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Recreation

Department of Kinesiology and Recreation Studies 

REC/KIN 199. New Directions in Kinesiology and Recreation. 1-3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
In-depth exploration of topics significant in kinesiology. The topic for each semester will be announced on e-campus.

 

REC/KIN 201. Introduction to Kinesiology and Recreation. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Students are introduced to the discipline of kinesiology and recreation. They will study the effects of physical activity on human beings; survey the subdisciplines, including exercise physiology, biomechanics, motor behavior and sociological, historical and philosophical perspectives; and discuss how the discipline can be applied professionally.

 

REC/KIN 202. Biological Foundations of Kinesiology and Recreation. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Introduction to the biological scientific foundations within the discipline of kinesiology and recreation. Includes applied anatomy and physiology, biomechanics and exercise physiology. Prerequisite: KIN 201.

 

REC/REC 203. Social/Psychological Foundations of Kinesiology and Recreation. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The focus of this course is on exploring the socio/psychological perspectives of participation in activity through the lifespan. Prerequisite: KIN 201.

 

REC 241. Introduction to Recreation and Leisure Services. 3 credits. Offered fall.
Introduces the recreation/leisure professions in governmental, voluntary and commercial settings. Outlines development of recreation and evolution of leisure services. Overviews professional preparation in leisure management and therapeutic recreation.

 

REC 242. Leisure in a Diverse Society. 3 credits. Offered spring.
This is an introductory course for recreation majors and minors that exposes the future professional to disabilities and disability issues. This course is part of the recreation core required for therapeutic recreation and recreation management students. Lab and field observations required. Prerequisite: REC 241 or permission of instructor.

 

REC 330. Programming and Leadership in Recreation. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Fundamentals of program planning exploring the purpose and function of programs, planning principles, goals and objectives, organizational behavior and evaluation. Class includes a study of the theory, principles and processes of leadership in the delivery of recreation programs for a variety of populations. Lab and field observations required. Prerequisite: REC 241, REC 242 or permission of instructor.

 

REC 332. Perspectives of Outdoor Recreation. 3 credits. Offered fall and summer.
An orientation to the field of outdoor recreation. Attention is given to trends, resources, economic and social values, management approaches, ecological and educational implications, goals, ethics and professional opportunities. Prerequisite: REC 241 or permission of the instructor.

 

REC/KIN 333. Management in Sport, Recreation and Fitness Settings. 3 credits. Offered fall.
This course is designed as an introduction to sport, fitness and recreation management. Students will examine a variety of management issues and opportunities in these areas. Prerequisite: REC 241 or permission of instructor.

 

REC 344. Principles of Therapeutic Recreation. 3 credits. Offered fall.
Examination of the profession of therapeutic recreation by analyzing the history, philosophy, concepts, roles and functions involved in providing therapeutic recreation services to individuals with differing needs. Prerequisite: REC 241.

 

REC 401. Practicum in Recreation and Leisure Studies. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course provides students with an opportunity to practice the professional skills and competencies associated with specializations in recreation and leisure in a real-world setting. It is supervised by a highly qualified and experienced professional.

 

REC 402. Internship in Recreation and Leisure Studies. 12 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course provides students with 480 hours of full-time professional experience in the student's chosen area of recreation emphasis. The professional experience must be at an approved recreation agency and must be supervised by a highly qualified, experienced professional in the field of recreation. All course work must be completed prior to registration for the internship experience.

 

REC/KIN 411. Measurement and Evaluation in Kinesiology and Recreation. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
The administration and interpretation of measurement and evaluation procedures in kinesiology and recreation.

 

REC/KIN 436. Facilities Planning and Management in Sport and Recreation. 3 credits. Offered fall.
The purpose of this course is to enhance the understanding and skills necessary to be part of a facilities planning team and assume an entry-level facilities management position. Prerequisite: REC 241, REC 333, REC 420, REC 430 or permission of instructor.

 

REC 444. Therapeutic Recreation Assessment and Evaluation. 3 credits. Offered spring.
Examination of principles and procedures applicable to client assessment, activity analysis, goal identification, treatment planning, documentation and evaluation. Program interventions for physically and psychologically disabled populations. Prerequisites: REC 241 and REC 344.

 

REC 445. Clinical Aspects of Therapeutic Recreation. 3 credits. Offered fall.
Experiential examination of the therapeutic recreation process using a comprehensive and systematic service design. Includes full range of intervention strategies and facilitation techniques specific to the needs of special populations. Prerequisites: REC 241, REC 344, REC 420 and REC 444.

 

REC 446. Facilitation Management in Therapeutic Recreation. 3 credits. Offered spring.
Discussion of implementation of therapeutic recreation services in a variety of settings. Emphasis is directed to implementation of services to meet the goals of the agency and the needs of the clients. Prerequisite: REC 241, REC 344, REC 420, REC 444, REC 445 or permission of instructor.

 

REC 450. Commercial Recreation and Tourism. 3 credits. Offered spring.
A study of the nature and function of recreation in commercial and tourism environments, covering the introductory information about commercial enterprises and the practical concepts involved with managing or owning an enterprise. Course also covers an introduction to the principles of travel and tourism with an emphasis on the economic significance of tourism. Prerequisite: REC 241, REC 333, REC 346, REC 430 or permission of the instructor.

