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Institute For Innovation In Health And Human Services

Dr. Vida Huber, Director

Web site: http://www.iihhs.jmu.edu/


Mission

It is the mission of the Institute to:

  • Foster a culture that values cross-disciplinary interaction, communication, and collaboration to enrich teaching, learning, research, and service delivery in the area of health and human services;
  • Build university-community partnerships that are responsive to the communities we represent; and
  • Enhance initiatives and educational relevance through student service learning.

Goals

The Institute will:

  • Foster cross-disciplinary collaboration and innovation in educational, research, and service initiatives in health and human services;
  • Create mechanisms and incentives to encourage cross-disciplinary and cross-university HHS initiatives that develop and implement: courses and educational programs, research, collaborative practice, and service delivery models that incorporated student service learning.
  • Promote and coordinate cross-disciplinary faculty and student participation in initiatives.
  • Develop initiatives that are responsive to cultural and societal needs and trends.
  • Promote partnerships with agencies, organizations, and professionals within the communities served.
  • Secure the resources needed to fulfill the mission of the Institute.

The following centers, programs and activities are related to the mission of the Institute for Innovation in Health and Human Services.

Acting Out: Teen Theater Programs

Ann Myers, Coordinator

Acting Out uses theater to educate and empower bthrough two programs. Teen Theater works with students age 12-18 to produce an original script each semester while the OutREACH Program focuses on character building in regional middle and high schools and after school programs in the community.

Adult Health and Development Program (ADHP)

Ann Myers, Coordinator

The Adult Health and Development Program (ADHP) is an intergenerational program designed to promote health in older adults (those 55+). College students work one-on-one with older adults from the local community. An individualized program is designed to meet each program participant's unique needs. The outcome of the program is the development of a sense of positive health and well being in the older adult while promoting a sense of community on a broader scale.

Alpha Epsilon Delta (AED)

Deborah Ford, Program Coordinator

Alpha Epsilon Delta, the largest honor society exclusively serving pre-professional health students has its national headquarters at JMU. It has 186 chapters and a membership of more than 145,000. The Scalpel, the AED journal, is published twice a year. AED is a member society of the Association of College Honor Societies.

Alzheimer's Association

Mary Moomaw, Regional Director

The Central and Western Virginia Chapter of the Alzheimer's Association is a non-profit community-based organization. The chapter supports people affected by Alzheimer's disease and related diseases in our community, as well as their families, friends and caregivers. This assistance comes in the form of a toll-free HelpLine, support groups and care consultation in each region, lending libraries, Safe Return and Respite Care scholarships, as well as many other programs and services.

Attention and Learning Disabilities Center (ALDC)

Dr. Steve Evans, Director

The Alvin V. Baird Attention and Learning Disabilities Center (ALDC) is a center dedicated to service, training, and research focused on individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders (ADHD) and learning disabilities. There are many services provided including the Challenging Horizons Program, Learning Leaders, and Center for Learning Strategies. The Challenging Horizons Program is a school based treatment program for middle school youth with ADHD and is a treatment outcome research project. Learning Leaders is a mentoring and remedial education program for children with ADHD and learning disabilities. The Center for Learning Strategies provides evaluation and consultation services for young adults enrolled in a college or university.

Bio and Health Informatics Center

Dr. Jeff Kushner, Director

The Center is designed to provide an infrastructure for promoting, coordinating and facilitating learning opportunities, initiatives and projects in the area of Bio and Health Informatics.

Blue Ridge Area Health Education Center (AHEC) At James Madison University

Christopher Nye, Executive Director

The Blue Ridge Area Health Education Center (AHEC) at JMU strives to improve the health of communities through education, collaboration, and cooperation. It focuses on the health care needs of "vulnerable" populations. The AHEC fosters partnerships that utilize academic and community resources and directs these resources to health and human service gaps that exist within communities. The AHEC program has been a traditional link between academic health and human service professions programs and communities where the community benefits from student, faculty, and other academic resources to the benefit of the community.

Caregivers Community Network

Shannon Bridgman, Coordinator

CCN provides services, companionship, and support for those who care for frail older family members. CCN also provides services for those with memory loss or Alzheimer's disease. CCN can help to give caregivers a break and provide valuable time to care for themselves, as well as their loved ones.

