Accounting

Anthropology

Africana Studies

Art

AIRS

Art History

American Studies

Athletic Training Education

Program


Accounting

College of Business

ACTG 301. Financial Reporting and Statement Analysis

3 credit. Offered fall and spring.

This class provides the foundation to analyze, interpret, and use finanical statements effectively, emphasizing the use of technology including advanced spreadsheet techniques and Internet research. It also includes discussions with professionals addressing various roles of accountants in business, government, and capital markets. Prerequisites: Completion of both COB 241 and COB 242 with grades of "B-" or better. Prerequisite or corequisite: COB 300.

ACTG 313. Accounting Information Systems

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Covers the use of computers as tools for the collection, organization, analysis and reporting of accounting data. Topics include: Internal controls, documentation of accounting systems, transaction processing cycles, auditing information technology, e-commerce, enterprise resource planning systems, computer and information systems security and integration of business functions in the accounting process. Prerequisites or corequisites: ACTG 301 and ACTG 343.

ACTG 343. Corporate Financial Reporting I

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Provides a theoretical framework to explain and critically evaluate financial reporting in a global environment. In addition to studying the authoritative standards for preparing financial statements, students develop the ability to read, use, analyze and interpret financial statements. Students gain an understanding that managers can shape the financial information communicated to investors and creditors. Computing technology is incorporated to facilitate business decision-making. Prerequisites: Completion of both COB 241 and COB 242 with grades of “B-” or better. Prerequisite or corequisite: COB 300 and ACTG 301.

ACTG 344. Corporate Financial Reporting II

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Continues the development of a theoretical framework to read, use, analyze, interpret, explain and critically evaluate financial reporting in a global environment. Selected topics include financial instruments, leases, pensions, deferred taxes, stockholders’ equity and other corporate reporting issues. Computing technology is incorporated to facilitate business decision-making. Prerequisite: ACTG 343 with a grade of “C-” or better.

ACTG 377. Federal Income Tax Accounting

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Designed to introduce students to the federal income tax system, including individual and business entity taxation. Topics include income, exclusions, deductions and property transactions. Also facilitates development of research, communication and technology skills. Prerequisite: COB 300.

ACTG 410. Auditing

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A study of techniques available for gathering, summarizing, analyzing and interpreting the data presented in financial statements and procedures used in verifying the fairness of the information. Also emphasizes ethical and legal aspects and considerations. Prerequisites: ACTG 313 and ACTG 343 with grades of “C-” or better. Prerequisite or corequisite: ACTG 344.

ACTG 420. Operational Auditing

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

This course is a study of the basic principles and techniques of operational auditing. It covers organizing and conducting operational audit engagements and addresses regulatory compliance issues. Prerequisites: ACTG 313 and ACTG 343 with grades of “C-” or better. Prerequisite or corequisite: ACTG 344.

ACTG 440. Advanced Information Technology for Accountants

3 credits. Offered spring

Continuation of ACTG 313 for AIS concentration students. Topics include telecommunications, distributed processing, networking, EDP auditing, systems security and system design fundamentals, taught from an accounting perspective. Prerequisite: ACTG 313 with a grade of “C-” or better.

ACTG 445. Selected Accounting and Reporting Topics

3 credits. Offered fall and spring

Focuses on the development and use of financial information as it relates to business combinations, governmental and public not-for-profit entities, and transactions and statements denominated in foreign currencies. In the context of the global accounting environment, students critically evaluate U.S. generally accepted accounting principles as they pertain to the topics covered. Prerequisite: ACTG 343 with a grade of “C-” or better.

ACTG 450. Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting and Reporting

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Focuses on budgeting, accounting, and financial reporting principles associated with private and public nonprofit organizations. Includes survey of state, local, municipal, and federal government accounting. Prerequisites: ACTG 343 with grade of “C-” or better. Prerequisite or corequisite: ACTG 344.

ACTG 475. Accounting Decision Making and Control

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

The study of cost accounting concepts and information used by business organizations to make strategic, organizational and operational decisions. Topics include the role of planning and control in attaining organizational goals and objectives; the relationship among cost structure, cost behavior and operating income; traditional and activity-based costing approaches to product costing; differential analysis in decision making; and ethical issues for accountants. Students will also engage in activities designed to enhance technological and communication skills. Prerequisite: COB 300.

ACTG 483. International Accounting and Financial Reporting

3 credits. Offered fall.

Designed to develop a fundamental knowledge of the assumptions, environmental considerations and techniques underlying the collection and reporting of financial information on an international scale. Prerequisites: COB 300, open to non-Accounting majors only.

ACTG 490. Special Studies in Financial Accounting

1-3 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring.

Designed to give capable students in accounting an opportunity to do independent study under faculty supervision. Admission only by recommendation of the instructor and permission of the director. Forms obtained in department office before registration.

ACTG 491.Special Studies in Systems and Technology

1-3 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring.

Designed to give capable students in accounting an opportunity to do independent study under faculty supervision in the area of systems and technology. Prerequisites: Recommendation of the instructor and permission of the director.

ACTG 492. Special Studies in Tax

1-3 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring.

Designed to give capable students in accounting an opportunity to do independent study under faculty supervision in the area of tax. Prerequisite: Recommendation of the instructor and permission of the director.

ACTG 493. Special Studies in Cost

1-3 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring.

Designed to give capable students in accounting an opportunity to do independent study under faculty supervision in the area of cost. Prerequisite: Recommendation of the instructor and permission of the director.

ACTG 494. Business Practicum

3-6 credits. Offered fall, spring and summer.

A course, taken by graduating seniors, to give students an opportunity to work in and with local industry to gain insight into the real side of modern business. Forms obtained in accounting office before registration. Grades will be assigned on a credit/no credit basis.

ACTG 499. Honors

6 credits. Year course. Offered fall and spring.

See catalog section entitled “Graduation with Distinction” and “Graduation with Honors.”


Africana Studies

College of Arts and Letters

AFST 200. Introduction to Africana Studies.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An introductory survey of basic theoretical concepts to analyze the Black experience, with special focus on the general historical process common to Africa and the African Diaspora.

AFST 489. Africana Studies Senior Research Experience.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

In this reserach-oriented experience, students design and complete research projects relevant to their interests in Africana Studies, as well as connect their projects to previous course work and experiences within the Africana Studies minor. Prerequisites: AFST 200, senior standing and permission of instructor.


AIRS

College of Education and Psychology

AIRS 001. Leadership Laboratory.

0 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course is a mandatory laboratory in leadership and followership development for AFROTC cadets. As a complement to the air science classes, this laboratory focuses on applying leadership principles and understanding leaders’ responsibilities while emphasizing the benefits of practical experience. JMU students will take AFROTC classes at the University of Virginia for JMU credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Corequisite: Any Air Force ROTC class.

AIRS 110. The Foundations of the United States Air Force.

1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

This course introduces the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps. Topics include mission and organization of the Air Force, Officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer opportunities and communication skills. JMU students will take AFROTC classes at the University of Virginia for JMU credit. Students interested in joining Air Force ROTC should also register for AIRS 001- Leadership Laboratory. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

AIRS 120. The Foundations of the United States Air Force.

