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Communication Studies

School of Communication Studies

SCOM 121. Basic Human Communication. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of the basic processes of oral human communication. Emphasis on oral skills in message composition, analysis of subject matter, listening, definition of communication purposes and participation skills in a variety of oral communication contexts. The class will focus on dyadic, small group and public communication events.

 

SCOM 122. Public Speaking. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of creative and practical skills of public speaking. Emphasis on practice and analysis based on measurable objectives and speech purposes. Consideration given to how to design and deliver effective speeches of various types for various occasions and purposes.

 

SCOM 220. Introduction to Interpersonal Communication. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Introduction to the fundamental theoretical perspectives in interpersonal communication. Emphasis on the effects of verbal and nonverbal messages on continuity and change in personal relationships. Consideration of the influence of cultural and social contexts on messages in relationships. Development of communication competence in diverse interpersonal contexts.

 

SCOM 231. Introduction to Alternative Dispute Resolution. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of conflict resolution processes including mediation, arbitration and negotiation. Consideration of litigation and hybrid dispute processes such as summary jury trial, rent-a-judge and panel evaluation.

 

SCOM 240. The Process of Human Communication. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of communication studies as a behavioral process employing verbal and nonverbal modes of interaction. Emphasis on learning theory, motivation, language, meaning and social interaction as applied to the theory of communication studies. Consideration of role of communication in all human endeavors.

 

SCOM 242. Presentational Speaking. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of methods for preparing and presenting public speeches. Consideration of impromptu and extemporaneous speaking, sales speeches, business presentations and other special occasion speeches. Emphasis on performance and evaluation. Prerequisite: Any 100-level communication studies course or permission of the instructor.

 

SCOM 243. Oral Interpretation. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study and application of theories concerning the oral presentation of various forms of literature including prose, poetry, drama and nonfiction materials. Emphasis on performance. Prerequisite: Any 100-level communication studies course or permission of the instructor.

 

SCOM 245. Signs, Symbols and Social Interaction. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The study of verbal and nonverbal communication as used in human interaction. Consideration given to the function of symbolic systems in self-concept development, the structuring of reality and social discourse. Attention is directed toward the use of signs and symbols by different ethnic groups, genders, age groups and geographic groups.

 

SCOM 247. Small Group Communication. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of communication processes involved in solving problems when working with others in a small group context. Emphasis on concepts of roles, norms, leadership and decision making. Consideration of small group factors which influence problem-solving effectiveness. Prerequisite: Any 100-level communication studies course or permission of the instructor.

 

SCOM 248. Intercultural Communication. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The study of human communication in a variety of cultural settings and contexts. Emphasis on developing understanding and analytical skills regarding communication between people from different racial, ethnic and cultural backgrounds in both domestic and international settings. Consideration of relevance and application to social, business and political environments.

 

SCOM 260. Introduction to Public Relations. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of basic principles and practices of public relations. Consideration given to public relations problems and pragmatic solutions utilizing oral, written and electronic communication media and skills.

 

SCOM 261. Public Relations Techniques I: Written. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of writing fundamentals for public relations. Emphasis on practice of effective writing for a variety of media (press releases, public service announcements, brochures, newsletters). Must be able to use word processing software. Prerequisite: SCOM 260 or permission of the instructor.

 

SCOM 270. Introduction to Health Communication. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An introduction to the study of the theory and practice of communication in health and medical-related fields. Emphasis on communication interaction between professional health providers and patients/clients. Consideration of strategies that promote effective communication between health/medical professionals and patients/clients. Prerequisite: Any 100-level communication studies course.

 

SCOM 280. Introduction to Communication Research. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An introduction to the principles, methods and analysis techniques used in the field of communication. Emphasis on a broad-based understanding of the breadth of research in the field. Includes both qualitative and quantitative research methods, methods of literature review and research article critiques. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major. Prerequisite: SCOM 240.

 

SCOM 313. Topics in Communication Studies. 1-3 credits. Repeatable to 6 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of current topics and issues in human communication. Emphasis on contemporary theories, research and principles. Prerequisites: Nine hours of communication studies courses including SCOM 240 and one at 100 level or permission of instructor.

 

SCOM 318. Practicum in Communication Studies. 1-6 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Approved cocurricular activities and/or projects of a practical nature. No more than six hours of practicum credit can be applied to major. Proposals must be submitted to and approved by the course instructor for section and credit hour registration. To receive repeat credit see school director. Prerequisite: Permission of the school director.

 

SCOM 331. Communication and Conflict. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An examination of communication in conflict situations. Emphasis on communication competencies required for successful management and resolution of conflict. Consideration of theories of conflict and application to different conflict levels including interpersonal communication, small group communication and organizational communication. Prerequisite: SCOM 231 recommended.

 

SCOM 332. Mediation. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of analysis and resolution of human conflict. Emphasis on role of mediation in dispute resolution focusing on relationships, language, listening and problem-solving techniques. Consideration of the interpersonal and group approaches to study of conflict management. Prerequisite: SCOM 231 recommended.

 

SCOM 341. Persuasion. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The study of oral communication as a determinant of attitudinal and behavioral change. Emphasis on the various kinds of artistic and non-artistic proofs as they apply to human motivation. Consideration of the application of behavioral research findings to persuasion. Prerequisites: SCOM 240 and SCOM 280 or permission of the instructor.

 

SCOM 342. Argument and Advocacy. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The study of the techniques and principles of argument and advocacy. Emphasis on developing, presenting and defending a position on controversial questions. Consideration given to contemporary theories of public argument.

 

SCOM 345. Nonverbal Communication. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of nonverbal means through which people relate to one another. Consideration of the communicative effects of environment, facial expression, voice, posture, gestures, touch, distance and physical appearance. Prerequisites: SCOM 245 recommended and any 200-level communication studies course or permission of the instructor.

 

SCOM 346. Free Speech in America. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The study of the evolution of freedom of speech in America from Colonial times to the present day. Emphasis on the major periods of development and on the role of courts in defining freedom of speech. Special consideration of contemporary freedom of speech controversies.

 

SCOM 347. Communication, Diversity and Popular Culture. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of the rhetorical dimension of communication practices and texts found in popular culture. Emphasis on issues of diversity as they are manifested in the communication practices found in popular culture. Emphasis on strategic communication choices in a diverse, multicultural world. Emphasis on critical thinking, self-reflexivity and communication analysis. Prerequisite: GCOM 121.

 

SCOM 348. Communication and Gender. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of theories and research regarding the influence of gender in various human communication contexts, both public and private. Emphasis on the critical analysis of existing theory and empirical research and the potential competent uses of communication for social change. Prerequisite: Any 100-level communication studies course or permission of the instructor.

 

SCOM 350. Organizational Communication. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of theories and principles of communication within organizations. Emphasis on analysis of formal and informal communication systems, networks and interactions with organizational hierarchies. Consideration of both profit and not-for-profit contexts.

 

SCOM 352. Communication and Social Movements. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
A study of the use of communication in social movements. Emphasis on the types of communication used in social movements and on ways to produce and respond to such messages. This course examines a variety of different social movements within the political process including nonprofit organizations. Prerequisite: SCOM 240.

 

SCOM 353. American Political Culture and Communication. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of functions performed by communication in politics. Emphasis on a variety of communication forms and techniques used by advocates both in campaigning and governing. Consideration of contemporary campaigns and the role of communication in their successes and failures. Prerequisites: SCOM 240 and GPOSC 225 are recommended or permission of the instructor.

 

SCOM 358. Business and Professional Communication Studies. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of techniques of effective communication in business/professional context. Emphasis on communication skills and results. Consideration of communication problems unique to the business/professional environment.

 

SCOM 361. Public Relations Techniques II: Visual. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of visual communication techniques for public relations. Survey of design principles and elements used for developing visually effective messages with an emphasis on publication design and production, photography and computer-mediated presentations. Students should provide a camera and be familiar with desktop publishing and presentational software. Prerequisite: SCOM 261 or permission of the instructor.

 

SCOM 381. Communication Criticism. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of methods of evaluating acts of persuasive communication. Emphasis on developing and applying appropriate standards to determine effectiveness of persuasion. Consideration of criticism of advertising, mass media, public speaking and other forms of persuasive communication. Prerequisites: SCOM 280 and any 100-level communication studies course or permission of the instructor.

 

SCOM 383. Communication Research Methodologies. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The study of research methods in various areas of communication. Emphasis on ability to research literature and criticize research design. Prerequisites: SCOM 280 and nine hours of communication studies courses or permission of the instructor.

 

SCOM 386. Communication Survey Research. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Consideration of survey problems and methods unique to communication. Emphasis on using survey research methodology in communication audits, public relations problems and public opinion polling. Prerequisite: SCOM 280 or permission of the instructor.

