General Business

German

General Education

Gerontology

Geographic Science

Graphic Design

Geology

Greek


General Business

College of Business

GBUS 160. Business Decision Making in Modern Society

3 credits

This course introduces the concepts of basic technology literacy, information retrieval via electronic and hard copy; along with critical thinking skills. Basic business principles will be introduced to reinforce these concepts and their relationships. The course provides opportunity for applying the skills of oral and written communication to a variety of learning activities. Corequisite: Open to students who have not completed COB 300.


General Education

The Human Community

GAMST 200. Introduction to American Studies

3 credits

This interdisciplinary course examines representations of America and American identity in philosophy, literature and the arts. We investigate conflicts in values and beliefs as shaped by class, gender, race, landscape, and “progress.” Students will articulate an informed understanding of their own position in the development of America’s national and international identity.

GANTH 195. Cultural Anthropology

3 credits

An introduction to the nature of culture and its relationship to language, economics, politics, kinship and other institutions in diverse cultures. The course also provides an overview of the theories, methods and ethical responsibilities involved in the study of cultural systems and ethnographic writing.

GART 200. Art in General Culture

3 credits

An exploratory course which aims to develop a non- technical, general, cultural understanding of the space arts, such as architecture, painting, sculpture and industrial design. Emphasis is on the contemporary.

GARTH 205. Survey of World Art I: Prehistoric to Renaissance

3 credits

An introduction to the art and architecture of the world from cave painting through European Pre-Renaissance art. Includes ancient through medieval art in Europe and the Near East as well as Asian and African arts.

GARTH 206. Survey of World Art II: Renaissance to Modern

3 credits

An introduction to the art and architecture of the world from the Renaissance through Modern ages. Includes European Renaissance, Baroque, Enlightenment, 19th and 20th centuries as well as Asian and African arts.

GBUS 160. Business Decision Making in a Modern Society

3 credits

This course introduces the concepts of basic technology literacy, information retrieval via electronic and hard copy; along with critical thinking skills. Basic business principles will be introduced to reinforce these concepts and their relationships. The course provides opportunity for applying the skills of oral and written communication to a variety of learning activities. Corequisite: Open to students who have not completed COB 300.

GCOM 121. Fundamental Human Communication: Presentations

3 credits

Study of human communication as a process. Overview of the principles and practices of interpersonal, small group and public communication. Emphasis on examining the role of self-concept, perception, culture, verbal and nonverbal dimensions in the communication process, using power and managing conflict, applying critical listening, practicing audience analysis within informative speech making. Public speaking required.

GCOM 122. Fundamental Human Communication: Individual Presentations

3 credits

Study of human communication as a process. Overview of the principles and practices of communication in a public environment. Emphasis on examining the role of self-concept, perception, culture, verbal and nonverbal dimensions in the communication process, using power and managing conflict, applying critical listening, practicing audience analysis, and constructing informative and persuasive speeches. Public speaking required.

GCOM 123. Fundamental Human Communication: Group Presentations

3 credits

Study of human communication as a process. Overview of the principles and practices of communication in small group and public communication contexts. Emphasis on examining the role of self-concept, perception, culture, verbal and nonverbal dimensions in the communication process, using power and managing conflict, applying critical and interpersonal listening, understanding group dynamics and problem solving, practicing audience analysis, and constructing informative and persuasive group presentations Public speaking required.

GECON 200. Introduction to Macroeconomics

3 credits

Behavior of economic systems at the national and international levels. Topics include the methodology of economics as a social science, supply and demand, definition and measurement of important macroeconomic variables and theoretical models of growth, inflation, interest rates, unemployment, business cycles, stabilization policy, exchange rates and the balance of payments.

GEIC 101. Wellness Dimension: Individual Perspectives

3 credits

The study of individuals developing and functioning in the human community. Emphasis placed on genetics, social influences and interaction, health and wellness-related behaviors, and personal choices. Suggestions are given as to how these factors contribute to human development and influence dimensions of personal health and wellness throughout lifelong process.

GEIC 102. The Sociocultural Dimensions: Community Perspective

3 credits

The study of principles and practices of participation in communities. Emphasis placed on how leadership affects communication, conflict, diversity, community change, and social responsibility. Primary focus on interpreting behavior, identifying and evaluating one’s actions, understanding ethical and non-ethical practices, and identifying sociocultural and psychological variables within the social context. Prerequisite: GEIC 101 (or permission of the instructor).

GENG 235. Survey of English Literature: From Beowulf to the 18th Century

3 credits

A general survey presented chronologically.

GENG 236. Survey of English Literature: 18th Century to Modern

3 credits

A general survey presented chronologically.

GENG 239. Studies in World Literature

3 credits

Introduction to masterpieces of world literature with emphasis on non-Western literature. (May be focused regionally or topically.)

GENG 247. Survey of American Literature: From the Beginning to the Civil War

3 credits

A general survey presented chronologically.

GENG 248. Survey of American Literature: From the Civil War to the Modern Period

3 credits

A general survey presented chronologically.

GENG 260. Survey of African-American Literature

3 credits

Survey of literature by African-American authors from the 18th century to the present.

GGEOG 200. Geography: The Global Dimension

3 credits

This course promotes global understanding through the study of humans, their institutions and processes and the resulting interactions between humans and the environment. The course will include the study of western and non-western peoples and their social, cultural, political and economic relationships.

GHIST 101. Global Culture to 1650

3 credits

A survey of important historical developments from prehistoric times to the mid-17th century. Emphasis is given to the rise and decline of great global civilizations and to their lasting contributions to humanity.

GHIST 102. Global Culture Since 1650

3 credits

A survey of important historical developments from the mid-17th century to the present. Emphasis is given to the growth of nationalism, the development of colonialism and to global events, problems and conflicts of the present century.

GHIST 150. Critical Issues in Recent Global History

3 credits

This course examines issues in recent history as a means to introduce, develop and enhance critical thinking skills and to supplement writing, oral communication, library and computing skills objectives for General Education Cluster One. A seminar format allows for careful examination of issues in both oral and written formats. The course emphasizes the development and articulation of well reasoned arguments in organized and grammatically acceptable prose.

GHIST 225. U.S. History

4 credits

A survey of U.S. history from the colonial period to the present, emphasizing the development of American civic life, the involvement of the U.S. in world affairs and the cultural richness of the American people. This course stresses the analysis and interpretation of primary sources.

GHTH 100. Personal Wellness

3 credits

Emphasizes lifestyle behaviors contributing to health promotion and disease prevention. General areas affecting health status are identified and suggestions made as to how health-related behaviors, self-care and individual decisions contribute to wellness and influence dimensions of health. A one-hour weekly individual physical wellness lab is included.