1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

This course introduces the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps. Topics include mission and organization of the Air Force, Officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer opportunities and communication skills. JMU students will take AFROTC classes at the University of Virginia for JMU credit. Students interested in joining Air Force ROTC should also register for AIRS 001- Leadership Laboratory. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

AIRS 210. The Evolution of Air and Space Power.

1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

This course examines general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective, from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space age global positioning systems of the Persian Gulf War. Topics include Principles of War, Tenets of Air and Space Power, historical Air Force leaders, and employment of air and space power. JMU students will take AFROTC classes at the University of Virginia for JMU credit. Students interested in joining Air Force ROTC should also register for AIRS 001- Leadership Laboratory. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

AIRS 220. The Evolution of Air and Space Power.

1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

This course examines general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective, from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space age global positioning systems of the Persian Gulf War. Topics include Principles of War, Tenets of Air and Space Power, historical Air Force leaders, and employment of air and space power. JMU students will take AFROTC classes at the University of Virginia for JMU credit. Students interested in joining Air Force ROTC should also register for AIRS 001- Leadership Laboratory. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

AIRS 310. Concepts of Air Force Leadership and Management.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course studies leadership, management fundamentals, and professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and communication skills required of Air Force junior officers. The class examines Air Force leadership and management situations, using case studies as a means of demonstrating and applying the concepts under consideration. JMU students will take AFROTC classes at the University of Virginia for JMU credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.


AIRS 320. Concepts of Air Force Leadership and Management.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course studies leadership, management fundamentals, and professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and communication skills required of Air Force junior officers. The class examines Air Force leadership and management situations, using case studies as a means of demonstrating and applying the concepts under consideration. JMU students will take AFROTC classes at the University of Virginia for JMU credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

AIRS 410. National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Topics include the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting the military profession. JMU students will take AFROTC classes at the University of Virginia for JMU credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

AIRS 420. National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Topics include the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting the military profession. JMU students will take AFROTC classes at the University of Virginia for JMU credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.


American Studies

College of Arts and Letters

GAMST 200. Introduction to American Studies.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This interdisciplinary course examines representations of America and American identity in philosophy, literature and the arts. We investigate conflicts in values and beliefs as shaped by class, gender, race, landscape, and “progress.” Students will articulate an informed understanding of their own position in the development of America’s national and international identity.

AMST 490. Special Studies in American Studies.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Independent study of a topic appropriate to the interdisciplinary method of American studies.


Anthropology

Department of Sociology and Anthropology

KEY
A=Archaeology     |     F=Field Experience
B=Biological Anthropology     |     R=Required for all anthropology majors
C=Cultural Anthropology     |     W=Writing Intensive

GANTH 195. Cultural Anthropology.

3 credits (C,R). Offered fall and spring.

An introduction to the nature of culture and its relationship to language, economics, politics, kinship and other institutions in diverse cultures. The course also provides an overview of the theories, methods and ethical responsibilities involved in the study of cultural systems and ethnographic writing.

ANTH 196. Biological Anthropology.

3 credits (B,R). Offered fall and spring.

An introduction to the origins, evolution and genetic variability of humans and their relationship to nonhuman primates. Examination of the fossil record, the relationship between biology and culture and human genetics are included. Theories and methods used in the study of biological anthropology are also introduced.

ANTH 197. Archaeology.

3 credits (A,R). Offered fall and spring.

An introduction to archaeology through a survey of the major developments in human cultural evolution, focusing on the transition from foraging to agricultural and state-level systems. An examination of the origins and nature of Old and New World civilizations and an overview of archaeological methods and theories are also included.

ANTH 250. Anthropology of the American Southwest.

3 credits. Offered fall.

This course examines the development of Southwestern societies from early hunter-gatherers to the Native American communities of today. Major issues of anthropological interest, such as the adoption of agriculture, the development of village life, migration and abandonment, the spread of religious "cults," the extent of Mesoamerican influence, and the effects of the Spanish conquest are explored.

ANTH 265. Peoples and Cultures of Latin America and the Caribbean.

3 credits(C). Offered every three semesters.

Anthropological and historical perspectives on the cultures of Latin America and the Caribbean through such themes as colonialism, nationalism, ethnicity, development, aesthetic traditions, gender, religion, and urban and rural resistance movements.

ANTH 280. Peoples and Cultures of Sub-Saharan Africa.

3 credits. (C) Offered fall.

This is an introductory course emphasizing cultural diversity of sub-Saharan African societies. Basic anthropological concepts are used in analyzing African economics, political systems, marriage patterns and family organization, religious beliefs, and the impacts of colonialism and postcolonial development practices.

ANTH 300. Anthropology of Diet and Nutrition.

3 credits. (B,C) Offered every three semesters.

An evolutionary and cross-cultural perspective on diet and nutrition in human populations. Focus on how and why people choose what to eat, the range and significance of cross-cultural variability in diet, how diets have changed in the evolutionary and recent past and the health and social significance of those changes. Prerequisite: Any lower-level course in anthropology or permission of the instructor.

ANTH 310. Prehistoric and Pioneer Virginia.

3 credits (A) Offered fall.

A study of the development and diversity of Indian society in Virginia, the initial European settlement and westward expansion. Economic and social problems of initial settlement and the interaction between European and Indian cultures is emphasized.

ANTH 312. The Native Americans.

3 credits (C) Offered every three semesters.

A study of the nature of Indian societies occupying different environmental areas of North America at the time of earliest historic contact. Indian groups such as Shawnee, Mandan, Nuunamiut, Natchez, Creek, Iroquois and Sioux will be considered.

ANTH/SOCI 313. Processes of Social and Cultural Change.

3 credits (A,C). Offered spring.

Investigates the procedures through which a society operates and the manner in which it introduces and incorporates changes. Issues considered include belief, innovation, directed change, coercive change, revitalization and revolution.

ANTH 315. Human Evolution.

3 credits (B). Offered occasionally.

An examination of the evidence for the emergence of humans and the factors which influenced it. Includes a review of fossil and artifact evidence for biological and cultural evolution.

ANTH 325. Aztec, Maya and Their Predecessors.

3 credits (A,C). Offered every two semesters.

Survey of the Olmec, Toltec, Teotihuacan, Maya and Aztec civilizations and the factors leading to their development, persistence and decline.

ANTH 327. Ancient North American Civilizations.

3 credits (A). Offered every three semesters.

Studies the emergence of Native American societies prior to historic contact. Emphasizes prehistoric developments in the eastern United States.

ANTH/HIST 331. Historical Archaeology.

3 credits (A). Offered spring.

The course introduces students to the purposes, subject matter, methodology, and historical background of the discipline of historical archaeology. Building on research issues and methodologies of anthropological archaeology and history, the multidisciplinary aspects of this field are introduced through field trips, projects, guest lectures, readings and classroom presentations. Prerequisite: ANTH 197 or HIST equivalent.

ANTH 340. Race, Nation and Culture.

3 credits (C). Offered every three semesters.