 

SCOM 390. Directed Projects. 2-3 credits, repeatable to 6 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Supervised projects related to any aspect of human communication. Emphasis on original individual or group programs beyond the department's usual curricular or cocurricular offerings. Formal report(s) required for awarding of credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the school director.

 

SCOM 391. Communication Career Strategies. 1 credit. Offered fall and spring.
The study of strategies for implementing a job/internship campaign. Emphasis on conducting a self assessment, locating job and internship openings, writing resumes, cover letters and follow-up messages, conducting informational interviews, networking, interviewing techniques and marketing a communication studies degree. Prerequisite: 12 credit hours in communication studies.

 

SCOM 394. Core Assessment in Communication Studies. 0 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Students participate in testing, interviews and other assessment activities as approved by the School of Communication Studies. Grades will be assigned on a credit/no credit basis. Prerequisites: SCOM 240, SCOM 242, SCOM 245, SCOM 280 and SCOM 341.

 

SCOM 431. Legal Communication. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of the role of communication in the legal process. Emphasis on communication questions/problems which litigants, lawyers, judges and jurors face. Consideration of legal argument, negotiation, trial advocacy, decision making and communication technologies.

 

SCOM 432. Senior Seminar in Conflict and Mediation Studies. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An advanced seminar, capstone course for students concentrating or minoring in conflict and mediation studies. Special topics are developed to include research in conflict resolution, current trends in dispute resolution, evolving practices in conflict and mediation, as well as other relevant and timely issues.

 

SCOM 440. Advanced Interpersonal Communication. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
A study of the major conceptual approaches and research methods used in the study of interpersonal communication. Emphasis on communication and relationship development, maintenance and disengagement. This course involves advanced analysis and critical evaluation of research in interpersonal communication. Prerequisites: SCOM 220 and SCOM 280 plus six additional hours of communication studies courses, or permission of the instructor.

 

SCOM 449. Communication Training. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An examination of methods for planning, arranging and conducting communication training. Students become familiar with strategies and activities designed to help others improve their communication skills. Prerequisites: Junior standing and 12 hours in communication studies or permission of the instructor.

 

SCOM 450. Advanced Studies in Organizational Communication. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Integrated study of organizational communication theory and research. Analysis of communication systems within organizations and at their boundaries. Special attention to field studies. Prerequisite: SCOM 350 or permission of the instructor.

 

SCOM 453. Political Campaign Communication. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An advanced study of communication techniques, procedures and processes as they relate to political campaign communication. Emphasis upon the design, execution and production of various communication messages. Consideration of the impact and utilization of various technologies in political campaigns. Prerequisite: SCOM 353 or permission of the instructor.

 

SCOM 460. Public Relations Management. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Intensive study and research of advanced communication management skills, theory and principles using case and field studies. Special attention to systematic and ethical management of communication and action affecting an organization's internal and external publics. Prerequisites: SCOM 341,SCOM 361 and SCOM 386.

 

SCOM 461. Public Relations Campaigns. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The capstone course for the public relations program of study. Students further their theoretical understanding and practical skills in the processes of research, planning, communication/action and evaluation by conducting campaigns for specific organizations. Prerequisites: SCOM 261, SCOM 361, SCOM 386 and SCOM 460 or permission of the instructor.

 

SCOM 470. Health Communication Campaigns. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The study of advanced theory and practice of communication in health-related fields. Consideration of topics relating to communication issues which affect communication interaction between health professionals and clients/patients. Emphasis on the use of communication in health communication campaigns. Prerequisite: SCOM 270 or permission of the instructor.

 

SCOM/SMAD/POSC 472. Media and Politics. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
A study of the media's role in political campaigns, concentrating on past/present election, the media's role in covering political parties and coverage of the governing process. Discussion of electronic and print will occur. Topics to be examined include campaign videos, CSPAN, political ads, editorial cartoons, TV debates, convention coverage and radio talk show commentary.

 

SCOM 490. Special Studies in Communication Studies. 1-3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An independent study for students to pursue individual research under the guidance of faculty. Limited to senior communication studies majors in good standing with permission of school director.

 

SCOM 495. Internship in Communication Studies. 3-6 credits, repeatable to 6 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Credit for the application of communication theory and skills in a directed, on-the-job learning experience. Open only to communication studies majors who meet specific criteria (see the school Web site). Up to six credits may be applied as electives in the communication studies' major. Prerequisite: Permission of the school director.

 

SCOM 499. Honors in Communication Studies. 6 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Year course. Prerequisite: Permission of the school director..

 

Media Arts and Design

School of Media Arts and Design

SMAD 101. Introduction to Media Arts and Design. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of the historical evolution of today's media industries and career paths. Emphasis on contemporary issues affecting those industries and careers. Consideration given to emerging media, their required skills and social impacts. Prerequisite: Formal declaration for admission to the SMAD major.

 

SMAD 201. Fundamental Skills in Media Arts and Design I. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of basic computer operating systems and the principles and practices of graphic production for digital and interactive media. Focus on tools and techniques used to create graphic content for diverse media delivery systems. Prerequisite: Admission to the SMAD major.

 

SMAD 202. Fundamentals Skills in Media Arts and Design II. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of the aesthetic principles and practices of audio and video production for digital media. Focus on the technological requirements of producing audio and video for different delivery systems such as television, interactive CD/DVD and the web. Prerequisite: Admission to the SMAD major.

 

SMAD 210. News Writing. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The study of the fundamentals of news writing, including news gathering techniques and modern news style. Emphasis on day-to-day coverage of meetings, events and breaking news stories. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major. Prerequisite: Admission to the SMAD major or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 220. News Editing. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The study of editorial functions in the modern newsroom. Consideration of problems in news judgment, news style and the laws of libel. Emphasis upon layout and headline writing. Prerequisite: Admission to the SMAD major or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 225. Photojournalism. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The study of visual information gathering for print media including photojournalism. Emphasis on photographic techniques and print media layout. Consideration of new visual technologies including the use of computers for electronic photo editing and design. Students must provide their own camera. Prerequisite: Admission to the SMAD major and SMAD 201 or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 231. Multimedia Writing. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of the principles and practices of writing for multimedia applications. Emphasis on the nature of interactivity and the relationship between text and image, sound and video. Attention to the development of multimedia presentations designed to inform, persuade and entertain. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major. Prerequisite: Admission to the SMAD major or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 241. Corporate Media Writing. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study and practice of the forms and techniques used in corporate media writing. Emphasis on writing and editing skills necessary for print, broadcast and Web-based media. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major. Prerequisite: Admission to the SMAD major or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 250. Scriptwriting. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The study of the principles and practices of writing scripts for commercial, non-commercial and corporate media applications. Emphasis on preparing dramatic and informational forms for broadcast or recording. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major. Prerequisite: Admission to the SMAD major or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 251. Screenwriting. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Introductory study of the principles and practices of screenwriting. Emphasis is placed on the basic narrative structures underlying cinematic story-telling and the development of a short film script. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major. Prerequisite: Admission to the SMAD major or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 256. Principles of Advertising. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of the principles and practices of advertising, including the process, planning, production and placement of commercial messages. Students will learn of the social impact, creative strategy, consumer use, message production and media placement strategies of advertising. Students get practical experience applying an integrated communication strategy. Prerequisite: SMAD 201 and SMAD 202 or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 295. Practicum in Media Arts and Design. 1 credit, repeatable to 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Freshmen and sophomores participating in cocurricular media activities may receive one hour of credit for field work at The Breeze, WMRA-FM, the Madison Video Productions or other university-related media outlets. Students are limited to one practicum per semester. Application procedures will be available from the school prior to registration. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 301. The Media Arts: Culture by Design. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of how mediated communication molds perception and influences cultural change. Emphasis on how language and imagery, sound and music are combined in current media to create meaning. Consideration of emerging media and their implications for cultural design. Prerequisites: SMAD 201 and 202, or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 302. Videography. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Principles and practices of video field production. Focus on visual composition, lighting and sound, production, planning, and operation of portable video recording equipment. Emphasis on shooting and editing for broadcast, non-broadcast and multimedia applications. Prerequisites: SMAD 201 and 202, or permission of the instructor. Corequisite SMAD 303.

 

SMAD 303. Digital Post-Production. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Principles and practices of digital video post-production. Focus on aesthetic considerations, technologies and strategies used to edit video and audio for a variety of program forms and contexts. Prerequisites: SMAD 201 and 202, or permission of the instructor. Corequisite SMAD 302.

 

SMAD 304. Advanced Digital Audio Production. 3 credits. Offered periodically.
Study of digital sound production, digital music production and digital sound-for-picture production. Emphasis on advanced theories and applications. Prerequisites: SMAD 201 and 202, or permission of the instructor. Formerly SMAD 334.

