in order to receive credit for the Criminal Justice minor. Credit for only one internship will be given towards the minor.
2 Readings and Research courses must be specifically related to the field of criminal justice. Students may register for only one Readings/Research class for credit towards the minor.

For further information and advice regarding the Criminal Justice minor, students should contact the Criminal Justice Program director, Dr. Peggy Plass.

 

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