Comparative study of the historical and cultural construction of "race," "ethnicity" and "nation." Uses recent anthropological approaches to examine how those identities are related and why they serve as the basis for social movements, conflicts and inequalities around the world.

ANTH 350. Magic, Witchcraft and Religion.

3 credits (C). Offered fall.

Anthropological study of religion in society. The influence of religion on the development of social, legal, governmental and economic aspects of culture is emphasized.

ANTH/SOCI 352. Birth, Death, Sex: Exploring Demography.

3 credits (B,C). Offered every three semesters.

Fertility (birth) and mortality (death) and their biological and social determinants in cross-cultural and evolutionary/historical frameworks. Exploration of the dynamic between the material constraints on and symbolic significance of, reproduction, sexuality and death within a cultural context. Critical examination of population growth as a global "problem." Basic demographic methods. Prerequisite: Any lower-level course in anthropology or sociology or permission of the instructor.

ANTH 355. Culture and Ecology.

3 credits (C). Offered spring

A comparative study of cultures from an ecological perspective. The course focuses on the effects of climate, environment and population interaction on shaping and determining human behavior. Basic ecological concepts and theories are introduced as they relate to the study and explanation of human behavior.

ANTH 360. Medical Anthropology.

3 credits (B,C). Offered every three semesters.

The evolutionary, ecological and socio-cultural context of health and disease. A multi-level, cross-cultural exploration of disease including genetic and macro-level social inputs. Topics include Darwinian medicine, cultural ecology of infectious disease, including emergent diseases, the biology of poverty, maternal-child health and the history of global health problems. Prerequisite: GANTH 195, ANTH 196 or permission of the instructor.

ANTH 364. U.S./Latin American Borders.

3 credits (C). Offered every three semesters.

This course examines the experiences of Latin American migrants to the United States. It stresses the cultural expression of those experiences, globalization and its effects on local communities in Latin America, the U.S. responses to migration and migrants. Prerequisite: One course on Latin America.

ANTH 366. Anthropology of War.

3 credits. Offered every three semesters.

This course examines the causes, conduct, and consequences of warfare in non-state societies using both ethnographic and archaeological data. Case studies drawn from throughout the world are used to examine topics such as the co-evolution of war and society, the impact of colonialism on native warfare, the process of making peace, and claims about the biological "inevitability" of war.

ANTH/SOCI 368. Contemporary American Culture.

3 credits (C). Offered occasionally.

This course analyzes contemporary American society in relationship to popular cultural formations and representations. Cultural expressions founds in music, literature, threatre, film, television, cyberspace and sports will be examined with respect to values, sentiments, identity constructions and lived experiences of differentially situated social actors.

ANTH 370. Topics in the Anthropology of Gender.

3 credits (C). Offered every three semesters.

This course examines the many ways in which gender is constructed and negotiated in different historical and social contexts. Topics will vary with the instructor to include both cultural and biocultural perspectives.

ANTH 373. Anthropological Perspectives on Environment and Development.

3 credits (C). Offered spring.

This seminar provides a history of key ideas and figures in environmental anthropology, as well as examines why this field is, by necessity, interdisciplinary. Within this context, we will use specific case studies to examine ways in which the concepts and theories of "development" and "environment" have been produced, perpetuated, manipulated, and challenged in different geographic and politico-economic circumstances. Prerequisite: GANTH 195 or permission of the instructor.

ANTH 375. History of Theory in Sociocultural Anthropology.

3 credits (C,R,W). Offered fall and spring.

An examination of the major theoretical traditions in social and cultural anthropology. Important theoreticians and the historical contexts in which their work emerged are discussed. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major. Prerequisites: GANTH 195 and junior standing.

ANTH 380. Chinese Society and Culture.

3 credits (C). Offered every three semesters.

An examination of modern China's social, cultural, and political structure from the 17th century to the present. Emphasis is placed on local level systems (town, village, lineage, family) and the roles they have played in China's transition from an agricultural to an industrial society.

ANTH 382. Cultures of Appalachia.

3 credits (C). Offered occasionally.

An overview of the peoples, cultures and special problems of the Appalachian region.

ANTH/SOCI 390. Topics in Cultural Studies.

3 credits (C).

This course explores contemporary culture through a "cultural studies" lens, an interdisciplinary perspective interested in using empirical knowledge to encourage more just human relations. Specific topics of investigation will vary by semester, but each course will cover cultural studies' intellectual history and its application to cultural expressions found in everday life, film, music and text.

ANTH 391. Study Abroad.

1 to 6 credit hours (C,F). Offered summer.

Designed to encourage students to enhance their academic programs through studying abroad. Arrangements must be made with a faculty member who will direct the study with preparatory instructions and final requirements. Prerequisites: Permission of Department Head.

ANTH 395. Special Topics in Anthropology.

3 credits (May be A,B or C). Offered occasionally.

Examination of selected topics which are of current importance to anthropology. May be taken for a maximum of six hours credit toward the major.

ANTH 420. Evolution of Human Behavior.

3 credits. Offered spring.

An exploration of human behavior from an evolutionary perspective. Darwinism, life history theory, and the fundamentals of heredity will be reviewed and employed in the analysis of human behavior, from bipedalism to morality. Data from the fossil and archeological records, genetics, non-human primate studies, and ethnographic fieldwork will be used. Prerequisite: ANTH 196 or permission of the instructor.

ANTH 435. Ethnographic Genres and Methods.

3 credits (C,F). Offered fall and spring.

Explores ethnographic methods and conventions of ethnographic writing through close reading, analysis, and production of ethnographic texts. Students develop critical skills in assessing ethnographic practice by examining how ethnographies are shaped by authors' fieldwork experiences, intellectual traditions, and theoretical perspectives. Students engage in fieldwork and craft their own ethnographic accounts. Prerequisite or corequisite: ANTH 375.

ANTH 455. Archaeology: Methods of Analysis and Interpretation.

3 credits (A,F). Offered spring.

A review of the nature of inquiry, recent theory and its practical implications and applications of acquiring, analyzing and interpreting archaeological data. In addition to training in methods of analysis used in contemporary practice, students will gain experience in archaeological report preparation. Prerequisites: GANTH 195 and ANTH 197.

ANTH 485. Anthropology Course Assistantship.

1-6 credits, only 3 of which can apply to the major (May be A, B or C). Offered fall and spring.

Students participate as course assistants in anthropology. Assistantships provide students with a sense of what it is like to teach an anthropology course by allowing them to work closely with faculty members through different phases of course preparation, presentation and evaluation. Assistantships also allow for a deeper understanding of course material by providing opportunities for student assistants to lead discussion and to help their peers review the material outside of the classroom. Prerequisite: Students must have junior/senior standing, must have earned a grade of "B" or better in the course for which s/he will serve as assistant, and may register by faculty invitation only.

ANTH 486. Internship in Anthropology.

1-6 credits (May be A, B or C). Offered fall and spring.

Designed to encourage students to enhance their academic programs by employing and refining anthropological skills through internships in public or private agencies. Arrangements must be made with a faculty member who will oversee the internship. Prerequisite: By permission only.

ANTH 490. Special Studies in Anthropology.

1-3 credits (May be A, B or C). Offered fall and spring.