 

SMAD 305. Topics in Media Arts and Design. 3 credits, repeatable to 6 credits. Offered periodically.
The study of current topics and issues in media arts and design. Emphasis on contemporary themes of immediate concern. Prerequisite: Admission to the SMAD major or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 307. Multimedia for the Web. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of the principles of creating effective communication for the World Wide Web. Emphasis on the techniques used to design and integrate diverse media elements. Focus on the creation and manipulation of text, graphics, audio and video for the Web. Consideration of interface design and Web delivery issues. Prerequisites: SMAD 201 and 202, or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 308. Interactive Multimedia Authoring. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of the principles and practices for creating effective interactive multimedia and animation. Emphasis on the tools and techniques used to design and integrate diverse media elements. Focus on interactive multimedia authoring, effective user interface design and computer animation for CD-ROM/DVD-ROM delivery. Prerequisites: SMAD 307 or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 310. Advanced News Writing. 3 credits. Offered periodically.
Advanced study and practice of news writing and news gathering techniques. Emphasis on in-depth and investigative stories. Prerequisite: SMAD 210 or SMAD 241, or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 311. Feature Writing. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The study and practice of advanced techniques in planning and writing feature stories. Emphasis on individual performance through criticism of student work in conference with the instructor. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major. Prerequisite: SMAD 210 or SMAD 241, or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 322. Newspaper Production. 3 credits. Offered fall.
Advanced study in the knowledge and skills required to produce a newspaper. Areas of study include story generation, writing, editing, picture editing, page design, layout, on-screen pagination, production and management. Consideration given to the journalistic responsibilities and problems of serving a diverse audience. Prerequisite: SMAD 210, SMAD 220, SMAD 241 or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 321. Feature Magazine Production. 3 credits. Offered spring.
A practical course in which students produce a feature magazine published regularly by the journalism area. Each student is assigned a specific staff position. Students learn to use the latest computer pagination technology in the design and production of a magazine. Prerequisite: SMAD 311 or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 330. Multimedia Law. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An in-depth investigation of business and legal aspects of multimedia production, publication and distribution. Examination of legal issues affecting the multimedia industry including: intellectual property laws, torts, contracts and licensing. Discussion of current policies and practices affecting multimedia development and review of pertinent legal reference materials. Prerequisite: Admission to the SMAD major and junior standing, or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD/GRPH 339. Web Design. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Introduction to web design through theory and practical application. Assignments will focus on the unique form, content and structures associated with designing for the World Wide Web. Special emphasis on the creative process and the graphic presentation of ideas. Prerequisite: SMAD majors: SMAD 201 and SMAD 202; GRPH emphasis: GRPH 243 and GRPH 250 or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 340. Advanced Screenwriting. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Advanced study of the principles of screenplay writing for feature films and television movies. Emphasis is placed on the structure of the full-length narrative film. Prerequisite: SMAD 251; for non-majors: ENG 381; or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 341. Web Communication. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of the design and development of the World Wide Web as a corporate communications tool. Emphasis on project planning and research, Web site design and management. Focus on the lexicon of the web, the tools and techniques of ecommerce, and Web site promotion. Attention to research and Web communication management principles. Prerequisites: SMAD 201 and SMAD 202, or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 356. Telecommunication Policy and Regulation. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An overview of the regulatory issues encountered in the telecommunication industry. Emphasizes post 1982-FCC changes deregulating telephone, CATV, and broadcast industries. Includes regulation of emerging services and technologies, First Amendment issues, ownership and distribution of new information forms and limitations and uses of technology. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 370. Mass Communication Law. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Principles and case studies in communication law, constitutional guarantees, libel, privacy, contempt, copyright and governmental regulatory agencies. Emphasis on recent cases and their effects on mass communication. Prerequisites: Admission to the SMAD major and junior standing, or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 371. Narrative Media Theories. 3 credits. Offered spring.
Study of media theories that focus on the functions and effects of storytelling in cinema and television. Emphasis on how such theories explain the cultural impact and personal utility of narrative contents in everyday life. Consideration of critical methods and research techniques underpinning these diverse explanations of media influence. Corequisite: SMAD 301 or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 372. Media History. 3 credits. Offered periodically.
The study of the history of the media in relation to American politics and society. Emphasis on key periods in the development of journalism and the mass media and the role of the journalist in society. Prerequisites: Admission to the SMAD major and junior standing, or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 373. Media Analysis and Criticism. 3 credits. Offered fall or spring.
The study and practice of journalistic and scholarly criticism of the mass media. Emphasis on interpretive writing about television, film and popular music. Consideration of contemporary analytical methods for researching mass-mediated culture. Prerequisite: SMAD 301; for non-majors: admission to the Interdisciplinary Minor in Creative Writing; or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 390. Directed Projects in Media Arts and Design. 2 credits, repeatable to 4 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Supervised projects related to the study of any of the communication media. Credit given for original individual or group programs beyond the school's usual cocurricular activities. A suitable completed project or report is required before credit can be awarded. Prerequisite: Permission of the school director.

 

SMAD 395. Advanced Practicum in Media Arts and Design. 1 credit, repeatable to 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Juniors and seniors participating in cocurricular media activities may receive one hour of credit for field work at The Breeze, Curio, WMRA-FM, the Madison Video Productions or other university-related media outlets. Students are limited to one practicum per semester. Application procedures will be available from the school prior to registration. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 400. Senior Assessment in Media Arts and Design. 0 credits. Offered spring.
Students participate in testing, interviews, project reviews and other assessment activities as approved by the School of Media Arts and Design. Grades will be assigned on a credit/no-credit basis. Prerequisites: SMAD 301 or permission of the School Director.

 

SMAD 402. Advanced Post-Production. 3 credits. Offered spring.
Study and application of digital compositing with non-linear video editing systems. Focus on creating dynamic media elements for traditional and multimedia video applications. Emphasis on changing nature of video post production and the roles and responsibilities of video editors. Attention to client relations, and project and facilities management. Prerequisites: SMAD 302 and SMAD 303, or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 404. Advanced Multimedia. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course provides opportunities for students to increase their understanding of advanced multimedia topics and to further develop their interactive media production skills. Students will produce multimedia projects that incorporate various types of digital media and are suitable for publishing on the Web or CD-ROM/DVD-ROM. Prerequisites: SMAD 307 and SMAD 308, or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 405. Video Producing and Directing. 3 credits. Offered spring.
Study of the principles and practices of producing and directing programs for video and television. Emphasis on the creative development and production of programs designed to inform, entertain and persuade. Consideration of the impact of digital technology on program production and distribution. Attention to the collaborative nature of production management. Prerequisites: SMAD 302 and SMAD 303, or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 406. Electronic News Gathering & Producing. 3 credits. Offered fall.
Study of the processes and responsibilities of producing news for electronic distribution. Students will research, write and produce stories for distribution over-the-air, on cable and over the Internet. Emphasis on legal and ethical issues in news coverage. Prerequisites: SMAD 302 and 303, or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 407. Business and Management of Digital Media. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of the principles and practices of managing digital media production. Emphasis on financial and personnel management, client relationships, and the structures and practices of digital media industries. Consideration of new trends in production and distribution. Attention to career preparation and development. Prerequisites: Senior standing and SMAD 302 and SMAD 303 or SMAD 307 and SMAD 308 or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 432. Print Communication Design. 3 credits. Offered spring.
An introduction to the theories and methods of design for print communication. Students will learn various techniques needed to produce the design materials that go into print publications. Prerequisite: SMAD 201 or SMAD 225, or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 441. Corporate Communication Management. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of principles and practices of managing corporate communication. Emphasis on evaluation and management of messages, channels, and appropriate media. Attention given to critical analysis and strategic planning. Focus on legal, ethical, financial, personnel issues and career development will. Analysis of case studies and current issues. Prerequisites: Senior standing and SMAD 241, or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 460. Movies and Society. 3 credits. Offered fall.
The study of the cultural impact of the film industry as an institution of mass communication. Emphasis on the interrelationship among social, economic and technological factors influencing the creation and consumption of motion pictures. Consideration of particular films as indicators of cultural change. Prerequisites: SMAD 301; for non-majors: admission to the Interdisciplinary Minor in Film Studies; or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 461. Movies as Art. 3 credits. Offered spring.
Advanced study of how movies tell their stories in visual terms. Emphasis on the historical evolution and design of the moving image. Consideration of the latest imaging technologies affecting film narrative. Prerequisites: SMAD 301; for non-majors: ENG 380A; or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 462. Documentary in Film and Television. 3 credits. Offered spring.
The study of content, style, technique and effect of representative samples of the documentary form. Consideration given to informational and persuasive elements. Prerequisites: SMAD 301; for non-majors: ENG 380A; or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 463. Film Adaptations. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The study of the process of adapting literature into feature films. Consideration is given to the original literary work, as well as to the changes undergone in its adaptation to film. Prerequisite: SMAD 301; For non-majors: ENG 380A or admission to the Interdisciplinary Minor in Creative Writing; or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 471. Media Ethics. 3 credits. Offered fall.
The study of ethical principles and how they apply in a variety of media situations, including entertainment programming news and advertising. Emphasis on case studies as examples of ethical decision-making. Prerequisites: Admission to the SMAD major and junior standing, or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD/SCOM/POSC 472. Media and Politics. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
A study of the media's role in political campaigns, concentrating on past/present election, the media's role in covering political parties and coverage of the governing process. Discussion of electronic and print will occur. Topics to be examined include campaign videos, CSPAN, political ads, editorial cartoons, TV debates, convention coverage and radio talk show commentary.