Community Health Interpreter Service

Beth Rogers, Coordinator

For hundreds of Shenandoah Valley residents, linguistic and cultural barriers seriously compromise the quality of health care that they receive. To address this challenge, the Blue Ridge AHEC at JMU provides training to bilingual persons who then interpret for limited English proficient persons during health and medical care encounters. The program schedules interpreters upon request from area health care providers.

Counseling and Psychological Services Center

Dr. Tim Schulte, Director

Counseling and Psychological Services offers friendly, affordable care to persons of all ages. Graduate students in JMU's Department of Psychology work professional Care Team, to provide quality counseling services for you and your family.

Generations Together at JMU

Ann Myers, Coordinator

Generations Together is an intergenerational program combining the interests and activities of children, college students, and older adults. College students and adults will be paired together to be co-mentors to a grade-school aged child while participating in group games and other fun activities. Each week the students, adults and children will participate in planned activities that will allow each individual to benefit from an intergenerational experience.

Healthy Families Page County

Emily Akerson, Director

Healthy Families Page County is a new program that provides home-visiting for low-income, first-time parents. A family support worker provides education, mentoring support, and referrals to appropriate community resources.

Lifelong Learning Institute (LLI)

Nancy Grembi, Director

The Lifelong Learning Institute (LLI), a partnership between JMU and adults over the age of 50 from the region, offers participants college level courses on a non-credit basis. Undergraduate students can assist in the classroom by enrolling in a one-credit workshop course.

Office on Children and Youth (OCY)

Jane Hubbell, Director

The Office on Children and Youth, a partnership program, provides information and referral services to children and youth with the goal of promoting positive development. OCY is a central contact point for services in the Shenandoah Valley to support, coordinate, and examine the needs of our children and youth. OCY administers the Youth Data Survey bi-annually in the Harrisonburg City and Rockingham County Schools. Current grant funded outreach programs within OCY are: Teen Pregnancy Prevention, Tobacco Free Youth, and The Reading Road Show.

Office of Substance Abuse Research

Jeanne M. Martino-McAllister, Director

The Office of Substance Abuse Research (OSAR), located within the Department of Health Sciences, is designed to serve students, faculty, the community and the Commonwealth of Virginia in addressing alcohol and other drug usage prevention. OSAR has a long history of supporting substance abuse prevention through an undergraduate curriculum for minors, survey research, evaluation, data collection, capacity-building, curriculum development, science-based programs and practices technical assistance and workforce development. Services are provided on a contractual basis to off-campus constituents.

Promotoras de Salud (Lay Health Promotor)

Beth Rogers, Coordinator

Through a forty-hour curriculum in basic health promotion and disease prevention, Hispanic women are empowered to take greater control of their health and assist members of their community by providing health information and directing them to appropriate community resources.

Shenandoah Valley Child Development Clinic (CDC)

Penny Critzer and Liz Dahmus, Co-directors

The CDC provides individualized, interdisciplinary, evaluations that may include medical, social work, nursing, educational, psychological, speech/language and audiology components depending upon the specialized needs of the child/adolescent. Children/adolescents evaluated may have developmental, educational, emotional or behavioral concerns. By partnering with families and community service providers care coordination services are provided to assist children/adolescents and families in accessing medical, educational, social and mental health services. Services are provided on a sliding fee scale and Medicaid/FAMIS are accepted. The CDC serves as a resource to the community by providing consultation, training and advocacy for children, adolescents, families and service providers. Training opportunities are available in the CDC for students from a variety of disciplines.

Shenandoah Valley Migrant Education Program (MEP)

Jane Hubbell, Coordinator

The Migrant Education Program provides free, supplemental education services to children and youth aged 3-21 of migrant and highly mobile agricultural workers. Services include tutoring/mentoring, school readiness initiatives, dropout prevention activities, educational interpretations (Spanish/English) and facilitation of families stabilization in the community. The SVMEP serves as a point of contact for the Hispanic Services Council, a networking organization of agencies interested in the Latino population.