GHUM 102. God, Meaning and Morality

3 credits

A study of the ways in which various communities perceive and understand the basis of knowledge, reality, meaning and purpose, ethics and aesthetics. Students will explore religious and nonreligious approaches to these issues.

GHUM 200. Great Works

3 credits

An intensive examination of great literary works that focus on key issues of knowledge and reality, meaning and purpose, ethics and aesthetics. Discussion, analysis and intensive writing are required. Texts will vary by section and instructor.

GHUM 250. Foundations of Western Culture

3 credits

This course is a study of the roots of our western tradition in Greek, Roman, Medieval or Renaissance culture. Students examine the interrelationships among history and literary works; the fine arts; philosophical and religious thought and intellectual contexts. Content will vary depending on section and instructor.

GHUM 251. Modern Perspectives

3 credits

An interdisciplinary study within the modern period of arts and humanities. Students will examine the interrelationships among history and the arts, philosophy, religion and the intellectual ideas of the time. Topics will vary by section.

GHUM 252. Cross-Cultural Perspectives

3 credits

This course is a cross-disciplinary study of a non-western culture. Students examine the ways people have responded to the human condition from different historical, religious and philosophical positions, and with their own artistic, musical and theatrical expressions. Sections, which vary by instructor, include East-Asian Experiences and West-African Humanities.

GISAT 112. Environmental Issues in Science and Technology (2, 2)

3 credits

This course integrates the study of biology, chemistry and statistics within the context of environmental issues that include ozone depletion, acid rain, global warming, waste management and biodiversity. Corequisite: GISAT 141 or permission of instructor.

GISAT 113. Issues in Science and Technology: Living Systems (2, 2)

3 credits

This course introduces current topics in the life science technologies through lecture and laboratory exercises. Topics include advances in genetic engineering, the hierarchy of life and the rise of infectious diseases. Prerequisite: GISAT 112.

GISAT 141. Analytical Methods I (3, 2)

4 credits

This course introduces the student to science and the scientific method; introductory statistics and graphical data analysis, with emphasis on using the computer for managing data and for empirical modeling; functions for modeling real-world systems; critical thinking skills for analyzing arguments involving data; project management. Corequisite: GISAT 112 or permission of instructor.

GKIN 100. Lifetime Fitness and Wellness (2, 2)

3 credits

This course is designed to help students adopt and maintain the behaviors associated with an active and healthy lifestyle. Through this course students will learn the importance of maintaining wellness through a physically active lifestyle. Through lectures and labs, students study and develop the behavioral patterns consistent with the current knowledge base in fitness and wellness.

GMAD 150. Mediated Communication: Issues and Skills

3 credits

Study of how mediated communication shapes the content, meaning and impact of spoken, written and pictorial messages. Emphasis on the skills required to integrate speech, text and imagery into mediated presentations. Consideration of issues involving the critical evaluation of mass-mediated communication, their effectiveness and influence. Corequisites: GCOM 121E and GWRIT 102E.

GMATH 115. Environmental Mathematics

4 credits

A course emphasizing the nature of mathematical thinking and the relation between abstract concepts and real world problems. Special attention is given to applications in environmental science. Prerequisite or corequisite: GSCI 115.

GMUS 200. Music in General Culture

3 credits

Designed to increase the student’s perceptual ability in listening to music and to encourage an interest in both familiar and unfamiliar music. Primary study will be on music from the classic, western heritage. Folk, jazz, popular and non-Western music may also be considered. Meets fine arts general education requirement.

GMUS 203. Music in America

3 credits

Knowledge and skills to increase the student’s perceptual ability in music listening with a survey of American music; examining relationships between popular and classical music styles. Meets fine arts and American studies general education requirements.

GMUS 206. Introduction to Global Music

3 credits

A survey of various world music traditions, including those of Asia, the Pacific, Europe, Africa and the Americas. The course will focus on aesthetics, musical forms and styles, and the relationship between music and other arts. Emphasis will be placed on historical, religious and cultural events and their influence on the creation and development of music.

GPHIL 101. Introduction to Philosophy

3 credits

An introduction to the basic problems and concepts of philosophy-the nature of man and the self, ethics, theories of knowledge, philosophy of religion, etc. as revealed in the writings of the major philosophers.

GPHIL 120. Critical Thinking

3 credits

An introduction to the techniques for analyzing and evaluating information in everyday experience. The functions of language will be discussed. Techniques for judging the strengths of arguments and the probable truth of the arguments’ premises will be examined.

GPOSC 200. Global Politics

3 credits

An exploration of political, social and economic issues and structures existing within and between states in the contemporary global community. Students are introduced to alternative approaches to analyzing these issues in diverse cultures and political settings.

GPOSC 225. U.S. Government

4 credits

An examination of institutions, processes and intellectual concepts which structure American political activity. The interaction of the political system with the changing American society and America’s changing role in world affairs are also treated. The course provides an introduction to quantitative methodology.

GPSYC 101. General Psychology

3 credits

A study of the nervous system, sensation, perception, consciousness, learning, memory, language, intelligence, motivation, emotion, life span development, personality, psychopathology, psychotherapy, social psychology and the scientific method.

GPSYC 160. Life Span Human Development

3 credits

An introduction to human development. Emphasis is on life span processes within physical, emotional, cognitive, psychosexual, social, personality and moral development.

GREL 101. Religions of the World

3 credits

An investigation of the world’s major religions which will give attention to their origin, history, mythology and doctrines.

GSCI 101. Physics, Chemistry and the Human Experience (3, 0)

3 credits

A survey of the fundamental concepts, principles and ideas of chemistry and physics. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the development of the principles and their application in understanding the world around us. Prerequisite or corequisite: One of the following. MATH 103, MATH 107, MATH 205, MATH 220 or MATH 235.

GSCI 102. Environment: Earth (3, 0)

3 credits

A study of geological processes causing global change and their impact on human thought. The relationship between some geological processes and life on the Earth is also considered. Students having credit for GEOL 100 or its equivalent may not receive credit for GSCI 102. Not available for major or minor credit in geology. Prerequisite: GSCI 101.

GSCI 103. Discovering Life (3, 0)

3 credits

An introduction to major concepts in biology, with an emphasis on understanding science as a method for obtaining knowledge. Relationships between some biological and geological processes are also considered. Students having credit for BIO 101 may not receive credit for GSCI 103A. Not available for major or minor credit in biology. Prerequisite: GSCI 101.

GSCI 104. Scientific Perspectives (0, 2)

1 credit

A study of topics selected to allow students to participate in mathematical and scientific problem solving approaches to knowledge. Prerequisite or corequisite as indicated on ecampus.