 

SMAD 490. Special Studies in Media Arts and Design. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An independent study for students to pursue individual research under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Prerequisites: Senior media arts and design majors in good standing and permission of the school director.

 

SMAD 495. Internship in Media Arts and Design. 2 credits, repeatable to 4 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An off-campus program prepared and monitored on an individual student basis. Internships are designed to provide practical experience in journalism, electronic media, corporate media or visual communication. Prerequisites: Permission of the school director and the media facility involved. Students must meet criteria and application procedures established in each concentration.

 

SMAD 498. Senior Seminar in Media Arts and Design. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The study and research in the history and philosophy of the function of mass communication in society. Consideration of topics relating to problems of communication systems, technological freedoms and press freedom and responsibilities. Prerequisites: SMAD 301 and senior standing or permission of the instructor.

 

SMAD 499. Honors in Media Arts and Design. 6 credits. Offered fall and spring.

 

Sociology

Department of Sociology and Anthropology

SOCI 101. Introductory Sociology. 3 credits. Offered once an academic year.
Provides students with an understanding of the structure and processes of modern societies and their historical antecedents. Explores the universality of the social experience by addressing such topics as culture, socialization, social interaction, bureaucracy, norms and diversity, social inequality, social institutions, modernization, technology and social change, worldviews, values and behavior.

 

SOCI 102. Social Problems. 3 credits.
Introduces students to the study of problems of social value (e.g., environment, inequality, injustice, militarism, alienation) facing individuals and groups in complex societies. Examines problems inherent in social structure concerning the balance between individual freedom and social control.

 

SOCI 200. Development of Sociological Thought and Methods. 4 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course is a foundation course for sociology majors. Topics will include the historical development of the discipline with an emphasis on the social and philosophical forces that influenced the development of sociology. Main sociological traditions will be introduced including the critical, naturalistic and interpretive paradigms and sociological analysis from these perspectives. Prerequisites: SOCI 101, or GSOCI 210,or GSOCI 240, or permission of instructor.

 

SOCI 201. Sociology Proseminar. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An introduction to sociological resources, literature, writing, careers and graduate study.

 

GSOCI 210. Social Issues in a Global Context. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An examination of current global social issues, such as industrialization, economy, work, inequality, social movements and socio-political change. Addresses questions of definition, nature, history, patterns and consequences of various issues, using sociological perspectives to examine and critique proposed social policies.

 

SOCI 214. Social Deviance. 3 credits. Offered once an academic year.
Course offers students a wide range of explanations of deviance. Topics considered are the functions, social definitions, societal reactions and political aspects of deviance as characteristic of all societies. Deviant attributes as well as acts are considered.

 

GSOCI 240. Individual in Society. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course explores the importance of social structure, agency and symbolic interaction in the social construction of realities. It will examine major contributors to the sociological social psychological tradition. The course will help students reflect on issues such as self, self-presentation and identity, relationships, body, inequality, citizenship, nonconformity and resistance.

 

SOCI 265. Sociology of the Community. 3 credits.
Survey of community studies with special emphasis on definitions, development and modern community research.

 

SOCI 276. Sociology of the Family. 3 credits. Offered fall.
Covers the basic concepts and theories in marriage and the family; looks at basic issues in modern family life; examines changes in family functions and in the various stages of the family life cycle and discusses the future of the family in contemporary society.

 

SOCI/GERN 280. Social Gerontology. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of aging. The course provides an overview of issues surrounding aging in contemporary society: personal, familial, communal and societal.

 

SOCI 302. Business in American Society. 3 credits.
A sociological analysis of the American business corporation, interrelationships among businesses and the interplay between business, public opinion and government policy.

 

SOCI 303. Sociology of Death and Dying. 3 credits. Offered once an academic year.
Investigation of current American orientations toward death and dying with emphasis also given to the social organization of death and dying.

 

SOCI/ANTH 313. Processes of Social and Cultural Change. 3 credits. Offered spring.
Investigates the procedures through which a society operates and the manner in which it introduces and incorporates changes. Issues considered include belief, innovation, directed change, coercive change, revitalization and revolution.

 

SOCI 315. Science, Technology and Society. 3 credits.
Through an analysis of various issues, problems and case studies, this course will explore the interactions between science, technology and society. The course will examine connections of specific technologies to science, cultural values, social and economic interests and questions regarding progress.

 

SOCI 316. Space, Time and the Human Social Environment. 3 credits. Offered once an academic year.
This course will examine the impact of the configuration of space, time and social policy on social realities. Sociological critical theory will be used to analyze relationships between the physical and social environments. Prerequisite: SOCI 200.

 

SOCI 321. Politics in Society. 3 credits.
An examination of politics in American society from a sociological perspective. The relationship between society and politics, the nature and distribution of social power, political participation, political thought and politics as a vehicle for social change are explored.

 

SOCI/REL 322. Sociology of Religion. 3 credits.
A sociological analysis of religion. How it influences and is influenced by social existence.

 

SOCI 325. Criminology. 3 credits. Offered fall.
Study of the extent, causes and possible deterrents to crime including murder, assault, white-collar offenses and organized crime, with attention to the role of the victim and policy implications.

 

SOCI 327. Juvenile Delinquency. 3 credits. Offered spring.
Study of youth gangs, deviation and youth culture standards as well as the treatment used. Recent research reports will be emphasized.

 

SOCI/PSYC/KIN 329. Psychological and Sociological Aspects of Sport. 3 credits. Offered spring.
Study of the psychological and sociological implications of sport and the effect of sport on the United States and other cultures.

 

SOCI/SOWK 330. Corrections. 3 credits. Offered spring.
The history, philosophy, policies and problems of the treatment of violators by the police, courts and correctional institutions.

 

SOCI 331. Introduction to Sociological Analysis. 3 credits. Offered once an academic year.
Introduction to the techniques for collecting, describing, analyzing and presenting sociological data.

 

SOCI 334. Socialization and Society. 3 credits.
Sociological analysis of processes by which persons acquire roles and identities.

 

SOCI 336. Race and Ethnic Relations. 3 credits. Offered once an academic year.
Comparative study of the causes and consequences of racial and ethnic inequality in the United States and around the world. Black/white relations in the United States and South Africa, native American rights and other ethnic and racial issues are discussed.

 

SOCI 337. Sociology of Gender. 3 credits. Offered spring.
Examination of theories of sex role development, the roles of men and women in society and gender as a social construction.

 

SOCI 339. Sociology of Women. 3 credits. Offered spring.
Analysis of the structural position of women in society with emphasis on institutional frameworks such as economy, family, health, religion, sexuality, crime, etc.

 

SOCI 341. Sociology of Education. 3 credits.
Examination of sociological theories and research on education, emphasizing stratification, socialization, organization and relationship between schooling, family, community and work. Focus on cross cultural approaches to education. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or permission of instructor.

 

SOCI 344. Sociology of Work and Industry. 3 credits.
Examination of the problem of work in industrial societies, meanings and outcomes for individuals. This course will explore major industrial structures, the role of the individual in the work group and issues and policies affecting work and industry in contemporary society.

 

SOCI 345. Sociology of Occupations and Professions. 3 credits.
Examines work roles in American society with a focus on medicine, law and business. Topics include occupational organizations and professionalization; occupational ideology and community; occupational commitment and social character; and ways in which occupational careers impact and are impacted by society.

 

SOCI 346. Leisure in Contemporary Society. 3 credits.
Sociological analysis of leisure or nonwork in contemporary society with particular emphasis upon conceptual and human problems and the potentials of leisure in a context of social change.

 

SOCI/SOWK 348. Third World Societies: An Introduction. 3 credits. Offered once an academic year.
This course will provide a critical examination of Third World societies within the global system. The course will address theoretical frameworks used to analyze Third World problems. Special attention will be given to persistent problems in the areas of population, poverty, health care, housing and social welfare.

 

SOCI/ANTH 352. Birth, Death, Sex: Exploring Demography. 3 credits. Offered once an academic year.
Fertility (birth) and mortality (death) and their biological and social determinants in cross-cultural and evolutionary/ historical frameworks. Exploration of the dynamic between the material constraints on and symbolic significance of, reproduction, sexuality and death within a cultural context. Critical examination of population growth as a global "problem." Basic demographic methods. Prerequisite: Any lower level course in anthropology or sociology or permission of the instructor.