Speech-Language-Hearing Applied Laboratory

Sara Elizabeth Runyan, Director

The JMU Speech-Language-Hearing Applied Laboratory, formerly referred to as the JMU Speech and Hearing Center, provides communication evaluation and treatment services to individuals with known or suspected speech and/or hearing impairments. For over 25 years this center has provided assistance to residents of the Shenandoah Valley, including clients ranging in age from infants to senior citizens. Hearing testing and aid advising is available for those with concerns over hearing. Evaluation and treatment of communication impairments, including speech, sound disorders, language impairments, voice disorders, and stuttering problems are additional services offered in the applied laboratory. Graduate students supervised by faculty who are licensed audiologists or speech-language pathologists serve as clinicians in this lab.

The Health Place

Emily Akerson, Director

The Health Place (THP), an initiative of the Institute for Innovation in Health and Human Services serves as a resource that promotes the provision of interdisciplinary health and human services that are affordable, accessible, responsive to, and advance the physical, mental and developmental health of Page County residents. Programs and services provided through or supported by THP are characterized by their responsiveness to community- identified needs, quality, dignity and respect accorded each individual.

Valley Health Exchange Network

The Valley Health Exchange Network (VHEN) is a federally funded initiative that assists health and human service providers in the Shenandoah Valley respond more effectively to the health care needs of the growing limited English proficient population. VHEN provides linguistic, cultural diversity, and health promotion - disease prevention resources within the region's health and human service delivery system and within LEP communities.

Virginia Center for Health Outreach

Chris Nye, Executive Director

The Virginia Center for Health Outreach (VCHO) is developing an infrastructure to strengthen the practice, policy, and research of the Community Health Worker (CHW) field in Virginia. CHWs are trained laypersons that serve as health resource persons in the communities where they live and work. The Center works to acknowledge and help CHWs capitalize upon the key roles they play in improving public health through the provision of preventive services and facilitating access to primary care.

Training /Technical Assistance Centers (T/TAC)

The mission of Virginia's Training/Technical Assistance Centers (T/TAC) is to improve educational opportunities and contribute to the success of children and youth with disabilities (birth - 22 years). The centers provide quality training and technical assistance in response to local, regional, and state needs. T/TAC services increase the capacity of schools, school personnel, service providers, and families to meet the needs of children and youth. The Region 5 T/TAC serves as the fiscal agent for the Northwestern T/TAC Consortium which includes the Region 4 T/TAC located at George Mason University.

Workforce Improvement Network

The Workforce Improvement Network is funded by the Office of Adult Education of the Virginia Department of Education and is a partnership between James Madison University and the Virginia Literacy Foundation. The mission of the WIN is to encourage and support the development and expansion of customized foundational basic skill instruction for Virginia's workforce.


Prehealth Programs Advising and Evaluation Service

The Institute for Innovation in Health and Human Services offers an advising and evaluation service for students interested in pre-health professional preparation. These prehealth “programs” are not majors or minors but declared interest areas. Schools of professional health are most concerned with the overall scope and quality of a student’s undergraduate performance and it is important that students select a major based on their interests and aptitudes.
Preparation plans for selected prehealth professional areas have been identified. The programs of study outlined below are recommendations and guidelines only and do not assure meeting all requirements for a given program. Graduate professional programs have unique requirements and students must check with individual schools for more definitive statements regarding admission policies and requirements. The coordinators listed are available to assist students in making career decisions. Additional information about each of the pre-professional health preparation areas is available on the Web at www.iihhs.jum.edu.


Pre-dentistry

Dr. Steve Stewart, Coordinator

 

Credit Hours

BIO 114. Organisms

4

BIO 214. Cell and Molecular Biology

4

BIO 370. Animal Physiology

4

CHEM 131-132. General Chemistry

8

(including laboratory 131L-132L)

 

CHEM 341-342. Organic Chemistry

8

(including laboratory 346L)

 

PHYS 140-150. General Physics

8

(including laboratory 140L – 150L)

 

Students are encouraged to take BIO 224 (Genetics and Development)

 

Pre-medicine

Dr. Sharon Babcock, Coordinator

 

Credit Hours

BIO 114. Organisms

4

BIO 214. Cell and Molecular Biology

4

CHEM 131-132. General Chemistry

8

(including laboratory 131L-132L)

 

CHEM 341-342. Organic Chemistry

8

(including laboratory 346L)