GSCI 115. Earth Systems, Cycles and Human Impact

3 credits

Earth System science views the Earth as a single system consisting of processes operating at time scales from seconds to the age of the Earth. Earth System science integrates aspects of geology, meteorology, oceanography and biology in which humans are an integral part of the system. Earth System science provides an important tool for understanding the relationship between humans and the Earth. From the Earth Systems perspective, humans are a part of the Earth System, dependent on it, impacting it and responding to its variability. The systems of the Earth have been in dynamic equilibrium for billions of years, cycling matter, gases and energy through a set of complex reservoirs (atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, lithosphere and near space environment). During the last few thousand years, humans have assumed an even larger role in Earth processes. Prerequisite or corequisite: GMATH 115 or MATH 205E.

GSCI 116. Human Ecology

3 credits

An introduction to the study of humans (Homo sapiens) as part of the natural world, with important relationships with other species and subject to the natural laws that influence all life on earth. Human ecology is the study of humans in their environmental context and this course examines the ways that ecosystems, both natural and human-modified, have profoundly affected human biology both in the past and in the present. Interactions between human biology and the myriad environments in which they live (and have lived) are driven by the forces of evolution, and the emphasis here is on the ways that humans have adapted to environmental change. Prerequisite: GMATH 115 or MATH 205E and GSCI 115.

GSCI 121. The Physical Nature of Light and Sound (3, 1)

4 credits

A study of the physical properties of light and sound waves. Topics include production, propagation and spectral analysis of waves. Applications to be covered include musical instruments, sound reproduction, room acoustics, optical instruments (cameras, projectors, lasers) and color in art and nature. The course will include outside-of-class experiential activities.

GSCI 122. The Science of Vision and Audition (3, 1)

3 credits

A study of human interaction with sound and light waves. Topics include basic neuroanatomy, anatomy of the auditory and visual systems, visual perception (color vision, object perception, perceptual illusions), auditory perception (pitch, loudness, sound localization), visual deficiencies. The course will include outside-of-class experiential activities. Prerequisites: GSCI 121 and either MATH 103, MATH 107, MATH 205, MATH 220 or MATH 235.

GSCI 161. Science Processes

1 credit

Observing, classifying, measuring, inferring, communicating, predicting and experimenting in all science disciplines. This course will introduce core science process skills for all science disciplines in a hands-on, integrated laboratory block.

GSCI 162. The Science of the Planets

2 credits

The course will focus on the Earth and her neighbors, including the formation, evolution and dynamics of the Solar System. Students will also explore the similarities and differences of different solar system bodies (stars, planets, asteroids, comets) and the possibilities for finding life elsewhere. Prerequisite: GSCI 161.

GSCI 163. The Matter of Matter

1 credit

This course will focus on the topic of matter: particle theory, forms, characteristics, properties, atomic theory and models, conservation of mass and energy, nuclear reactions, heat transfer within matter, chemical bonds and chemical structures.

GSCI 164. How Things Work

2 credits

A hands-on conversation on how technology, science and engineering come together to produce the tools and devices we use. The course will cover many of the traditional concepts presented in an introductory physics course by probing the way things work. The course will treat coordinate systems and their use in describing motion, forces and energy conservation, thermodynamics (temperature, pressure, heat), light (color, ray model, wave model), waves (sound), magnetism, and electricity. The course will indirectly reinforce skills developed in other courses in the package including scientific tools (mathematics, graphing, diagramming, experimenting, and analyzing data) and using informational resources. Prerequisite: GSCI 163.

GSCI 165. The Way Life Works

1 credit

Patterns, energy, information, life’s machinery, feedback, community and evolution. These are major themes in how life works. This course will use these themes as a backdrop for looking at the way life works.

GSOCI 210. Social Issues in a Global Context

3 credits

An examination of current global social issues, such as industrialization, economy, work, inequality, social movements and socio-political change. Addresses questions of definition, nature, history, patterns and consequences of various issues, using sociological perspectives to examine and critique proposed social policies.

GSOCI 240. Individual in Society

3 credits

This course explores the importance of social structure, agency and symbolic interaction in the social construction of realities. It will examine major contributors to the sociological social psychological tradition. The course will help students reflect on issues such as self, self-presentation and identity, relationships, body, inequality, citizenship, nonconformity and resistance.

GTHEA 210. Introduction to Theatre

3 credits

Study of the theater as an art form. Emphasis on introducing students to a broad spectrum of theatrical activity and opinion. Consideration of the components that comprise a theater event including acting, directing, design, costuming, lighting and playwriting.

GWRIT 103. Critical Reading and Writing

3 credits

The course emphasizes the process of constructing a focused, logical, coherent, well-supported thesis, or point of view. The students will employ research and formal documentation to produce writing stylistically appropriate to its audience, purpose, and occasion. The course also places emphasis on editing for clarity and control of conventions. Instruction in writing and research includes critical analysis of primary and secondary sources through a series of reading and writing assignments. Students are prepared to use reading and writing in their personal, academic, and civic lives. GWRIT 103, or its equivalent, fulfills the General Education Cluster One writing requirement and is a prerequisite for all WRIT courses numbered 200 or above.


Geographic Science

Department of Integrated Science and Technology

GGEOG 200. Geography: The Global Dimension

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

This course promotes global understanding through the study of humans, their institutions and processes and the resulting interactions between humans and the environment. The course will include the study of western and non-western peoples and their social, cultural, political and economic relationships.

GEOG 210. Physical Geography (2, 2)

4 credits. Offered fall and spring

The physical aspects of man’s environment. World distributions of land forms, weather and climate, natural vegetation, soils, minerals and the interrelationships between these factors. Also considered are earth-sun relationships and map projections.

GEOG 215. Map Reading and Interpretation

3 credits

An introduction to a wide variety of maps used by the educator, layman and public official with critical analysis of various cartographic techniques used to represent and present information.

GEOG 230. Spatial Analysis

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

This course focuses on the theory and practice of spatial analysis. Research methods and quantitative techniques used in geographic analysis are presented. Topics include quantitative research design, the nature of spatial distributions, the use of maps as spatial models, univariate and bivariate analysis, spatial autocorrelation, index number development, point and area pattern analysis, shape and density measurement, the use of census data, and unobtrusive measures in geography.

GEOG 240. Natural Resource Conservation

3 credits. Offered fall

Examines the basic principles of resource use including geographic, economic, social and political processes. Explores concepts underlying such issues as resource consumption and conservation, environmental perception, resource and environmental conflict, population growth and control, carrying capacity and the evolution of the environmental movement.