Course offers students an opportunity to do independent study under staff supervision. Admission only by recommendation of the instructor and permission of the department head.

ANTH/ARTH/HIST 492. American Material Culture.

3 credits. (A) Offered every two semesters.

A broad introduction to the multidisciplinary "field" of material culture studies through readings, written assignments, in-class exercises, and field trips. The course introduces ways of looking at and learning from objects and examines how scholars from several disciplines have used material culture in their work. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

ANTH 494. Field Techniques in Archaeology.

4 - 8 credits (A,F). Offered summer.

Laboratory course directed at teaching students the basic field techniques and procedures of historic and prehistoric archaeology. Classroom lectures will present techniques and relevant aspects of method and theory.

ANTH/HIST 496. Research Thesis.

2 - 4 credits (A). Offered fall and spring.

Students will gather, analyze and interpret archaeological/historical data over two semesters. Students will work on a project that demonstrates theory, research design, data gathering and analysis, culminating in a written thesis. The course meets the capstone requirement for the historical archaeology minor, but is also available to students in history and anthropology. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.

ANTH 499 A,B,C. Honors. 6 credits.

Year course (May be A, B or C). Offered fall and spring.

An independent research topic initiated and completed by qualified senior majors who want to graduate with distinction.


Art

School of Art and Art History

ART 140. Two-Dimensional Design (0, 6).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Application and appreciation of the principles and elements of design, with emphasis on line, form, color and texture, as applied to two-dimensional space.

ART 160. Drawing I (0, 6).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An introductory course composed of problems in landscape, perspective, figure and still-life in several media.

GART 200. Art in General Culture.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An exploratory course which aims to develop a non-technical, general cultural understanding of the space arts, such as architecture, painting, sculpture and industrial design. Emphasis is on the contemporary.

ART 240. Three-Dimensional Design (0, 6).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A course exploring the basic problems in three-dimensional design.

ART 242. Color Theory (0, 6).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An exploration of the nature and theories of color. Students will study the expressive and symbolic qualities of master colorists and apply this knowledge to theoretical and practical problems. Prerequisite: ART 140.

ART 260. Drawing II (0, 6).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A continuation of ART 160 involving more complex problems with emphasis on composition and expressive possibilities of a variety of media including ink, pencil, conte, charcoal and experimental materials. Prerequisite: ART 160 or permission of the instructor.

ART 280. Foundations Seminar.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A required course for studio art majors focused on the exploration and exchange of ideas related to choosing a professional art career. Contemporary issues and responsibilities faced by emerging artists are emphasized. Students will write a descriptive analysis of the various visual art disciplines offered by JMU and construct an artist's statement. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major. Corequisites: ART 140, ART 240 and GARTH 206.

ART 310. Art Activities in the Elementary School. (1, 4).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A study of the aims and philosophy of art education in elementary school with an emphasis on child growth and development through art. Experience with art techniques and materials suitable from nursery school through grade eight with emphasis on appropriate motivational and teaching methods. Includes intensive field experiences for elementary grade levels.

ART 311. Secondary Art Education Methods.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

The study of art education methods, philosophy and contemporary practices as related to the middle and senior high school in public education. Includes class presentations, observation and practicum in the secondary grades. Prerequisites: PSYC 270 and EDUC 360.

ART 313. Introduction to Art Therapy (1, 4).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A survey dealing with the origins, historical development and major theoretical trends in the field of art therapy. Examines a variety of patient/client populations and treatment approaches. Visits to institutional settings will be included. Intended primarily for students in the arts, education and social sciences.

ART 317. Methods of Art Criticism.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

The practical analysis and interpretation of works of art through oral and written forms. Emphasis is on the practice of art criticism in public settings, such as the school classroom, art museum and college art studio.

ART 318. Visual Arts Across the Curriculum (1, 4).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Explores ways in which the art teacher can promote relationships between art and other subjects within the public school curriculum. Emphasis will be placed on how art experiences can be used to teach skills and concepts associated with other subjects. Includes a range of intensive field experiences at the middle grade level.

ART 321. Weaving and Other Fiber Arts (0, 9).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Introduction to and practice in basic weaving and other fiber arts. Emphasis will be placed on floor loom weaving and surface design on the fabric. Prerequisites: ART 140, ART 160.

ART 322. Metal and Jewelry (0, 9).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An exploration of techniques necessary to execute well-designed objects in metals including forming, repousse, stone setting, metal finishing, enameling and centrifugal casting. Prerequisites: ART 140, ART 160.

ART 323. Papermaking (0, 9).

1-3 credits, repeatable. Offered fall and spring.

A creative approach to handmade paper as an art medium. Emphasis will be on one-of-a-kind pieces. Cast paper, mould and deckle, mould formation, collage and assemblage techniques will be explored. Prerequisites: ART 140, ART 160.

ART 325. Ceramics (0, 6).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Exploration of ceramic hand-building processes and introduction to use of the potter's wheel. Prerequisites: ART 140, ART 160.

ART 326. Intermediate Ceramics (0, 9).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Studio practice in forming, firing and glazing ceramic ware. Wheel-thrown pottery will be emphasized. Fundamentals of glaze composition will be given in lectures. Prerequisite: ART 325.

ART 328. Stained Glass (0, 9).

1-3 credits, repeatable. Offered fall and spring.

A comprehensive course in the design and construction of stained glass panels or windows. Traditional glazing techniques of lead came and copper foil will be explored, as well as epoxy resin bonding of dalle de verre. Glass surface decorating techniques of sandblasting, etching, plating, fusing, glue chipping and painting will be demonstrated. Prerequisites: ART 140, ART 160.

ART 331. Intermediate Weaving and Other Fiber Arts (0, 9).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Introduction to surface design techniques such as painting and printing on fabric. Further work may be in this area (in which case no prerequisites apply) or in weaving or other fiber techniques. Prerequisite: ART 321 or permission of the instructor.

ART 333. Intermediate Metal and Jewelry (0, 9).

1-3 credits, repeatable. Offered fall and spring.

Continuation of development in metalworking and its skills with emphasis on design and craftsmanship. Prerequisite: ART 322 or equivalent.

ART 335. Sculpture (0, 9).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Problems in three-dimensional form using traditional and modern techniques. Processes of modeling in clay, mold making, casting, carving in wood and stone and welded metal sculpture are explored. Prerequisite: ART 240.

ART 336. Intermediate Sculpture (0, 9).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A study in casting techniques for sculpture using the lost wax process. Foundry operations, cold cast methods, ceramic shell and fiberglass are also explored. Prerequisite: ART 335.

ART 348. Animation: 3-D Modeling (0, 9).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An introduction to the techniques of 3-D Modeling in Computer Animation. Lectures, demonstrations and projects will involve the professional gaming and animation studios' methods of modeling digital characters and objects. Prerequisites: ART 140 and ART 160.

ART 349. Animation: 3-D Character Animation. (0, 9).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An introduction to the techniques of 3-D Animation. Lectures, demonstrations and projects will involve the professional gaming and animation studios' methods of animating digital characters, objects and dynamic forces. Prerequisites: ART 140 and ART 160.