 

SOCI 354. Social and Cultural Stratification. 3 credits. Offered fall.
Course covers the systems of stratification in the United States including race, class, gender, religion, sexuality, ethnicity and nationality. Discussion will center on their role in providing rationales for oppression and discrimination in society and their relationship to the distribution of power and ideological control.

 

SOCI 360. Modern Social Movements. 3 credits.
Introduction to the study and analysis of social movements in the United States as agents of social and ideological change. Emphasis is given to movements which have goals of extending and/or protecting rights of individuals and groups in the face of increasing industrialization, urbanization and centralization of power.

 

SOCI 361. Bureaucracy and Society. 3 credits.
Study of organizations primarily in contemporary society such as corporations, prisons, hospitals, social and government agencies, trade unions, etc., their internal structures and processes, impact on individuals and relation to other social units in society.

 

SOCI/ANTH 368. Modern American Culture. 3 credits.
Analysis of American society as reflected in popular cultural forms. Cultural expressions such as music, literature, theater, films and sports will be examined as they reflect the values, quality of contemporary life and social structure of the United States.

 

SOCI 369. Law and Society. 3 credits.
The history and functions of law as a form of social control; the social forces in the creation and practice of the law. The nature of law as a catalyst for and the product of social change.

 

SOCI 375. Medical Sociology. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An introduction to the field of medical sociology that examines the salient issues in the field and related theoretical perspectives. These two focuses are important in understanding the ability of humans to live to capacity. Attention is given to health-care programs in developing countries as well as modern industrial societies.

 

SOCI 377. Lifestyles. 3 credits.
Examination of alternatives to the traditional nuclear family with analysis of relations to other societal institutions and of policy implications.

 

SOCI 378. Introduction to Africa-Centered Critical Theory and Cultural Studies. 3 credits. Offered fall.
This course introduces students to an alternative scientific world view based upon classical African philosophy and gives them the opportunity to discuss and consider the implications of this alternative vision of science on the conduct of research and on human affairs. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing required. Sophomores admitted with instructor's permission.

 

SOCI 379. Africentric Social Thought. 3 credits. Offered spring.
This course is a survey of African social philosophy and thought from individuals throughout various historical periods and locations including the collective community of diasporic Africans and those of African descent. Sociological data using traditional African philosophical perspectives on being, knowing, understanding and ethics will be examined. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.

 

SOCI 380. Critical Analysis. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An examination of the historical context and current status of the critical paradigm within sociology, including issues involved in critical understanding of and participation in modern society. Prerequisites: SOCI 200 and SOCI 201.

 

SOCI 382. Interpretive Analysis. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
A systematic introduction to the interpretive paradigm in sociology, including symbolic interactionism, ethnomethodology, phenomenology, existentialism and action theory. Prerequisites: SOCI 200 and SOCI 201.

 

SOCI 384. Naturalistic Analysis. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of social life through the traditional paradigm of naturalistic science, including exploration of the role of values in science, the logic of scientific procedure and ethical questions surrounding scientific inquiry. Prerequisites: SOCI 200, SOCI 201 and SOCI 331.

 

SOCI 391. Study Abroad. 1 to 6 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Designed to encourage students to enhance their academic programs through studying abroad. Arrangements must be made with a faculty member who will direct the study with preparatory instructions and final requirements. Prerequisites: Permission of Department Head

 

SOCI 395. Special Topics in Sociology. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Examination of selected topics which are of current importance in sociology. May be repeated for credit when course content changes.

 

SOCI 480. Senior Seminar in Sociology. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The integration of previous class experience the student has had during the undergraduate years. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major. Prerequisites: SOCI 380, SOCI 382 and SOCI 384.

 

SOCI/PUAD 482. Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice. 4 credits.
A research-oriented senior seminar providing an overview of the discipline of criminal justice and various approaches to research. The student will complete a major research project. Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of instructor.

 

SOCI 490. Special Studies in Sociology. 1-3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Designed to give capable students in sociology an opportunity to complete independent study under supervision. Prerequisites: Recommendation of the instructor and permission of the department head.

 

SOCI 492. Sociology Field Practicum. 1-3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Provides the student with practical experience in employing and refining sociological skills in a public or private agency under faculty supervision.

 

SOCI 499. Honors. 6 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Year course.

 

Social Work

Department of Social Work

SOWK 287. Introduction to Social Work. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An overview of the development of social work as a profession with emphasis upon various settings in which social work is practiced. The focus is on practical experiences designed to enable the student to gain familiarity with the dynamics of the profession. Corequisite: 20 hours community service-learning.

 

SOWK 288. Social Welfare. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The analysis of basic human needs, problems and resources in society (America and other selected countries). The study of the development of social welfare as an institution in society. The examination of current issues in social welfare services.

 

SOWK 301. Workshops in Social Work. 1-3 credits. Offered on a rotating basis.
Detailed study of a topic of interest in social work. May be repeated for credit.

 

SOWK 305. Social Work Research Methods. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of qualitative and quantitative methods in social work. Explanation of logic of scientific procedure. Formulation and design of social work research, including observation, questionnaires, interviews, use of existing sources, experiments, indirect techniques, evaluation research, analysis and interpretation of data. Publication and dissemination of results of social work research. Prerequisite: MATH 220 or SOCI 331.

 

SOWK 317. Introduction to Social Work Practice. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Self-awareness, analysis of worker and client value systems and an understanding of intervention are applied practically to aid students in developing skills in communication and interviewing.

 

SOWK 320. Human Behavior in the Social Environment. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Integration and expansion of prerequisite knowledge foundation in the biological, psychological and socio-cultural sciences as they apply to individuals, groups, families, organizations and communities. Particular attention is paid to minorities of color, women, sexual orientation and cultural diversity in a pluralistic society. Prerequisites: SOCI 101/GSOCI 210, SOCI 214, GPSYC 101, GPSYC 160; and SOCI 336/SOCI 354.

 

SOWK/GERN 325. Positive Aging: Elderhostel. 3 credits. Offered summer.
In this academic course and outreach program, JMU students are co-participants and co-learners with adults 55 and over attending the JMU Elderhostel.

 

SOWK/SOCI 330. Corrections. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The history, philosophy, policies and problems of the treatment of violators by the police, courts and correctional institutions.

 

SOWK 332. Community Mental Health Practice. 3 credits. Offered on a rotating basis.
Provides a basis for understanding mental health policy and services. Focus is on the needs of the deinstitutionalized mentally ill patient including psychosocial treatment and case management services. Outpatient services for the general public are also covered. Course contains a community service-learning component.

 

SOWK 335. Social Policy. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Study of the formulation and consequences of social policy in the context of contemporary social, political and economic conditions. Skill development in policy analysis, critique and change. Prerequisites: SOWK 288 and GPOSC 225 or POSC 302.

 

SOWK 338. Issues and Policies in Family Services. 3 credits. Offered on a rotating basis.
Examination of historical and philosophical approaches to family policy. Evolution of family-related social policies in the United States is contrasted with those of selected foreign countries with the view toward a national family policy.

 

SOWK 340. Violence in Families. 3 credits. Offered every other fall.
Examination of violence in the family, including spouse, sibling, elder and child abuse. Studies the social and cultural patterns and etiology of family violence. Examines programs and services for the abused and the abuser including shelters, support systems and counseling.

 

SOWK 342. Child Welfare Services. 3 credits. Offered on a rotating basis.
Study of the basic child welfare services-day care, homemakers, services to unwed parents, protective, foster care and adoption services-and the principle income maintenance programs as they affect children and their families. Analysis of legal framework and court services and such current issues as guardianship, educational and protective services.

 

SOWK/SOCI 348. Third World Societies: An Introduction. 3 credits. Offered on a rotating basis.
This course will provide a critical examination of Third World societies within the global system. The course will address theoretical frameworks used to analyze Third World problems. Special attention will be given to persistent problems in the areas of population, poverty, health care, housing and social welfare.

 

SOWK 350. Social Work Problems and Practices: A European Perspective. 3 credits. Offered summer.
The study of the formulation and consequences of social policy and methods of social work practices in a selected European country within the context of contemporary social, political, cultural and economic conditions. Comparisons and linkages will be made with current U.S. social polices and social work practices. Students will work with both U.S. and European social work faculty. Prerequisite: SOWK 288 or permission of the instructor.

 

SOWK 372. Social Work Practice with the Aged. 3 credits. Offered fall.
An examination of America's response to aged Americans from a historical and current perspective. Social problems and social work skills will be examined in light of individual, group and community needs and those affected by social policies.

 

SOWK/FAM/GERN 375. Grant Writing for Agencies. 3 credits. Offered on a rotating basis.
A collaborative course, which emphasizes active learning, teaches basic skills on proposal writing. Students and agency representatives learn the importance of grant writing for agencies/organizations and research projects often needed to complete graduate education. There is a potential for a grant submission by the end of the semester.