GEOG 244. Introduction to Global Positioning Systems

1 credit. Offered spring

The course will provide basic training in the use of Global Positioning Systems. It will include instruction in the use of GPS field units, creation and use of data dictionaries, preplanning fieldwork, and post-processing of field data. This course is designed primarily for non-majors and will focus on the basics of using GPS so that students will be able to apply this knowledge and equipment in their own projects and independent studies within their own major.

GEOG 245. Global Positioning Systems

3 credits. Offered spring

The course will provide basic training in the use of Global Positioning Systems. It will include instruction in the use of GPS field units, creation and use of data dictionaries, preplanning fieldwork, and post processing of field data. The course will also include actual field projects and the use of mapping software.

GEOG 250. Agricultural Systems and Global Food Production

3 credits. Offered fall

This course concentrates on the geographic study of various agricultural systems and emphasizes how social, cultural and economic behavior and the physical environment influences global food production. Issues on the interconnection between world hunger, the place-to-place differences in farming practices, agricultural policies and the environment will be covered.

GEOG 265. Thematic Cartography (2, 2)

4 credits. Offered fall and spring

Thematic cartography introduces each student to basic cartographic theory and computer mapping techniques. Emphasis is placed on using maps for spatial analysis and geographic research. Using computer mapping software, students examine basic concepts of thematic map development, elementary cartometrics, map evaluation and map publication.

GEOG 280. Introduction to Cultural Geography

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

The course themes are human culture, cultural variations over the face of the earth and how these variations are related to selected global issues. Topics covered include world demographics, world religions and languages, patterns of human migration, political systems and human conflict, agricultural systems and impact on the physical world.

GEOG 285. Remote Sensing (2, 2)

4 credits. Offered fall and spring

The Remote Sensing class involves the study of the characteristics, quality, geometry and digital properties of remotely sensed aerial imagery. Methods of data collection, analysis, enhancement and presentation are discussed. Both the physical and cultural aspects of the imagery are examined. Prerequisite: GEOG 230.

GEOG 300. Population Geography

3 credits. Offered fall

An introduction to population measurement, sources of population data and modern population problems. Topics include distribution, the changing age structure and migration issues affecting the U.S. At the global scale topics include distribution, global migration patterns, the refugee crisis and prospects for feeding the rapidly increasing human population.

GEOG/GEOL 310. Environmental Issues

1-4 repeatable credits, no limit

Courses cover environmental issues such as air pollution, forest and wildlife management, water, resource management, soils and land use, and energy and the environment (among other topics). Courses examine the interface between humans and environmental systems while addressing the impact of social, economic and political systems and activities on the environment. May be repeated as course content changes.

GEOG 311. Endangered Environments

3 credits. Offered spring

In this course an investigation is made of a selected number of environmental problem areas around the world. Some examples include the temperate rainforest of Valdivia, South America, the tropical rainforests of Borneo and the Aral Sea of Eastern Europe. In this course, students will explore physical aspects of each environment and explore human impact and potential solutions to the problems.

GEOG 315. Field Studies in Geography

3 credits. Offered spring

This course exposes students to the methods and techniques commonly used by geographers while conducting fieldwork. The course will cover identifying and defining a researchable project, designing and testing data collection methods, and different methods of collecting, recording and presenting data. Students will also become familiar with various types of field equipment.

GEOG 311. Endangered Environments

3 credits. Offered spring

In this course an investigation is made of a selected number of environmental problem areas around the world. Some examples include the temperate rainforest of Valdivia, South America, the tropical rainforests of Borneo and the Aral Sea of Eastern Europe. In the course, students will explore physical aspects of each environment and explore human impact and potential solutions to the problems.

GEOG 335. Geography of Africa

3 credits. Offered spring

The physical environment, natural resources and human geographic patterns of Africa.

GEOG 336. Geography of North America

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

A study of the physical environment of North America followed by an analysis of the spatial structures of the area’s population and economy. The basis for the regional differentiation is considered, followed by a region-by-region analysis of each of these unique interactions of physical and cultural phenomenon.

GEOG 337. Geography of Latin America

3 credits. Offered spring

A study of countries in Latin America which includes their physical landforms, weather and climate, biogeography, natural resource base, attitudes toward the physical environment, characteristics of the economy, the current political role in international activities and population characteristics that include growth rate, distribution, migration and ethnicity.

GEOG 340. Biogeography

3 credits. Offered spring

Examines the distribution of plants and animals on Earth and the factors contributing to the existence and alteration of these patterns. The ecological and human processes shaping the natural environment are examined.

GEOG 344. Economic Geography and Development Issues

3 credits. Offered spring

An overview of the classification of economic activities, the factors involved in the location of various types of economic activities, and the regional variation in the standard of living associated with economic development. Additional topics include regional economic growth and types of economic systems and development perspectives, the roles that politics and demographics play in the economic development of a country, and the globalization of economic activities.

GEOG 346. Geography of Europe

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Geographic assessment of regional and national characteristics of the European nations.

GEOG 348. Russia and the Former U.S.S.R.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

A study of the people and culture of Russia with an emphasis on their social, economic and political processes and situation. An analysis of how the interaction of geographic, social, political and economic factors affect the lives of the Russian people.

GEOG 349. Geography of East Asia

3 credits. Offered fall

A survey of the physical and cultural environments of China, Taiwan, Japan, the Koreas, Indochina and the countries of Southeast Asia. Topics covered include weather and climate, physiography, natural resources, population characteristics, political systems, aspects of the economy and the role that each country plays on the regional and world stage.

GEOG 365. Advanced Thematic Cartography (2, 2)

4 credits. Offered spring

Using automated mapping techniques, statistical software and the World Wide Web, students will examine advanced cartographic design theory, thematic map construction and investigate the use of maps for conducting spatial analysis within the discipline of geography. Laboratory work will require students to reproduce a publishable-quality map for a client.

GEOG 366. Geographic Information Science

4 credits.Offered fall and spring

This lecture and lab course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of building a geographic information system. Computer-aided design is used to digitize, edit and plot spatial data. Attribute data and spatial data are combined in a GIS, and fundamental GIS functions are performed.

GEOG 380. Regional Geography Studies

3 credits. Offered once per academic year

Students will focus on one of 10 world regions (A-US/Canada; B-Latin American; C-Middle East/North Africa; D-Sub-Saharan Africa; E-Europe; F-Russia/Central Asia; G-East Asia; H-South Asia; I-Southeast Asia; J-Australia/Pacific). All students enrolled will meet with the instructor as a group once a week for discussion of general characteristics of world regions. Most work will be guided/independent.