ART 352. Printmaking: Screenprint (0, 9).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An introduction to the history and techniques of screenprinting. Lectures, demonstrations, and projects will involve photographic and nonphotographic stencils, related digital processes and color registration. Prerequisites: ART 140 and ART 160.

ART 353. Printmaking: Relief, Intaglio and Monotype (0, 9).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An introduction to the history and techniques of relief, intaglio and monotype printing. Lectures, demonstrations and projects will involve oil based and water soluble inks, linocut, woodcut, wood engraving, collagraph, drypoint, engraving, line etching, aquatint, softground, color registration, and related photographic processes. Prerequisites: ART 140 and ART 160.

ART 354. Printmaking: Lithography (0, 9).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An introduction to the history and techniques of lithography printing. Lectures, demonstrations and projects will involve stone and plate lithography, color registration and related photographic processes. Prerequisites: ART 140 and ART 160.

ART 355. Photography (0, 9).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A creative approach to photography with emphasis on understanding materials and techniques. (Students must provide a fully manual 35mm camera and a light meter which may be built into the camera or separate. Prerequisites: ART 140, ART 160.

ART 356. Intermediate Photography (0, 9).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Intensive exploration of advanced black and white photography and an introduction to view camera techniques. Prerequisite: ART 355.

ART 357. Digital Photography.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An intensive exploration of digital photography with an introduction to digital camera techniques, combinations of traditional and digital photographic methods, photo-editing and modes of output. Prerequisite: ART 355.

ART 360. Figure Drawing (0, 9).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An introductory course with problems stressing the fundamental skills, approaches and concepts involved in drawing the human figure. Prerequisites: ART 160 and ART 260.

ART 362. Painting (0, 9).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Introduction to basic materials and techniques in oil or acrylic painting. This class extends previous practice with design and drawing through introductory experiences in painting. Prerequisites: ART 140 and ART 160.

ART 366. Watercolor (0, 9).

3 credits. Offered once an academic year.

Study of and practice in transparent and opaque watercolor techniques. Prerequisites: ART 140, ART 160.

ART/PHIL 380. Seminar in Aesthetics.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Readings and discussions in the persistent philosophical problems of the arts, centering on consideration of the work of art, the artist and the audience. Prerequisite: GART 200, GARTH 205, GARTH 206 or GPHIL 101.

ART/ARTH/GRPH/INDE 389. Topics in Art, Art History, Graphic Design and Interior Design.

3 credits. Offering varies.

Study of selected topics in art, art history, graphic design or interior design at the intermediate level. May be repeated when course content changes. See e-campus for current topics. Prerequisite: GRPH 250 for Graphic Design topics.

ART/ARTH/GRPH/INDE 390. Independent Studies in Art, Art History, Graphic Design and Interior Design.

1-3 credits. Offering varies.

Independent activity at the intermediate level, such as research or studio practice, under faculty supervision. Projected students in any are of the school's offering must be arranged with the instructors who will direct them. Offered only with the consent of the director. Prerequisite: GRPH 250 for GRPH 290.

ART 421. Advanced Fiber Arts (0, 9).

1-3 credits, repeatable. Offered fall and spring.

A series of fiber projects selected by the student with the approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: ART 321 and ART 331.

ART 422. Advanced Metal and Jewelry (0, 9).

1-3 credits, repeatable. Offered fall and spring.

A series of metal arts projects selected by the student with the approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: ART 322 and ART 333.

ART 425. Advanced Ceramics (0, 9).

1-3 credits, repeatable. Offered fall and spring.

Advanced study in ceramic design with increased attention to the chemical composition of glazes and clays. Prerequisite: ART 326.

ART 435. Advanced Sculpture (0, 9).

1-3 credits, repeatable. Offered fall and spring.

Advanced study in sculpture focusing on projects chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor from an array of materials and processes used in contemporary sculpture. Prerequisite: ART 336.

ART 448. Advanced Animation (0, 9).

3 credits, repeatable. Offered fall and spring.

An advanced study of the complex aspects of natural human movement and expressions as they relate to the field of 3-D computer animation. This is a lecture/ studio class in which complex character modeling and animation will be explored. The goal is to create original models that move and express themselves similarly to those found in the movie industry. Prerequisites: ART 348 and ART 349.

ART 450. The Open Studio: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Creative Arts.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Introduction to the interdisciplinary studio through discussion of the history of interdisciplinary art and exposure to contemporary examples from dance, theatre, music, creative writing, visual art, film and video. Emphasis on production of original work that evidences the use of another media or collaborative work by artists from different disciplines. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor(s) and advanced skill level in one or more of the creative arts.

ART 454. Advanced Printmaking (0, 9).

1-3 credits, repeatable. Offered fall and spring.

Advanced projects in printmaking to be determined by the student and instructor. Prerequisite: ART 352, ART 353 or ART 354 as appropriate.

ART 455. Advanced Photography (0, 9).

1-3 credits, repeatable. Offered fall and spring.

Advanced study of photography focusing on Alternative and Color photo processes. Each semester the course will alternate between Alternative Process and Color Photography (check current class schedule) along with advanced projects in photography selected by the student and instructor. Prerequisite: ART 356.

ART 460. Advanced Figure Drawing.

1-3 credits, repeatable. Offered once an academic year.

An advanced drawing course stressing inventive and in-depth approaches to portraying the human figure. Prerequisite: ART 360.

ART 462. Advanced Painting (0, 9).

1-3 credits, repeatable. Offered fall and spring.

Advanced problems in media selected by the student with the advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: ART 362.

ART 466. Advanced Watercolor (0, 9).

1-3 credits, repeatable. Offered once an academic year.

Advanced problems in the use of watercolor and related water-based media. Prerequisite: ART 366.

ART/ARTH/GRPH/INDE 489. Topics in Art, Art History, Graphic Design and Interior Design.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Study of selected topics in art, art history, graphic design or interior design at the advanced level. May be repeated when course content changes. See e-campus for current topics.

ART/ARTH/GRPH/INDE 490. Independent Studies in Art, Art History, Graphic Design or Interior Design.

1-3 credits, repeatable. Offered fall and spring.

Independent activity, such as research or studio practice, under faculty supervision. Projected studies in any area of the school's offering must be arranged with the instructors who will direct them. Offered only with consent of the director. Prerequisite: GRPH 250 for GRPH 490.

ART/ARTH/GRPH 495. Internship in Art, Art History or Graphic Design.

1-8 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An off-campus program prepared and monitored on an individual basis. Internships are designed to provide practical experience in the arts. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and director. ARTH 494 for ART/ARTH 495 in museums and galleries. GRPH 250 for GRPH 495.

ART/ARTH/GRPH 499. Honors.

6 credits total for three semesters (1,3,2). Offered fall and spring.


Art History

School of Art and Art History

GARTH 205. Survey of World Art I: Prehistoric to Renaissance.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An introduction to the art and architecture of the world from cave painting through European Pre-Renaissance art. Includes ancient through medieval art in Europe and the Near East, as well as Asian and African arts.

GARTH 206. Survey of World Art II: Renaissance to Modern.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Introduction to art and architecture of the world from the Renaissance through Modern ages. Includes European Renaissance, Baroque, Enlightenment, 19th and 20th centuries, as well as Asian and African arts.