 

SOWK/FAM 385. Acting Out Teen Theatre. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Students are trained to facilitate a semester-long, weekly theater program with 12-18 year old middle and high school students. Students analyze group dynamics, apply theory and provide program structure. The semester ends with the teen production of an original script.

 

SOWK/FAM 386. Acting OutREACH. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Students learn about issues currently facing teens, parents and schools. Students are trained to apply theory and function as staff for the Acting OutREACH Program. Students take issue-centered programs to alternative education and after-school programs at middle and high schools in the community.

 

SOWK 387. Working with Teenagers. 3 credits. Offered every other fall.
Survey of physical, psychological and social theories of adolescent development. Examination of service delivery issues in working with teenagers. Investigation of topical areas of particular relevance to work with adolescents including sexuality, abuse and neglect, runaways, depression and suicide and substance abuse.

 

SOWK 442. Social Work in Health Care. 3 credits. Offered on a rotating basis.
The impact of illness and disability on the person, family and community is studied. The social responses currently provided and those being developed are emphasized. Explores psychosocial assessment methods; prevention, crisis intervention and rehabilitation strategies; and interdisciplinary teamwork in health care.

 

SOWK 465. Social Work Practice in Mezzo Systems. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Application of social work values, knowledge and methods with families and small groups is emphasized. Assessment, planning intervention strategies, resource utilization and evaluation are examined. Role play and group processing are utilized. Prerequisites: SOWK 305, SOWK 317, SOWK 320, SOWK 335 and admission to the Social Work Program. Corequisites: SOWK 466 and SOWK 467.

 

SOWK 466. Social Work Practice in Micro Systems. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Application of social work values, knowledge and methods with individuals within the family context is emphasized. Case assessment, planning intervention strategies, resource utilization and evaluation are examined. Role play and videotaping are utilized. Prerequisites: SOWK 305, SOWK 317, SOWK 320, SOWK 335 and admission to the Social Work Program. Corequisites: SOWK 465 and SOWK467.

 

SOWK 467. Social Work Practice in Macro Systems. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Social work skill development and practice in the application of knowledge, skills and methods to the macro systems of professional practice including neighborhoods, communities and organizations. Prerequisites: SOWK 305, SOWK 317, SOWK 320, SOWK 335 and admission to the Social Work Program. Corequisites: SOWK 465 and SOWK 466.

 

SOWK 481. Social Work Field Practicum I (Block Plan). 6 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Offers students an opportunity to gain a broad knowledge of the basic functions, services and roles of the agency as related to actual social work practice, as well as a specific knowledge of practical intervention skills necessary to effective social work practice. The field experience is the application of knowledge and skill components drawn from previous courses. Prerequisite: Admission to the field practicum. Social work majors only. Senior Standing.

 

SOWK 482. Social Work Field Practicum II (Block Plan). 6 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Offers students an opportunity to build upon previous field experience by having more responsibility and tasks designed to expand their practice skills in social work. Prerequisites: SOWK 481. Social work majors only.

 

SOWK 487. Special Topics in Social Work. 3 credits. Offered on a rotating basis.
Examination of selected topics of social work practice that are of current importance in the social work profession. Course may be repeated for credit.

 

SOWK 490. Special Studies in Social Work. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course is restricted to majors in social work. The course provides capable students an opportunity to complete independent studies under faculty supervision. Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Recommendation of the instructor and permission of the department head.

 

SOWK 494. Senior Seminar in Social Work. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The integration of the classroom and field practicum experience that the student has had during the undergraduate years, into a synthesis, which will provide a firm foundation upon which to begin professional social work practice. Senior outcome assessment is integral to this course. Prerequisite: Social work majors only. Corequisite: Field Practicum.

 

SOWK 499. Honors. 6 credits. Year course. Offered fall and spring.
Independent research topic initiated and completed by qualified second semester junior social work majors.

 

Spanish

Department of Foreign Language and Literatures

SPAN 101-102. Elementary Spanish (4, 1). 4 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring.
The fundamentals of Spanish through listening, speaking, reading and writing. Practice in pronunciation and development of comprehension. One hour's work a week in the language laboratory.

 

SPAN 109. Accelerated Review of Elementary Spanish (3, 1). 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Reviews elementary Spanish grammar, reading, writing, speaking and listening skills in Spanish. One hour of work a week in the language laboratory. For students who have had no more than two or three years of Spanish in high school or qualify through the placement exam. Prerequisite: Permission of the department head.

 

SPAN 111-212. Intensive Spanish (6, 1). 6 credits each term. Offered May and summer.
This intensive course covers two years of Spanish in one. The first semester is equivalent to elementary Spanish and the second semester to intermediate Spanish. Practice in pronunciation and development of comprehension. One hour of work a week in the language laboratory. (Offered May and Summer term only.)

 

SPAN 231-232. Intermediate Spanish. 3 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring.
A thorough review of grammar, vocabulary building, conversation, composition and reading. Prerequisite: One year of college Spanish or equivalent.

 

SPAN 280. Technical Spanish Language. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course is designed to give students knowledge in the Spanish vocabulary needed to communicate with clients and patients in the fields of medical, judiciary and computer sciences. This course is required for those students who are minors in translation. Prerequisite: SPAN 232

 

SPAN 300. Spanish Conversation and Composition. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Intensive training in the use and comprehension of modern, everyday Spanish with emphasis on conversation and composition to give students confidence in expressing themselves in simple idiomatic Spanish. Instruction is in Spanish. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major. Prerequisite: SPAN 232 or equivalent.

 

SPAN 305. Advanced Reading. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course is designed to prepare students in literary analysis of the novel as well as short stories and poetry. All necessary terminology will be studied. Mandatory for all Spanish majors before taking any other literature class. Instruction in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 300.

 

SPAN 307. Spanish Civilization. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
A study of Spanish life and culture from ancient times to the present. Instruction is in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 300.

 

SPAN 308. Latin American Civilization. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
A study of the geographical, historical and cultural development of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to the present. Instruction is in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 300.

 

SPAN 315. Spanish Phonetics. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Intensive drill in Spanish sounds and intonation patterns. Continued emphasis upon conversation. Instruction is in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 232 or equivalent.

 

SPAN 320. Advanced Spanish Grammar. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Advanced course in morphology and syntax with extensive practice in composition. Instruction is in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 300 or equivalent.

 

SPAN 325. Advanced Oral and Written Practice in Spanish. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Intensive practice of conversation and composition in Spanish with emphasis on grammar and style. Instruction is in Spanish. The course is recommended to students who need practice in grammar. Counts as an elective for Spanish majors and minors. Prerequisite: SPAN 300.

 

SPAN 330. Business Spanish. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
A study of commercial and technical vocabulary and trade customs in conjunction with practice in the art of commercial communication including interviews, letter writing and simultaneous interpretation. Instruction is in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 300.

 

SPAN 385. Latin American Drama and Short Stories. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Reading and analysis of representative plays and short stories from Latin America. Student reports on selected authors. Instruction is in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 305.

 

SPAN 390. Spanish Poetry of the 20th Century. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The course will cover poets such as Antonio Machado, Luis Cernuda, Pedro Salinas and Frederico Garcia Lorca. A complete study of the chronology, historical situation, social context and cultural impact of the poets and their works. Prerequisite: SPAN 305

 

SPAN 395. Latin American Poetry of the 20th Century. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course will study poets such as Jose Juan Tablada, Ramon Lopez Velarde, Gabriela Mistral, Pablo Neruda, Cesar Vallejo. Life, works, chronology, historical situation, social context and influences, tendencies and valuations. Instruction in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 305

 
SPAN 400. Advanced Conversation. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Discussions deal with topics of current interest. Instruction is in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 300 or equivalent.
 

SPAN 405. Spanish Novels of the 19th and 20th Centuries. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The development of the Spanish novel from the "costumbristas" through the realism of Galdos and from the writers of the Generation of 1898 to the present. Instruction is in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 305.

 

SPAN 406. Spanish Drama of the 19th and 20th Centuries. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Readings and discussions of representative works of Spanish drama from the Romantic period to the present. Instruction is in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 305.

 

SPAN 407. Aspects of Spanish Civilization. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Studies in Spanish art and culture. Studies in the social development that has taken place in Spain after Franco. The course will also cover the influence of Spain in Europe as well as in Latin America. Instruction is in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 307

 

SPAN 408. Aspects of Latin American Civilization. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The development of countries like Argentina, Colombia, Perú, Mexico and others from pre-Columbian times to the present. Emphasis on the indigenous and European cultures and their influences on contemporary traditions. Focus on Central America, political developments and revolutions and wars within the last two decades. Instruction is in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 308.

 

SPAN 415. The Spanish-American Novel. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Reading and analysis of representative works of Spanish-American novelists of the 19th and 20th centuries. Instruction is in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 305.