GEOG 385. Advanced Remote Sensing (2, 2)

4 credits.Offered spring

The Advanced Remote Sensing class involves a continuation of the subject matter of the basic course, which is its prerequisite. The subject matters includes: advance georeferencing and orthocorrection, refined methods and applications of digital image enhancement, and image classification methodologies. These tools are applied to the inventory and assessment of various environmental conditions. Prerequisite: GEOG 285.

GEOG 390. Research Design

1 credit. Offered fall and spring

The first in a sequence of two courses designed to involve students in research projects. This course focuses on designing a research project. It is taken as an independent study during the semester preceeding the “Capstone” course (GEOG 490, GEOG 491 or GEOG 495).

GEOG 410. Urban Geography

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Study of the city in its geographic setting, giving perspective of modern urban problems, origin and growth of cities and influence of location on city functions. Looks at the internal structure of cities and the influence of the internal structure on its population groups.

GEOG 415. Climatology

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

The systematic study of the atmosphere with emphasis on such phenomena as temperature, pressure, humidity, air masses and fronts; the occurrence of these phenomena on a global basis; and a detailed survey of the worldwide distribution of climate types.

GEOG/ISAT 429. Sustainability: An Ecological Process

3 credits. Offered spring

This course examines present global environmental impacts and efforts made to change production and consumption patterns toward those that reduce impact on ecosystems or promote increased ecosystems health. The focus lies in understanding the basic resources of productivity including soils, agricultural systems, agroforestry, forestry, and aquatic environments and applying solutions on a personal and community level. Prerequisite: ISAT 320 or permission of instructor.

GEOG 440. Wilderness Techniques

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Wilderness legislation, legal mandates and wilderness issues are examined. Human impacts due to overuse or conflicting uses are studied, as are the philosophical aspects of wilderness ethics. This course is taught entirely in the field. Camping, hiking and permission of the instructor are required.

GEOG 441. Management and Protection of Natural Resources

3 credits. Offered fall

This course provides a managerial perspective for protection and management of natural resources. A systems approach for applied management strategies is provided for aquatic, terrestrial, threatened and endangered ecosystems. Topics include application of state, federal, international laws, regulations, policies and guidelines. Students develop management plans and explore jurisdictional resource protection issues.

GEOG 442. Wildlife Management

3 credits. Offered fall

An introductory discussion of applied management strategies for wildlife species and their ecological requirements is provided relative to human influences. Management techniques that are useful for determining population or health status are demonstrated for select vertebrate species. The evolution of wildlife laws, polices, and management strategies are addressed to provide relevant awareness into the appropriate concepts of wildlife management.

GEOG 450. Topics in Geography

1-3 credits

Examination of geographic topics that are of current interest. Can be repeated as course content changes.

GEOG 465. Applied Thematic Cartography

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Student performs and independent, client-based map project that addresses complex data visualization concepts and issues in thematic cartography. Students also explore issues such as: Responsibilities of the Cartographer to the Client, contracting Cartographic projects, cartographic communication models, cognitive issues in Cartographic Visualization, methods for disseminating Maps to Users, Modeling geographic phenomena with application to client-based problems, quality control scenarios when actualizing Cartographic projects, Legal Contract issues, and delivery issues with the completed Cartographic product. Prerequisite: GEOG 265.

GEOG 466. Managing GIS and Geographic Databases

4 credits. Offered once each academic year

An introduction to the creation, use and management of digital spatial data used by industry and government. Integration of large spatial data sets into the geographic information system, data management and data exchange, and the geodetic transformation of data sets are emphasized. Digital elevation models, land use data, population data, digital topographic map and street network data will be used. Prerequisite: GEOG 366.

GEOG 467. Selected Topics in Applied Geographic Information Systems

4 credits

The course advances the knowledge of GIS in theory and practice by focusing on specific application areas. Spatial databases and complex attribute data will be created and GIS modeling techniques will be used to solve problems relevant to the specified topical area. The course may be repeated once for additional credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite: GEOG 366.

GEOG 468. Internet Geographic Information Systems

4 credits. Offered spring

Theoretical and practical exploration of methods, standards and policies related to the development and utilization of geographic information systems on the Internet. Students will create and utilize distributed geospatial data and analytical systems using the world wide web and the Internet to address geographical problems. Prerequisite: GEOG 366.

GEOG 475. Political Geography

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Geopolitical conflicts and issues are examined. Concepts such as territoriality, nationalism, religious and ethnic struggle, environmental degradation and freedom and justice are discussed in the context of political unrest. Significant geopolitical theories and social and economic processes are explored.

GEOG 486. Applied Digital Image Processing

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

This course advances the knowledge and theory of digital image processing of remote sensed imagery. Analytical functions will be applied to projects relevant to further study and issues faced by clients. Prerequisite: GEOG 285 or GEOG 385.

GEOG 490. Special Studies in Geography

1-3 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring

Designed to give capable students in geography an opportunity to complete independent study under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Admission by recommendation of the instructor and permission of the department head.

GEOG 491. International Studies-Capstone

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

This course fulfills the capstone experience requirement for students majoring in geography. Students will make arrangements for the international experience. A research project or work-study project will be designed by the student and faculty member prior to departure. The research or work will be carried out in the country of travel.

GEOG 495. Internship in Geography

3-6 credits.Offered fall and spring

Practical experience in and observation of a public agency utilizing geographic methodology. Work experience will be supervised by an official of the agency and a faculty member. Periodic seminars and written reports are required. Prerequisites: Geography major of junior or senior standing with permission of department coordinator.

GEOG 499. Honors

6 credits. Offered fall and spring

Year course.


Geology

Department of Geology and Environmental Science

*GEOL 110. Physical Geology (3, 2)

4 credits. Offered fall and spring

A systematic study of earth materials including the internal and external processes that affect earth structure and landforms. Topics include the genesis/properties of rocks and minerals, plate tectonics and the agents of change that drive surface processes and land-form development.

GEOL 130. Quantitative Geology

2 credits. Offered once a year

An introduction to quantitative techniques used in descriptive and predictive aspects of the earth and environmental sciences, with emphasis on algorithmic approaches. The focus is on pragmatic application of mathematical methods to geologic problems, considering requirements, uses and limitations. Automatic computation is stressed.

GEOL 200. Evolutionary Systems. (3, 2)

4 credits. Offered fall and spring

An investment of a theoretical principle behind evolutionary systems of all types based on mathematical modeling in chaos, complexity theory, and artificial life studies with extensive computer experimentation and examples drawn from physical, chemical, biological, economic, and social systems. The purpose is to explore what is common and universal to all evolutionary processes.