ARTH 210. African Art and Culture in the Humanities.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An interdisciplinary introduction to African art and culture with topics focusing on life ways, music, religion, philosophy, art, literature and cinema. This course provides a strong background for upper division course work in the arts of African and the African diaspora, as well as for students pursuing degrees in history and anthropology. May be counted as GHUM 252.

ARTH 300. Art History Seminar.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Exploration of various methodological approaches in the history of art, including connoisseurship, iconography, formalism, psychological studies and interpretations of art and society. Students will examine contrasting interpretations of major works of art. Seminar format. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major. Prerequisite: GARTH 205, GARTH 206 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 303. History of Design.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course is an investigation into the domains of graphic and industrial design. The material will explore these disciplines through reading, lecture and an acquired visual literacy of the contextual, ideational and philosophic agendas.

ARTH 304. History of Photography.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A survey of photography as an art form from its discovery to the present day. Emphasis is on 20th-century developments and recent contemporary trends.

ARTH 305. History of Decorative Arts.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A history of the decorative arts in Europe and America from c. 1200 to c. 1930. This course provides a stylistic and contextual analysis concentrating on domestic furnishings, including textiles, furniture, metals, ceramics and glass. Prerequisite: GARTH 205 or GARTH 206.

ARTH 313. Masterpieces of Italian Renaissance Art.

3 credits. (Semester in Florence only.) Offered fall and spring.

A survey of Italian Renaissance painting and sculpture (1280-1550), including the works of Giotto, Donatello, Masaccio, Fra Angelico, Botticelli, Leonardo and Michelangelo. Weekly visits to the Uffizi, San Marco, the Accademia and other Florentine museums.

ARTH 314. Masterpieces of Spanish Art.

3 credits. (Semester in Salamanca only.) Offered fall and spring.

A survey of art in Spain from prehistoric cave painting through 20th-century art. Emphasis is given to 17th/18th-century Baroque and modern artists including El Greco, Velasquez, Goya, Gaudi and Picasso. Visits to Altamira, the Alhambra, the Prado, Toledo, Santillana del Mar and other sites.

ARTH 315. Masterpieces of British Architecture.

3 credits. (Semester in London only.) Offered fall and spring.

This history and theory of British architecture from prehistoric to modern times. Weekly visits to the British Museum, Hampton Court, Avebury, Bath, Chiswick, the Victoria Albert Museum and other monuments.

ARTH 316. Masterpieces of British Art.

3 credits. (Semester in London only.) Offered fall and spring.

Survey of painting and sculpture in Britain (1530-1860) concentrating on 18th/19th-century painting. British art is viewed in the context of European civilization. Weekly visits to London museums including the Portrait Gallery, Sir John Soane's House, the Wallace Collection and the Tate Gallery.

ARTH 317. Masterpieces of French Art.

3 credits. (Semester in Paris only.) Offered fall and spring.

A survey of French art from the Middle Ages to the modern day. Weekly visits to the major museums of Paris including the Louvre, the Musee D'Orsay, Cluny and Centre Pompidou.

ARTH 320. Travel Study in Art History.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Art history credit is available to students participating in formal travel study programs with an emphasis on art history. Students maintain a journal with an emphasis on their art history experiences and write a research paper. Prerequisites: Permission of the program leader and art history coordinator. Formerly ARTH 419.

ARTH/ART/GRPH/INDE 389. Topics in Art, Art History, Graphic Design and Interior Design.

3 credits. Offering varies.

Study of selected topics in art, art history, graphic design or interior design at the intermediate level. May be repeated when course content changes. See e-campus for current topics. Prerequisite: GRPH 250 for Graphic Design topics.

ARTH/ART/GRPH/INDE 390. Independent Studies in Art, Art History, Graphic Design and Interior Design.

1-3 credits. Offering varies.

Independent activity at the intermediate level, such as research or studio practice, under faculty supervision. Projected students in any area of the school's offering must be arranged with the instructors who will direct them. Offered only with the consent of the director. Prerequisite: GRPH 250 for GRPH 290.

ARTH/HIST 396. Introduction to Public History.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An introduction to the varied and interdisciplinary "field" of Public History, such as community/local history, historic preservation, archives, historical archaeology, museum studies, business and policy history, documentary editing and publishing, and documentary films, through readings, class discussions, occasional guest speakers, and occasional field trips.

ARTH 410. African Art: The Sahara and Northern Sahel.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An introduction to the arts and cultures of northern and northwestern Africa. The diverse, rich heritage of Africa's arts will be explored through the major style areas of Saharan and northern sub-Saharan Africa including prehistoric rock arts, Egypt, northern Africa, Christian northeastern Africa and Islamic North Africa. Formerly ARTH 301.

ARTH 412. African Art: Sub-Saharan.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A survey of the arts and cultures of sub-Saharan Africa, focusing on the major style areas of the continent. Coverage will include: the historic sites of Nigeria, the Guinea Coast, and central, eastern, and southern Africa. Prerequisite: GARTH 205, GARTH 206 or permission of instructor.

ARTH 416. Arts of Oceania.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An introduction to the visual arts and cultures of Oceania (the South Pacific). The major style areas of Polynesia, Melanesia and Micronesia will be explored. Prerequisite: GARTH 205, GARTH 206 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 419. Topics in African Art.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Topics in African Art will deal with the current thematic or methodological issues such as contemporary African arts and artists, arts of the African diaspora, a particular media (such as architecture or the textile arts), portraiture and identity, the royal arts of Africa, African film and performance, or gender in the arts of Africa. Prerequisite: GARTH 205, GARTH 206, ARTH 210 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 420. Ancient Art.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A study of major works selected from the Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Greek, Etruscan and Roman cultures. Considers themes such as the development of sacred places, royal art and architecture and artistic conventions in early civilizations. Prerequisite: GARTH 205 or permission of the instructor. Formerly ARTH 402.

ARTH 424. Arts of Ancient Egypt.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A study of the arts and culture of Ancient Egypt (c. 3000 B.C. to c. 300 B.C.). This course will focus on the art and architecture of the Old and New Kingdoms and also examine the enduring fascination with this unique artistic heritage from the excavations of Napoleon to the present. Prerequisite: GARTH 205 or GARTH 206.

ARTH 430. Far Eastern Art.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A survey of East Asian art from prehistoric times to 19th-century colonialism. Emphasis is on the areas of major production: India, China and Japan, with less attention to such centers as Cambodia, Siam and Korea. Prerequisite: GARTH 205 or GARTH 206. Formerly ARTH 403.