 

SPAN 425. Prose of the Golden Age. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
A study of the chivalric, sentimental, pastoral and picaresque genres of prose literature and of their development through the Golden Age, culminating in Cervantes. Instruction is in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 305.

 

SPAN 426. Drama of the Golden Age. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
A study of the "comedia" of the Golden Age including works of Lope de Vega, Calderon de la Barca, Tirso de Molina and Ruiz de Alarcon. Instruction is in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 305.

 

SPAN 427. Poetry of the Golden Age. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Lecture and analysis of Spanish Poetry beginning with the Renaissance through the end of the 17th Century. The course will cover poets such as Garcilaso de la Vega, Fray Luis de Leon, and San Juan da la Cruz. Instruction in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 305.

 

SPAN 460. Post War Literature in Spain. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Reading and analysis of representative works of Spanish novelists and their development after the Civil War in Spain. Emphasis on Spanish history and society under the influence of Franco's Regime. Instruction is in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 305.

 

SPAN 485. Cinema and Literature. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Studies of the structure of the cinema and its relation to literature. Comparison between different literary works and their interpretation in cinema. The course will cover topics in Spain and Latin America. Instruction in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 305.

 

Special Education

School of Education

SPED 200. Nature and Issues of Disabilities. 3 credits.
The nature, needs and problems of exceptional children and how these relate to educational provisions are studied. The status of the disabled in society will be emphasized. Federal and state laws ensuring the rights of the disabled will be stressed.

 

SPED 202. Field Experiences in Special Education. 3 credits.
Provides students with supervised experiences with persons with disabilities. Placements are made in various settings including schools, institutions and recreational programs. Prerequisite: SPEC 200 or permission of the instructor.

 

SPED 300. Educational Technology for Students with Disabilities. 1 credit.
An introduction to instructional technology for persons with disabilities. The role of assistive technology in the educational process is investigated. Students are exposed to a variety of instructional programs and equipment. Federal and state guidelines, interdisciplinary team functioning, and program as well as equipment selection are addressed.

 

SPED 310. Survey of Emotional/Behavioral Disorders. 2 credits.
A detailed study of the characteristics, diagnosis, treatment, assessment and education of individuals with emotional/behavioral disorders. Medical, psychological, behavioral and environmental causes are presented as well as therapeutic interventions, educational resources and instructional strategies. Prerequisite: SPED 200 or permission of the instructor.

 

SPED 312. Field Experience in Special Education and Diversity. 1 credit.
Students devote 30 clock hours to activities in school and nonschool settings that emphasize diversity of individuals and families. Corequisite: EDUC 310.

 

SPED 320. Survey of Learning Disabilities. 2 credits.
A detailed study of the theories, characteristics, etiology and needs of individuals with learning disabilities including ADHD. Focus will be on causation and terminology as well as historical perspectives and current trends related to practices in identification and treatment of learning disabilities. Prerequisite: SPED 200 or permission of the instructor.

 

SPED 330. Survey of Mental Retardation. 2 credits.
A detailed study of the characteristics, diagnosis, treatment and education of individuals with mental retardation. Medical aspects and implications for support needs are addressed as well as educational settings, resources and instructional techniques designed to facilitate integration for individuals with mental retardation. Prerequisite: SPED 200 or permission of the instructor.

 

SPED 340. Classroom Observations in Special Education. 1 credit.
This practicum experience will provide an opportunity to observe the learning and behavioral characteristics of students with learning disabilities, mental retardation and emotional disturbance in various educational settings. Corequisites: SPED 310, SPED 320 and SPED 330.

 

SPED 350. Psychoeducational Assessment of Learning and Behavior Problems. 3 credits.
A detailed study of psychoeducational assessment procedures and instruments for eligibility, instructional planning and evaluation for students with mental retardation, learning disabilities and emotional disturbance. The course emphasizes skills in administering formal and informal instruments, interpreting results, and formulating individual educational plans based on assessment findings. Prerequisites: SPED 200, SPED 310, SPED 320, and SPED 330 or permission of the instructor.

 

SPED 401. Problems in Special Education. 1-3 credits.
Considers current problems and issues in special education as they relate to the professional education of teachers.

 

SPED 420. Developing and Managing the Special Education Instructional Program. 1 credits.
This course explores the practical skills and strategies needed to develop and implement programming for K-12 special education students. Skills will be applicable in consultative, self-contained, resource and integrated settings. Corequisites: SPED 350.

 

SPED 430. Practicum in General Education Methods. 2 credits.
This practicum experience is designed to enhance understanding of the scope and sequence of the general education curriculum, explore the impact of state curriculum standards and provide an opportunity to observe teaching methods in language arts and mathematics. Corequisites: READ 430, MIED 530 and EDUC 430.

 

SPED 440. Classroom Management and Professional Collaboration. 3 credits.
A focus on techniques used to manage the behavior of students. Emphasized are strategies used to prevent inappropriate behavior from occurring and/or worsening. Other interventions are taught such as techniques for working with others (e.g., parents, teachers and administrators) who may provide behavior management assistance to teachers and administrators.

 

SPED 450. Principles of Specialized Reading Instruction. 3 credits.
The content of this course will focus on the acquisition and development of reading skills for students with disabilities. Content will include: characteristics of students with reading disabilities; informal assessment strategies; the relationship of oral language to reading; stage-development of reading skills; research-based instructional methods; principles of specialized reading instruction; scientifically-based reading programs for students with disabilities; and collaboration with parents to enhance students' reading skills. Prerequisite: READ 430.

 

SPED 470. Directed Practicum in Special Education. 2 credits.
This practicum course provides a structured supervised experience teaching students with disabilities. Application of skills in planning direct instruction, creating instructional materials, collecting performance data, managing behavior and developing social skills will be emphasized. Corequisites: SPED 420, SPED 500, SPED 510.

 

SPED 460. Differentiation of Instruction and Academic Collaboration. 3 credits.
This course assists preservice teachers in using their understanding of exceptional learners and learning to accommodate the diversity of students in the general education classroom. In addition, preservice teachers will explore the roles of teachers and how general and special education teachers collaborate to meet the needs of exceptional students.

 

SPED 490. Special Studies in Special Education. 1-3 credits each semester.
Designed to allow the student to complete independent study under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of the program coordinator.

 

SPED 499. Honors. 6 credits.
See catalog descriptions titled "Graduation with Distinction" and "Graduation with Honors."

 

Regularly Scheduled Studies Abroad Courses

Semester in Antwerp

COB 300A. Integrated Functional Systems: Management. 3 credits.
COB 300A is the management component of an integrated learning experience consisting of four courses, taken concurrently, which introduces the fundamental conceptual tools of management, finance, operation and marketing in such a way as to establish their mutual relevance and interdependence. Students work in small project teams on tasks designed to require the application in concert of conceptual tools from each of the function areas. Prerequisites: Completion of all required 100 and 200 B.B.A. core courses, demonstrated computer competencies; junior standing (56 hours) and a cumulative 2.5 grade point average in all courses taken at JMU.

 

COB 300B. Integrated Functional Systems: Finance. 3 credits.
COB 300B is the finance component of an integrated learning experience consisting of four courses, taken concurrently, which introduces the fundamental conceptual tools of management, finance, operation and marketing in such a way as to establish their mutual relevance and interdependence. Students work in small project teams on tasks designed to require the application in concert of conceptual tools from each of the function areas. Prerequisite: Completion of all required 100 and 200 B.B.A. core courses, demonstrated computer competencies; junior standing (56 hours) and a cumulative 2.5 grade point average in all courses taken at JMU.

 

COB 300C. Integrated Functional Systems: Operations. 3 credits
COB 300C is the operations component of an integrated learning experience consisting of four courses, taken concurrently, which introduces the fundamental conceptual tools of management, finance, operation and marketing in such a way as to establish their mutual relevance and interdependence. Students work in small project teams on tasks designed to require the application in concert of conceptual tools from each of the function areas. Prerequisites: Completion of all required 100 and 200 B.B.A. core courses, demonstrated computer competencies; junior standing (56 hours) and a cumulative 2.5 grade point average in all courses taken at JMU.

 

COB 300D. Integrated Functional Systems: Marketing. 3 credits
COB 300D is the marketing component of an integrated learning experience consisting of four courses, taken concurrently, which introduces the fundamental conceptual tools of management, finance, operation and marketing in such a way as to establish their mutual relevance and interdependence. Students work in small project teams on tasks designed to require the application in concert of conceptual tools from each of the function areas. Prerequisites: Completion of all required 100 and 200 B.B.A. core courses, demonstrated computer competencies; junior standing (56 hours) and a cumulative 2.5 grade point average in all courses taken at JMU.

 

COB 301. European Integration, Culture and History. 3 credits.
This course is designed to complement COB 300 A-D when taught as part of the semester in Antwerp, Belgium program. COB 301 will only be offered as part of the semester in Antwerp program. Students will study European Integration in the classroom and visit governmental institutions, historical places and cultural events associated with course content. Prerequisites: COB 241, COB 242, ECON 201 and acceptance to the semester in Antwerp program.