GEOL 211. Introduction to Oceanography

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

An introduction to the oceanography of coastal environs including barrier islands, estuaries and tidal marshes. The physical, geological and biochemical characteristics of coastal waters will be discussed in the context of the economic and social pressures brought to bear on these areas by an increasing global population.

GEOL 220. Genetic Mineralogy (2, 2)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

A study of mineral genesis. Emphasis is directed toward mineralogical environments, mineral associations and the geology/mineralogy of classical localities. An appreciation of mineral value and aesthetics is incorporated throughout the course.

GEOL 230. Evolution of Earth (3, 2)

4 credits. Offered fall and spring

An introduction to the evidence, methods and assumptions used by scientists to unravel the earth’s origin and history. Emphasis on rock analysis/interpretation, modern and ancient processes of mountain building, origin and evolution of life and the history of the North American continent. Prerequisite: GEOL 110 or permission of instructor.

GEOL 272. Planetary Geology

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

A survey of currently developing ideas in planetology including origin of the planets, meteorites and planetary interiors. Also included are geologic processes and land forms on the moon and terrestrial planets, their modification under various planetary environments and analogies to familiar earth land forms. Prerequisite: GEOL 102 or GEOL 110.

GEOL 280. Mineralogy (3, 2)

4 credits. Offered fall and spring

A comprehensive study of minerals including: crystallography, mineral chemistry, x-ray diffraction, mineral optics with thin section recognition using petrographic microscope, and hand specimen identification of both silicate and non-silicate minerals. Prerequisite: GEOL 110.

GEOL 290. Optical Mineralogy (3, 2)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

A study of the optical properties of minerals and mineral identification with the petrographic microscope. Prerequisite: GEOL 280.

GEOL 300. Introduction to Petrology (3, 2)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

An introduction to the classification and origin of metamorphic and igneous rocks. Laboratory study of hand specimens and thin sections. Prerequisite: GEOL 280; Corequisite: CHEM 131.

GEOL/GEOG 310 A-D. Environmental Impact

2-3 credits, repeatable to 6 credits. Offered fall and spring

Focuses on a selected environmental realm. The course will examine the interface between human activities and environmental systems. It will address the impacts of social, economic and political activities on the environment. GEOL/GEOG 310 A-Atmosphere (air pollution); B-Biosphere (vegetation/wildlife); C-Hydrosphere (water); D-Lithosphere (geologic hazards/land issues).

GEOL 320. Meteorology

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

A survey of the science of weather including weather forecasting, weather maps and related atmospheric processes. Emphasis is placed on the dynamic aspects of meteorology and the interrelationships of atmospheric phenomena with land masses and the world ocean.

GEOL 340. Soils and Land Use (2, 2)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

The origin, distribution and properties of soils are emphasized in the lecture, laboratory and field. These aspects are used to determine the value of various soil types for such uses as agriculture, forestry, recreation, urban development and structural foundations. Prerequisites: GEOL 110 and CHEM 131.

GEOL/BIO 350. Invertebrate Paleontology (3, 2)

4 credits. Offered fall and spring

The history of nonvertebrate life from its origin, through evolving biogeochemical cycles, origin of eukaryotes and multicellularity, evolutionary records of all major groups and theoretical issues such as major group origins, adaptive radiation patterns, extinctions, functional adaptations and paleoecology. Prerequisite: GEOL 230, BIO 114 or permission of the instructor.

GEOL/CHEM 355. Geochemistry of Natural Waters

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Study of chemical theory and reactions important in natural water systems. The role of atmospheric, geologic and biological inputs in determining the geochemistry of streams, rivers and oceans. Prerequisites: CHEM 131 and CHEM 132 or equivalent.

GEOL 364. Stratigraphy and Basin Analysis (3, 3)

4 credits. Offered fall and spring

Lecture emphasizes application of sedimentologic and stratigraphic principles to identifying and interpreting depositional systems and examines how eustasy (sequence theory) and local tectonics influence the distribution of depositional systems under different plate tectonic regimes. Lab emphasizes critical field observation, application of theory to stratigraphic analysis and writing scientific papers. Prerequisite: GEOL 230.

GEOL 365. Structural Geology (3, 2)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Major and minor structures of the earth’s crust. Mechanical principles involved in folding, faulting, jointing and penecontemporaneous structures. The causes and results of mountain building processes. Preparation and interpretation of geologic maps. Prerequisite: GEOL 110; GEOL 230 recommended.

GEOL 380. Regional Geography Studies

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Students will focus on one of 10 world regions (A-US/Canada; B-Latin America; C-Middle East/North Africa; D-Sub-Saharan Africa; E-Europe; F-Russia/Central Asia; G-East Asia; H-South Asia; I-Southeast Asia; J-Australia/Pacific). All student enrolled will meet with the instructor as a group once a week for discussion of general characteristics of world regions. Most work will be guided/independent.

GEOL 385. Geomorphology (2, 2)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

The description, classification, analysis, origin and evolution of land forms. The physical and chemical processes that have formed the present landscape. Advanced interpretation of topographic maps. (This course is required by the U.S. Civil Service Commission for employment as a geologist in the federal government.) Prerequisite: GEOL 110 or GEOG 210.

GEOL 390. Laboratory Techniques in Geology (2, 2)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

An elective course for science majors. A study of the basic theories and techniques of laboratory methods and instrumentation. Implementation and application of techniques to geological problems. Prerequisites: GEOL 280 and permission of the instructor.

GEOL/MATS 395. Geologic Perspectives in Materials Science & Engineering

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

A one-semester course which emphasizes the commonalities between the geological sciences and materials science. Course includes topics from mineralogy, crystallography, petrology and structural geology which are also important in metallurgy and ceramics. Prerequisites: An introductory course in any physical science or integrated science and technology (GEOL 110, CHEM 131, PHYS 140 or ISAT 141) and at least one additional advanced course in the major.

GEOL/MATS 396. X-ray Characterization of Solid Materials

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Covers fundamental principles and theory behind two powerful, X-ray based, technologies: X-ray Diffraction and Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-rays (EDS). Students will collect and analyze data from a single crystal Gandolfi X-ray camera, automated powder diffraction system (focusing goniometer), and EDAX system (EDS). Prerequisites: GEOL 280 or MATS/CHEM/PHYS 275 or ISAT 300.

GEOL 399. Field Geology

6 credits. Offered fall and spring

Field methods include use of Brunton compass, telescopic alidade and plane table and compass traversing. A synthesis of geologic concepts and principles leading to the construction and interpretation of geologic and topographic maps. Prerequisites: GEOL 364 and GEOL 365 or permission of the instructor.

GEOL/BIO 405. Vertebrate Paleontology (3, 1)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

A study of the origin and evolution of the vertebrates. Emphasis will be on understanding how the processes of earth evolution and biological evolution have interacted through time to produce a coherent picture of vertebrate history. Prerequisite: GEOL 230, BIO 124 or permission of the instructor.