ARTH 440. Early Medieval Art.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Survey of Early Christian, Hiberno-Saxon and Byzantine art 300-1200. Examines painting, mosaics, manuscripts illumination and the development of church design in Italy and the Byzantine World. Considers cross-fertilization of Pagan, Christian, Islamic and Barbarian arts in Western Europe in the Early Middle Ages. Prerequisite: GARTH 205 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 442. Art of Later Middle Ages.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A study of Western European arts and architecture in the later Middle Ages with concentration on Romanesque and Gothic styles (1000-1400). Examines church construction and allied arts around the millennium and the development of Gothic architecture, sculpture and painting in France, Italy and England. Prerequisite: GARTH 205 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 444. Gothic and Gothic Revival Architecture

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Survey of Gothic architecture in France, England and Italy 1150-1500 and its influence in England and America 1750-1910. Examines the design of major cathedrals and regional European Gothic styles. Explores their influence upon Walpole, Pugin, Ruskin and other champions of Gothic Revival. Prerequisite: GARTH 205, GARTH 206, or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 446. Italian Renaissance Art.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A survey of the development of Italian Renaissance art and architecture 1300-1550. Focuses on themes such as the revival of classical art, the influence of humanism and Neo-Platonism, the invention of perspective and the formation of the Early and High Renaissance styles. Prerequisite: GARTH 206 or permission of the instructor. Formerly ARTH 404.

ARTH 448. Studies in Leonardo and Michelangelo.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Seminar which examines the artworks of Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo Buonarroti. Discusses issues such as the artist's creative process, the development of the artist's style, the patron's role in artwork and inter-relationships between the artist's visual and literary works. Prerequisite: GARTH 206 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 449. Topics in Renaissance Art.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Topics in Renaissance art may include studies of major Italian or Northern Renaissance artists, the development of linear perspective, the Renaissance tomb chapel or art and politics of the Protestant Reformation. Prerequisite: GARTH 206 or permission of the instructor. Formerly ARTH 484.

ARTH 450. Baroque Art.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A survey of European art and architecture of the 17th century. This course will focus on Baroque art and its cultural context in Italy, France, Britain and Holland. Prerequisite: GARTH 206 or permission of the instructor. Formerly ARTH 406.

ARTH 452. Eighteenth Century Art.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A survey of the major European artistic movements of the 18th century. This course will focus on the development of the Rococo and Neo- classical styles in architecture, sculpture and painting. Prerequisite: GARTH 206 or permission of the instructor. Formerly ARTH 407.

ARTH 459. Topics in Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Art.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Topics in Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Art may include studies of particular artists such as Rembrandt, Caravagggio, or Watteau, studies of particular styles such as the Rococo, or thematic studies such as the history of garden design or the development of art theory. Prerequisite: GARTH 206 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 460. Nineteenth Century Art.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A study of European art (1750-1900) concentrating on Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism and Symbolism. Major topics include nationalism, historicism and the advent of new modes of representation. Prerequisite: GARTH 206 or permission of the instructor. Formerly ARTH 408.

ARTH 469. Topics in Nineteenth Century Art.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Topics in Nineteenth Century Art may include studies of major artists, such as Caspar David Friedrich or Edouard Manet, specific artists groups like the Pre-Raphaelite brotherhood, or thematic issues such as the relationship between art and nationalism. Prerequisite: GARTH 206.

ARTH 470. Modern Art from 1900-1945.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Principle trends in European and American art - painting, sculpture, photography, film, architecture - during the first decades of the century. Central themes include art and nationalism, modernity and industry/technology, impact of popular culture, and art theory and criticism. Prerequisite: GARTH 206 or permission of the instructor. Formerly ARTH 410.

ARTH 472. Modern Art Since 1945.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A study of the many developments and trends in American and European art since 1945. This course will focus on such movements as abstract expressionism, pop, conceptual art, installation art, video, film and computer art with an understanding of the theoretical basis of those movements and the development of the art market during this period. Prerequisite: GARTH 206 or permission of the instructor. Formerly ARTH 411.

ARTH 474. The New Media and Contemporary Art.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Advanced seminar that addresses impact of cultural politics and technology on how we make, evaluate and "speak" about art. Focus on a variety of media including video, multi-media installations, conceptual art, computer generated imagery, virtual "reality," contemporary film and digital photography. Prerequisite: ARTH 470, ARTH 472 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 476. Modern Architecture.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Survey of architecture from 1851 to the present day. Thematic investigations will include regional, philosophical and technical developments in architectural space. Architects may include Labrouste, Berlage, Wagner and Richardson, through Wright, Mies, Le Corbusier, to the avant-garde Murcutt, Siza, Nouvel and Mockbee. Prerequisite: GARTH 206 or permission of the instructor. Formerly ARTH 412.

ARTH 479. Topics in Twentieth Century Art.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Topics in Twentieth Century Art may include studies of contemporary painters (i.e. Gerhard Richter), sculptors (i.e. Kiki Smith), performance and video artists (i.e. Bill Viola) or thematic issues such as the relationships among art, technology and gender/racial politics. Prerequisite: ARTH 470, ARTH 472 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 480. American Art to 1870.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

American painting, sculpture, architecture and decorative arts from the Colonial period through 1870. Topics will include Colonial portraiture, African American aesthetics, the definition of folk art, nationalism and landscape painting and the question of American exceptionalism. The course will also introduce students to problems of interpretation in current scholarship. Prerequisite: GARTH 206.

ARTH 482. American Art from 1870.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

American painting, sculpture, architecture and decorative arts from 1870 to 1945. The course will address topics such as the American Renaissance, the Harlem Renaissance, Chicago School architecture, masculinity in Western American art, notions of decay in turn-of-the-century art and American modernism. It will also introduce methodological debates in current scholarship. Prerequisite: GARTH 206.

ARTH 484. Art of the Americas.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Art of indigenous peoples in the Americas (Meso, Central, South and/or North) before European contact. The course will examine domestic and state architecture, painting, textiles, ceramics, metalwork and earthworks within the context of geographic, state, religious and social issues. Other topics include museum display, repatriation and western taxonomies.

ARTH 486. Monticello.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A seminar on the architecture and material culture of Thomas Jefferson's Monticello. The course will examine the house's design, artwork, decorative arts, mechanical devices, landscape/garden design and Mulberry Row. Topics will include African American artisans at the Monticello joinery, Jefferson's Indian Hall, and European and African American domestic life in the Federal Period. Required field trips. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

ARTH/ART/GRPH/INDE 489. Topics in Art, Art History, Graphic Design and Interior Design.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Study of selected topics in art, art history, graphic design or interior design at the advanced level. May be repeated when course content changes. See e-campus for current topics.

ARTH/ART/GRPH/INDE 490. Independent Studies in Art, Art History, Graphic Design or Interior Design.

1-3 credits, repeatable. Offered fall and spring.

Independent activity, such as research or studio practice, under faculty supervision. Projected studies in any area of the school's offering must be arranged with the instructors who will direct them. Offered only with consent of the director. Prerequisite: GRPH 250 for GRPH 490.

ARTH/ANTH/HIST 492. American Material Culture.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A broad introduction to the multidisciplinary "field" of material culture studies through readings, written assignments, in-class exercises, and field trips. The course introduces ways of looking at and learning from objects and examines how scholars from several disciplines have used material culture in their work. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non history majors.

ARTH/HIST 493. Historic Preservation.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An introduction to the philosophy and techniques of historic preservation, guidelines for restoration, state and National Register forms and procedures, historic architecture, structural analysis, restoration techniques as well as the business aspects of historic preservation projects. Field trips are a major component of the course. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non history majors.