 

PHYS 140-150. General Physics

8

(including laboratory 140L – 150L)

 

English

6

Mathematics (calculus and statistics)

6

Students are encouraged to take additional coursework in genetics (BIO 224 or BIO 230), physiology (BIO 370), and/or biochemistry (CHEM 361)

 

Pre-occupational therapy**

Dr. Jeffrey Loveland, Coordinator

 

Credit Hours

BIO 270. Human Physiology

4

BIO 290. Human Anatomy

4

CHEM 120+L. Concepts in Chemistry and lab

4

MATH 220. Elementary Statistics

3

GPSYC 160. Developmental Psychology

3

PSYC 250. Abnormal Psychology

3

GSOC 210. Social Issues or

3

GSOC 240 Individuals in Society

 

Pre-optometry

Dr. Jeffrey Andre, Coordinator

 

Credit Hours

BIO 114. Organisms

4

BIO 214. Cell and Molecular Biology

4

BIO 370. Animal Physiology

4

CHEM 131-132. General Chemistry

8

(including laboratory 131L-132L)

 

CHEM 341-342. Organic Chemistry

8

(including laboratory 346L)

 

PHYS 140-150. General Physics

8

(including laboratory 140L-150L)

 

Mathematics (statistics and calculus recommended)

9-11

Note: Students should also check the specific admissions requirements of individual optometry schools for additional recommended courses.

 

Pre-pharmacy

Dr. Donna Amenta, Coordinator

 

Credit Hours

BIO 114. Organisms

4

BIO 214. Cell and Molecular Biology

4

CHEM 131-132. General Chemistry

8

(including laboratory 131L-132L)

 

CHEM 341-342. Organic Chemistry

8

(including laboratory 346L)

 

GWRIT 103. Critical Reading and Writing

3

PHYS 140-150. General Physics (including laboratory 140L-150L)

8

GCOM 121 or GCOM 122 Public Speaking

3

Choose one:

6

MATH 155 - MATH 205 Functions and Probability and
Introductory Calculus
MATH 205-206. Introductory Calculus

 

Electives 1

18

1 Requirements depend on program.

Pre-physical Therapy

Mr. Jeff Konin, Coordinator

 

Credit Hours

BIO 270. Human Physiology

4

BIO 290. Human Anatomy

4

CHEM 131-132. General Chemistry
(including laboratory 131L-132L)

8

PHYS 140-150. General Physics
(including laboratory 146L)

8

MATH 220. Elementary Statistics

3

MATH 205. Introductory Calculus I

3

English (literature, composition, or scientific writing)

6

GPSYC 101. General Psychology

3

GPSYC 160. Developmental Psychology

3

PSYC 250. Abnormal Psychology

3

GSOCI 210. Social Issues in a Global Context

3

HTH 390. Introduction to PT

1

NOTE: Physical therapy schools often have varying prerequisite requirements for admission. Classes listed here meet Pre-PT requirements at JMU, but may differentiate slightly from what some PT schools require.

Pre-physician assistant**

Dr. James Hammond, Coordinator

 

Credit Hours

BIO 270. Human Physiology

4

BIO 290. Human Anatomy

4

Choose one:

 

CHEM 120+L. Concepts in Chemistry and lab (4)
CHEM 131/132 + Labs. General Chemistry (8)

 

CHEM 221+L. Concepts of Organic Chemistry

4

MATH 220. Statistics

3

HTH 300. Medical Terminology

3

Pre-veterinary

Dr. Thomas Hancock, Coordinator

 

Credit Hours

CHEM 131/132 + Labs. General Chemistry

8

CHEM 341/342/346. Organic Chemistry

8

CHEM 361. Biochemistry

3

PHYS 140/150 + Labs. General Physics

8

MATH 220. Elementary Statistics

3

MATH 231/232. Calculus with Applications

8

BIO 114. Organisms

4

BIO 214. Cell and Molecular Biology

4

BIO 224. Genetics and Development

4

BIO 370. Animal Physiology

4

BIO 380. General Microbiology

4

** These pre-professional programs do not insure that all prerequisite requirements for all professional programs, including JMU programs, are being met. Please consult with each program of interest to establish a full listing of all prerequisites for that program.

 

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