GEOL 410. Engineering Geology (2, 2)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Study of the applications of geology to engineering practice. Topics include soil mechanics, foundations, engineering classification of soils, slope stability and mineral aggregates. Prerequisites: GEOL 340 and MATH 205 or MATH 235 or equivalent.

GEOL 415. Geological Evolution of North America

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

A systematic survey of the tectonic evolution of the North American continent and the corresponding evolution of depositional basins and paleoenvironments. Prerequisites: GEOL 364 and GEOL 365 or permission of the instructor.

GEOL 440. Geophysics (3,2)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

A survey of applied geophysical methods, with particular attention to shallow subsurface investigations. Topics include gravity, magnetics, electrical and electromagnetic techniques, and seismology and ground-penetrating radar. Practical experience with data acquisition, reduction, and interpretation. Prerequisites: GEOL 110 and two semesters of calculus or permission of the instructor.

GEOL 444. Topics in Geophysics

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

An in-depth investigation into selected aspects of geophysics. Topics will be chosen by the instructor and students, and may vary from year to year. Some common candidate issues include earthquake seismology, field survey planning and execution, geophysical interpretation theory, and the geophysical underpinnings of plate tectonic theory. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

GEOL 450. Geology Seminar

1 credit. Offered fall and spring

An in-depth study of a particular problem in geology (e.g., plate tectonics, astrogeology, low-temperature geochemistry, etc.) Scientific literature will be reviewed and discussed. Prerequisite: 20 credits in geology.

GEOL 460. Hydrogeology (2, 2)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Basic concepts of subsurface water as a part of the hydrologic cycle. Topics include storativity and permeability in porous media, principles of flow, computer applications, groundwater exploration, mapping and environmental aspects of groundwater. Prerequisites: GEOL 110 and two semesters of calculus or permission of the instructor.

GEOL 489. Quantitative Methods in Geology (3)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

An introduction to the mathematical methods and statistical techniques that are employed by scientists in the disciplines of geochemistry, geophysics, hydrology, and the petroleum/mineral industry. The course provides the quantitative skills necessary to manipulate geological data.

GEOL 491. Geological Literature Research

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Provides instruction in the definition of a geological problem, sources and strategies for a literature search and the preparation of both written and oral reports. Prerequisites: Geology major (senior standing) and permission of the instructor.

GEOL 494. Internship in Geology

1-3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Student conducts a research or applied project in geology outside of the university. Requires an approved proposal prior to registration and a final report at the culmination of the project. Prerequisites: Minimum of 8 credit hours in Geology and a Geology GPA of 2.5 or higher.

GEOL 497. Problems in Geology

1-3 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring

An undergraduate research course in one of the fields of geology. Open to advanced students who have adequate preparation. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

GEOL 499. Honors in Geology

6 credits. Offered fall and spring

Three semester sequence. Required 3.25 GPA or higher.


German

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures

GER 101-102. Elementary German (4, 1)

4 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring

The fundamentals of German through listening, speaking, reading and writing. Practice in pronunciation and development of comprehension. One hour’s work a week in the language laboratory.

GER 111-112. Intensive German

6 credits each term. Offered May and summer

The fundamentals of German through listening, speaking, reading and writing. The first semester is the equivalent to GER 101-102 and the second is equivalent to GER 231-232.

GER 231-232. Intermediate German

3 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring

A thorough review of grammar, vocabulary building, conversation, composition and reading. Prerequisite: One year of college German or equivalent.

GER 265. German Literature of the 18th and 19th Centuries in Translation

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

A survey of German literature of the 18th and 19th centuries, with an emphasis on Classicism and Romanticism. All lectures and readings are in English. Does not count toward a major, minor or licensure in German.

GER 266. Contemporary German Literature in Translation

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

German literature from the 1920s to the present. All lectures and readings are in English. Does not count toward a major, minor or licensure in German.

GER 300. German Conversation and Communication

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Intensive training in grammatical structures and their application to oral and written communication. Instruction is in German. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirements for the major. Prerequisite: GER 232 or equivalent.

GER 307. A History of German Civilization

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

A study of society, economics, politics and the arts in central Europe from Indo-European beginnings to the 1900s. Emphasis is also placed on outstanding contributions of German-speaking people. Instruction is in German. Prerequisite: GER 300.

GER 308. Contemporary German Civilization

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

A study of life, culture, politics and economics in modern Germany. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: GER 300.

GER 320. German Oral and Written Communication

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Intensive training in the use of modern, everyday German with emphasis on conversation and composition. Readings in German will provide a context for discussion and writing. Prerequisite: GER 300 or equivalent.

GER 330. Business German

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

A study of commercial and trade vocabulary and customs in conjunction with practice in commercial communication, including letter writing, interviews and interpretation. Instruction is in German. Prerequisite: GER 300.

GER/TR 341. German-English Technical/Commercial Translation

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

German-English translation applied in several commercial (i.e. marketing, finance) and technical (i.e. electricity and electronics, software, hardware) fields. Focus will be on the acquisition of specialized knowledge (both linguistic and extralinguistic) and the delivery of professional documents in real-market conditions. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major. Prerequisites: TR 300 and GER 330, or permission of the instructor.

GER 400. Advanced Conversation

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Discussions deal with topics of current interest. Prerequisite: GER 300 or equivalent.

GER 405. The Age of German Classicism

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Reading and interpretation of significant works of Lessing, Schiller and Goethe. Instruction is in German. Prerequisite: Three years of college German or equivalent.

GER 415. German Romanticism and Realism

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

A study of romanticism and realism with emphasis on romantic poetry and the realistic novel. Instruction is in German. Prerequisite: Three years of college German or equivalent.

GER 426. Modern German Literature

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

A study of the works of major German writers of the 20th century. Instruction is in German. Prerequisite: Three years of college German or equivalent.

GER/ENG 436. Studies in German Literature

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

A study of selected works of German literature. Instruction is in English. May be repeated for credit when course content changes.


Gerontology

Department of Social Work

GERN/SOCI 280. Social Gerontology

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of aging. The course provides an overview of issues surrounding aging in contemporary society: personal, familial, communal and societal.

GERN 305. Programs and Services for the Elderly

3 credits. Offered fall

A review of the programs and services provided for the elderly in the public and private sectors of America. Observations and participation in local programs for the elderly will be required. Prerequisite: GERN/SOCI 280.

GERN/SOWK 325. Positive Aging: Elderhostel

3 credits. Offered summer

In this academic course and outreach program, JMU students are co-participants and co-learners with adults 55 and over attending the JMU Elderhostel.