ARTH/HIST 494. Introduction to Museum Work.

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A study of the philosophy and practice of museum work including the areas of exhibit design, conservation registration, education and administration. Subject is taught from the perspective of the museum profession and is applicable to diverse disciplines and types of collections.

ARTH/ART/GRPH 495. Internship in Art or Art History or Graphic Design.

1-8 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An off-campus program prepared and monitored on an individual basis. Internships are designed to provide practical experience in the arts. ARTH 494 is a prerequisite for internships in museum and galleries. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and director. ARTH 494 for ART/ARTH 495 in museums and galleries. GRPH 250 for GRPH 495.

ARTH/ART/GRPH 499. Honors.

6 credits total for three semesters (1, 3, 2). Offered fall and spring.


Athletic Training Education Program

Department of Health Sciences

ATEP 205. Introduction to Athletic Training (2,2).

3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course provides a broad introduction to the profession of athletic training. Lectures will focus on the domains of athletic training. Emphasis will be placed on basic emergency management as well as injury prevention including environmental issues, strength and conditioning, and selection of equipment. Laboratory will mirror lecture.

ATEP 206. Recognition and Management of Athletic Injuries.

3 credits. Offered spring and summer.

Building on the concepts learned in ATEP 205, the course will emphasize the recognition of common athletic injuries. Pathology, mechanisms of injury, signs and symptoms, evaluation findings and basic management of injuries will be explored. Athletic injuries of special populations will also be addressed. Prerequisites: BIO 290 and ATEP 205.

ATEP 291. Pre-Professional Practicum in Athletic Training.

1 credit. Offered spring.

This course is designed to help students better understand the duties and responsibilities of the athletic trainer. By focusing on psychomotor skills and the application of didactic knowledge, students build a foundation which prepares them for future clinical rotations. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

ATEP 304A. Upper Quarter Evaluation (2, 2).

3 credits. Offered fall.

This course systematically focuses on orthopedic and neurological evaluation including functional testing of athletic injuries. The upper quarter consists of the upper extremity, head, neck and thorax. Other topics include management of crisis situations and facial injuries related to athletic participation. Prerequisite: ATEP 206.

ATEP 304B. Lower Quarter Evaluation (2, 2).

3 credits. Offered spring.

This course systematically focuses on orthopedic and neurological evaluation including functional testing of athletic injuries. The lower quarter consists of the lower extremity, pelvis and lumbar spine. Other topics include management of internal injuries and sudden death related to athletic participation. Prerequisite: ATEP 304A.

ATEP 305. Rehabilitation in Athletic Training: Upper Extremity.

3 credits. Offered spring.

This course explains the rehabilitation process of upper-extremity muscular and joint injuries related to athletic activities. Additional topics include prevention of athletic injuries and aquatic rehabilitation. Prerequisite: BIO 290.

ATEP 306. Therapeutic Modalities (3, 2).

4 credits. Offered fall.

This course provides a thorough overview of tissue injury, inflammatory response, healing process and neurophysiology applied to musculoskeletal injuries. Theory, application and clinical decision making processes using therapeutic modalities during rehabilitation will be emphasized. Documentation, purchasing and maintenance are also addressed. Prerequisites: BIO 270 and ATEP 206, permission of instructor.

ATEP 307. Field Applications in Athletic Training.

2 credits. Offered fall.

This course is designed for athletic training students to meet the educational competencies for national accreditation in the following areas: development of risk management/emergency action plans, prevention of injuries associated with the physically active, utilization of diagnostic tools and an overall understanding of protective equipment. Prerequisite: Admission to clinical component of Athletic Training Curriculum.

ATEP 350. Measurements and Testing in Athletic Training.

2 credits. Offered fall.

The purpose of this course is to introduce and develop proficiency with measurement techniques frequently used in athletic training. Students will learn clinical evaluation techniques such as manual muscle testing, goniometry, volumetric measurements and girth measurements. How these measures are used in research will also be presented. Prerequisite: Admission to clinical component of Athletic Training Curriculum.

ATEP 355. Infectious Disease Control.

1 credit. Offered spring.

Discussion includes theories of origins, statistics and characteristics of the causative pathogen, incubation, illness patterns, transmission, prevention and treatment of infectious and noninfectious disease. Emphasis is placed on STDs, HIV, Hepatitis and OSHA regulations. Prerequisite: Admission to clinical component of Athletic Training Curriculum.

ATEP 376. Pharmacology for Athletic Trainers.

2 credits. Offered fall.

This course is designed for students to understand knowledge, skills and values that an entry-level certified athletic trainer must possess in pharmacological applications, including awareness of the indications, contraindications, precautions and interactions of medications, and of the governing regulations relevant to physically active individuals. Prerequisite: Admission to clinical component of Athletic Training Curriculum.

ATEP 377. General Medicine in Athletic Training.

2 credits. Offered spring.

This course is designed for students to understand knowledge, skills and values that an entry-level certified athletic trainer must possess in order to recognize, treat and refer, when dealing with general medical conditions and disabilities related to athletes or others involved in physical activity. Prerequisite: Admission to clinical component of Athletic Training Curriculum.

ATEP 392. Level II Practicum in Athletic Training.

2 credits. Offered fall.

This course focuses on clinical performance and application of didactic knowledge. Clinical rotations, clinical competencies, inservices, case studies and professional journal are included in course content. Sport specific activities and clinical applications involving palpation and wound care are key components of this course. Prerequisite: Admission to clinical component of Athletic Training Curriculum.

ATEP 393. Level III Practicum in Athletic Training.

2 credits. Offered spring.

This course focuses on clinical performance and application of didactic knowledge. Clinical rotations, clinical competencies, inservices, case studies and professional journal are included in course content. Sport specific activities and clinical applications involving manual muscle testing and equipment fitting are key components of this course. Prerequisite: ATEP 392.

ATEP 405. Rehabilitation in Athletic Training: Lower Extremity (2, 2).

3 credits. Offered fall.

This course explains the rehabilitation process of lower extremity muscular and joint injuries related to athletic activities. Additional topics include rehabilitation facility design, budget preparation and pre-season assessment. Prerequisite: ATEP 305.

ATEP 406. Organization and Administration in Athletic Training.

3 credits. Offered spring.

This course is an overview of managerial issues including legal concerns, OSHA guidelines, budgeting/purchasing and staffing. In addition, this course provides a variety of experiences culminating in the knowledge and skills needed to meet entry-level competencies set by the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

ATEP 494. Level IV Practicum in Athletic Training.

2 credits. Offered fall.

This course focuses on clinical performance and application of didactic knowledge. Clinical rotations, clinical competencies, inservices, case studies, and professional journal are included in course content. Sport specific activities and clinical applications involving orthopedic testing and emergency internal abdominal/chest evaluation are key components. Prerequisite: ATEP 393.

ATEP 495. Level V Practicum in Athletic Training.

2 credits. Offered spring.

This course focuses on clinical performance and application of didactic knowledge. Clinical rotations, clinical competencies, inservices, case studies and professional journal are included in course content. Sport specific activities and clinical applications involving cranial nerve assessment and neurological evaluation are key components of this course. Prerequisite: ATEP 494.