 

Semester in Florence

*ARTH 313. Italian Renaissance Art. 3 credits.
Exploration of the invention of perspective and techniques of Renaissance realism including masterpieces by major artists such as Giotto, Donatello & Michaelangelo. Weekly visits to museums and churches. Taught in English.

 

*ENG 302. Dante's Commedia, Selections from Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso. 3 credits.
Dante's Commedia, a vision of the other-world, the account of a journey through Hell, Purgatory and Paradise, is one of the world's greatest poems, an achievement of the poetic imagination. Students will also see how the Commedia inspired the work of later British and American writers, and will see how the forms of literature Dante shaped have endured to modern times. Taught in English; Italian majors & minors may receive Italian credit by completing all written assignments in Italian.

 

ENG 380F/ITAL 465/SMAD 460F. Italian Cinema 1930-1980. 3 credits.
Literary and visual analysis of the work of major Italian filmmakers such as Fellini and Visconti and others. Weekly film viewing. Taught in English; Italian majors & minors may receive Italian credit by completing all written assignments in Italian.

 

*GHUM 250F. The Florentine Enlightenment; Humanism in Florence. 3 credits.
This course aims at introducing students to the spirit and lesson of the Humanism movement. Lectures, seminars, and readings are meant to help students develop a sense of the historical tradition, and at the same time understand the importance of studia humanitatis. Humanism is a passage from an age of heroes and knights to an age of bourgeois society, from faith and authority to free reason and enterprise, from asceticism and symbolism to the study of nature, from a God-centered world to a human-centered one. Taught in English.

 

ITAL 101. Elementary Italian. 3 credits.
Emphasis on speaking (pronunciation, vocabulary, comprehension); grammar and reading up to the intermediate level.

 

ITAL 102. Elementary Italian. 3 credits.
Emphasis on speaking (pronunciation, vocabulary, comprehension); grammar and reading up to the intermediate level.

 

ITAL 231. Intermediate to Advanced Italian. 3 credits.
Review of grammar and syntax; development of reading and writing skills; improvement of listening comprehension and fluency.

 

ITAL 232. Intermediate to Advanced Italian. 3 credits.
Review of grammar and syntax; development of reading and writing skills; improvement of listening comprehension and fluency.

 

ITAL 300. Italian Conversation and Composition. 3 credits.
Intensive training in the use and comprehension of modern everyday Italian. Emphasis on conversation and composition to give students the confidence to express themselves in idiomatic Italian. Taught in Italian.

 

ITAL 320. Advanced Italian Grammar. 3 credits.
Advanced course concentrating on the development of writing skills and oral communication. Emphasis in morphology and syntax with extensive practice in composition. Taught in Italian.

 

ITAL 335. Introduction to Italian Literature. 3 credits.
A survey of Italian literature from its beginning to the present. Textual analysis of sample writings representative of the most important literary movements. Taught in Italian.

 

GMUS 200F. Music in General Culture. 3 credits.
Study of music from the Classic Western heritage including Gregorian chant, symphonic music, and comic opera. Students attend concerts. Taught in English.

 

POSC 361F. The Integration of Europe. 3 credits.
Italy's place in the development of the European Union and related economic and political issues. Taught in English.

 

Semester in London

*ARTH 315. Masterpieces of British Architecture. 3 credits.
The history and theory of British architecture. Visits to the outstanding structures in England from prehistoric to modern times.

 

*ARTH 316. Masterpieces of British Art. 3 credits.
Survey of painting and sculpture in Britain from 1530 to 1860, concentrating on 18th and 19th century painting with some consideration given to contemporary works. British art is viewed in the context of European civilization. Weekly visits to London museums.

 

*ENG 302R. London in Literature. 3 credits.
The world of London as reflected in selected literary forms and texts from the 16th century to the present day. Weekly outings visit historic sites connected with the assigned readings.

 

*ENG 458. Shakespeare in Performance. 3 credits.
Shakespeare's work on the English stage. The course is conducted at Shakespeare's Globe, Bankside, and includes lectures, professional productions, and student scenes performed on the Globe stage. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: Permission of Director.

 

*GHUM 200/THEA 449. The London Theatre. 3 credits.
A survey of drama, classical through contemporary, from the London stage. Weekly plays from the London stage, including an overnight visit to Stratford-On-Avon.

 

HIST 392L. English Social History from the Industrial Revolution to the Present. 3 credits.
An introduction to the social history of England from the 18th century to contemporary times. Weekly outings to museums and sites of historic interest.

 

*GMUS 200L. Music in General Culture. 3 credits.
Study of music from the classic Western heritage. Other types of music will be considered, including some attention to contemporary and popular forms. Weekly concerts.

 

POSC 361L. British Legal and Political Institutions. 3 credits.
An introduction to English government and law. Outings include visits to Parliament, trials and other events of political and legal import.

 

Semester in Martinique

FR 308. Contemporary French Civilization. 3 credits.
A study of French life and culture with emphasis on contemporary France. Prerequisite: FR 300 or equivalent.

 

FR 320. Advanced French Grammar. 3 credits.
Advanced course in morphology and syntax with extensive practice in composition. Prerequisite: FR 300 or equivalent.

 

FR 400. Advanced Conversation. 3 credits.
Discussions deal with topics of current interest. Prerequisite: FR 320.

 

FR 440. Stylistics and Translation. 3 credits.
An intensive course in writing and translation from and into English and French. Contemporary topics taken from various fields. Comparative terminology. Prerequisite: FR 300 or equivalent.

 

*FR 446D. Caribbean Literature. 3 credits.
A survey of the literary achievement of novelists and poets of the Caribbean. The works will highlight the social, political and educational aspects of French West Indian life within the Caribbean. Prerequisite: FR 300 or equivalent.

 

*FR 490A. Martinican Civilization. 3 credits.
Global study of French Caribbean life and culture through past and present history with emphasis on Martinique. Prerequisite: FR 300 or equivalent.

 

Semester in Salamanca

*ARTH 314/Spanish 490. Spanish Art. 3 credits.
A study of the art and architecture of Spain from medieval times through present. Concentration on specific artists, as well as general movements in the history of Spanish art. Since it is taught in Spanish, Spanish credit may also be given. Prerequisite: SPAN 300 or equivalent.

 

ECON 312. Comparative Economic Systems. 3 credits.
An examination of the distinguishing characteristics, institutions, and performances of the economic system of Spain and the United States.

 

IBUS 498S. Special Topics in International Business. 3 credits.
Study of European Economic Community with focus on economic integration, historical aspects of the community in Europe, the United Market, the community budget, common commercial politics, common agrarian politics, common transportation politics, regional development politics, other fields of community action and economic and monetary union.

 

POSC 361S. Comparative Politics: Spain /United States. 3 credits.
A comparative study of political systems in Spain and the United States. Emphasis on historical and contemporary issues.

 

SPAN 300. Spanish Conversation and Composition. 3 credits.
Intensive training in the use and comprehension of modern everyday Spanish with emphasis upon conversation and composition to give students confidence in expressing themselves in simple idiomatic Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 232 or equivalent.

 

SPAN 307. History of Spanish Civilization. 3 credits.
Study of Spanish life and culture and the outstanding contributions of Spain to world civilization. Review of historical and contemporary figures. Prerequisite: SPAN 232 or equivalent.

 

SPAN 308. Latin American Civilization. 3 credits.
Study of the geographical, historical and cultural development of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to the present. Prerequisite: SPAN 300 or equivalent.

 

SPAN 315. Phonetics. 3 credits.
Intensive drills in Spanish sounds and intonation patterns. Continued emphasis on conversation. Prerequisite: SPAN 232 or equivalent.

 

SPAN 320. Advanced Grammar. 3 credits.
Advanced course in morphology and syntax with extensive practice in composition. Prerequisite: SPAN 300 or equivalent.

 

SPAN 330. Business Spanish. 3 credits.
Study of commercial and technical vocabulary and trade customs in conjunction with practice in the art of commercial communication including interviews, letter writing and simultaneous interpretation. Prerequisite: SPAN 300 or equivalent.

 

*SPAN 385. Spanish Literature. 3 credits.
Readings and discussions of works of literature. Analysis and practice in critical compositions and research papers. Instruction is entirely in Spanish. Prerequisite: Three years of college Spanish or equivalent.

 

SPAN 400. Advanced Conversation and Composition. 3 credits.
Discussions in Spanish dealing with topics of current interests. Prerequisite: SPAN 300 or equivalent.

 

SPAN 490. Special Studies - Spanish Civilization II. 3 credits.
The study of the influence of the Arabic culture on the history of Spain.

 

*SPAN 490. Special Studies - Spanish Cinema and Literature. 3 credits.
Comparative studies between cinema and literature.