GERN/FAM/SOWK 375. Grant Writing for Agencies

3 credits. Offered on a rotating basis

A collaborative course, which emphasizes active learning, teaches basic skills on proposal writing. Students and agency representatives learn the importance of grant writing for agencies/organizations and research projects often needed to complete graduate education. There is a potential for a grant submission by the end of the semester.

GERN 400. Skills and Techniques in Gerontological Assessment

3 credits.Offered spring

The study of the skills and techniques used in assessing the elderly client. Assessment is made from the holistic approach: physical, psychological and social. Prerequisite: GERN/SOCI 280.

GERN 487. Special Topics in Gerontology

3 credits. Offered on a rotating basis

Examination of selected topics in gerontology that are of current importance in the field of gerontology. Course may be repeated for credit.

GERN 490. Special Studies in Gerontology

1-3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Independent study in gerontology under faculty supervision. Limited to gerontology minors. Can be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: GERN/SOCI 280, GERN 305 and GERN 400 or permission of instructor.

GERN 495. Field Experience/Seminar in Gerontology (1, 6)

3 credits. Offered fall, spring and summer

Supervised field experience in gerontology settings that allows observation and experience with the well and frail elderly. A minimum of six hours in the assigned setting each week and one hour seminar on campus. Prerequisites: GERN/SOCI 280, GERN 305 and GERN 400, major elective and approval of the gerontology minor adviser.


Graphic Design

School of Art and Art History

GRPH 243. Computer Graphics (0, 6)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Introduction to graphics on the computer. Students will explore hardware and software that relate to the presentation of graphic design projects and computer generated imaging. Prerequisites: ART 140 and ART 160 or permission of the instructor.

GRPH 244. Design Methodology (0, 9)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Exploration of strategies for conceptualizing, analyzing and solving design problems. Emphasis is placed on graphic presentation of ideas and the creative process. Prerequisite: ART 140.

GRPH 246. Introduction to Typography (0, 9)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Introduction to the study of letter-forms for their aesthetic and communicative value. Emphasis will be placed on the form and function of basic type including a fundamental understanding of electronic prepress. Prerequisite: GRPH 243.

GRPH 250. Portfolio Review

0 credit. Offered fall and spring

Portfolio review required to enroll in Graphic Design courses at upper division standing. May be repeated once for pass/fail standing. Prerequisites: GRPH 243, GRPH 244. Corequisite: GRPH 246.

GRPH/SMAD 339. Web Design

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Introduction to Web design through theory and practical application. Assignments will focus on the unique form, content and structures associated with designing for the World Wide Web. Special emphasis on the creative process and the graphic presentation of ideas. Prerequisites: GRPH majors, GRPH 250; SMAD majors, GRPH 243.

GRPH 345. Advertising Design (0, 9)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Through theory and practical application, the student learns to communicate a message using advertising design principles, the creative process and the message/client/consumer relationship. Prerequisite: GRPH 250.

GRPH 346. Intermediate Typography (0, 9)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Continued study of letter-forms for their aesthetic and communicative value. Emphasis will be placed on historical and sociological issues. Prerequisite: GRPH 250.

GRPH 347. Package Design (0, 9)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Through theory, demonstrations and practical application students learn to design in three-dimensions. Focus will be placed on aesthetics, as well as the form and function of a product’s housing. Prerequisite: GRPH 250.

GRPH 349. Illustration (0, 9)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Through demonstrations, theory and practical application, students are introduced to numerous media and illustrative techniques. Encouraged experimentation is tempered by an understanding of problem solving and conceptualization. Prerequisite: GRPH 250.

GRPH/ART/ARTH/INDE 389. Topics in Art, Art History, Graphic Design and Interior Design

3 credits. Offering varies

Study of selected topics in art, art history, graphic design or interior design at the intermediate level. May be repeated when course content changes. See e-campus for current topics. Prerequisite: GRPH 250 for Graphic Design topics.

GRPH/ART/ARTH/INDE 390. Independent Studies in Art, Art History, Graphic Design and Interior Design

1-3 credits. Offering varies

Independent activity at the intermediate level, such as research or studio practice, under faculty supervision. Projected students in any are of the school’s offering must be arranged with the instructors who will direct them. Offered only with the consent of the director. Prerequisite: GRPH 250 for GRPH 290.

GRPH 446. Advanced Typography (0, 9)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Advanced study of letter-forms for their aesthetic and communicative value. Emphasis will be placed on creative solutions reflecting knowledge of contemporary typography and design issues. Prerequisite: GRPH 346.

GRPH 447. Type and Image (0, 9)

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

This course emphasizes creative solutions of type and image in visual communication. Prerequisite or corequisite: GRPH 446.

GRPH/ART/ARTH/INDE 489. Topics in Art, Art History, Graphic Design and Interior Design

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Study of selected topics in art, art history, graphic design or interior design at the advanced level. May be repeated when course content changes. See e-campus for current topics.

GRPH/ART/ARTH/INDE 490. Independent Studies in Art, Art History, Graphic Design or Interior Design

1-3 credits, repeatable. Offered fall and spring

Independent activity, such as research or studio practice, under faculty supervision. Projected studies in any area of the school’s offering must be arranged with the instructors who will direct them. Offered only with consent of the director. Prerequisite: GRPH 250 for GRPH 490.

GRPH/ART/ARTH 495. Internship in Art or Art History or Graphic Design

1-8 credits. Offered fall and spring

An off-campus program prepared and monitored on an individual basis. Internships are designed to provide practical experience in the arts. ARTH 494 is a prerequisite for internships in museums and galleries. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and director. ARTH 494 for ART/ARTH 495 in museums and galleries. GRPH 250 for GRPH 495.

GRPH 498. Graphic Design Portfolio

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

An examination of the business of graphic design, employment strategies and freelance opportunities. Focus is placed on solidification of the portfolio for employment and/or graduate school. This course is strongly recommended for the last semester prior to graduation. Prerequisite: GRPH 446. Corequisite: GRPH 447.

GRPH/ART/ARTH 499. Honors (1, 3 , 2)

6 credits total for three semesters. Offered fall and spring

Prerequisite: GRPH 250 for GRPH 499.


Greek

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures

GRK 101-102. Elementary Greek

4 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring

Designed to provide a reading knowledge of Classical Greek as well as New Testament koine. Greek life, thought and culture are stressed. Especially recommended for science, English and philosophy majors.

GRK 231-232. Intermediate Greek

3 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring

An intensive reading course. Selections from Classical Greek writers and/or the New Testament. Prerequisite: One year of college Greek or equivalent.