 

REC 451. Conference and Convention Planning and Management. 3 credits. Offered fall and summer.
Prepares students for positions as planners and managers of meetings, conferences and conventions at resorts, hotels, cruise ships, camps, universities, or other private or municipal convention centers. Provides students with a basic understanding of planning, managing and servicing conferences and conventions. Prerequisite: REC 241, REC 333, REC 420, REC 430, REC 436 or permission of the instructor.

 

REC 452. Sport and Recreation Facility Maintenance and Operations. 3 credits. Offered fall and summer.
This course will provide an in-depth understanding and practical knowledge of the problems, principles and techniques of maintenance and operations of selected park, recreation and leisure facilities, including commercial and private facilities, with an emphasis on the planning and management for maintenance efficiency. Prerequisite: REC 241, REC 333, REC 420, REC 430, REC 436 or permission of the instructor.

 

REC/SOCI 453. Philosophy of Recreation and Leisure. 3 credits. Offered fall.
An examination of the philosophical tenets of the parks and recreation profession, as well as the relating philosophies of other components of the leisure industry with a review of theories, concepts, and doctrines. This course is designed for senior level majors and minors only unless the instructor gives permission, as this is the senior capstone class. Prerequisites: REC 202, REC 203, REC 242, REC 330, REC 333, and REC 411.

 

REC/KIN 490. Special Studies in Kinesiology and Recreation. 1-3 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring.
Designed to give superior students in Kinesiology and Recreation an opportunity to complete independent study and/or research under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of the department head.

 

REC/KIN 499. Honors. 6 credits. Year course. Offered fall and spring.

 

Religion

Department of Philosophy & Religion

GREL 101. Religions of the World. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
An investigation of the world's major religions which will give attention to their origin, history, mythology and doctrines

 

REL/HEBR 131-132. Elementary Biblical Hebrew. 4 credits each semester.
An introductory course for students who intend to acquire the ability to read the Massoretic text of the Bible. Systematic study of the fundamentals of grammar, with emphasis on reading, pronunciation and translation.

 

REL/HEBR 231-232. Intermediate Biblical Hebrew. 3 credits each semester.
An intensive reading course. Selections from the Massoretic text of the Bible. An introduction to the critical apparatus used within the Massoretic text as well as the variant reading apparatus printed in the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia. Prerequisite: One year of college biblical Hebrew or equivalent.

 

REL 200. Exploring Religion. 3 credits.
An examination of the various components in the study of religion including myths, rituals, mystical experiences, theologies, ethics and current issues. Examples will be taken from the sacred texts, rituals and the lives of religious personalities in traditions around the world.

 

REL 201. Introduction to Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
A study of selected texts from the books of Genesis-Malachi that will examine their literary, historical and theological dimensions from the perspective of their ancient Israelite and Judahite contexts.

 

REL 202. Introduction to the New Testament. 3 credits.
This course discusses the literature of the New Testament in light of the historical, social and religious conditions from which it emerged. Particular attention is given to historical issues related to Jesus and the origins of Christianity.

 

REL/PHIL 218. Philosophy of Religion. 3 credits.
An intensive examination of religion from the standpoint of philosophical thinking with particular emphasis on the way philosophers view such problems as the existence of God, evil, immortality, religious language, etc.

 

REL/PHIL 218. Philosophy of Religion. 3 credits.
An intensive examination of religion from the standpoint of philosophical thinking with particular emphasis on the way philosophers view such problems as the existence of God, evil, immortality, religious language, etc.

 

REL/HEBR 231-232. Intermediate Biblical Hebrew. 3 credits each semester.
An intensive reading course. Selections from the Massoretic text of the Bible. An introduction to the critical apparatus used within the Massoretic text as well as the variant reading apparatus printed in the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia. Prerequisite: One year of college biblical Hebrew or equivalent.

 

REL 240. Jesus and the Moral Life. 3 credits.
This is an introductory course that focuses on the ways in which the moral teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, explored from both historical and multi-cultural perspectives, informed and continues to inform personal ideals and moral visions of society.

 

REL 270. Religious Ethics. 3 credits.
An investigation of the historical development of religious values and moral concepts in the Western religious traditions of Judaism, Roman Catholicism and Protestantism.

 

REL 300. Selected Topics in Religion. 3 credits.
Selected topics in religion are studied in depth. See e-campus for current topic. Course may be repeated for credit when content changes.

 

REL 310. Religions of India. 3 credits.
An introduction to the thought and practice of four major religious traditions of India: Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism and Islam. Topics include myth, ritual, yoga and meditation, philosophy, community and devotionalism.

 

REL 312. Religions of East Asia. 3 credits.
An introduction to the religions of China and Japan, including Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, Shinto, Folk Religions and the "New Religions" of Japan. Attention to the role of religion in the family and the state, classic texts, the importance of nature and expressions of spirituality in the fine arts.

 

REL 315. Women and Religion. 3 credits.
Study of women and world religions, historically and today, emphasizing Buddhism, religions of China and Japan, Judaism and Christianity. The variety of women's religious roles and practices are studied in a comparative context. Feminist scholarship's proposals for revising our understanding of religious history and reforming religious traditions.

 

REL 320. Judaism. 3 credits.
An examination of the beliefs, practices and historical development of the various forms of Judaism represented in America today: Orthodox, Reform, Conservative and Reconstructionist.

 

REL/SOCI 322. Sociology of Religion. 3 credits.
A sociological analysis of religion; how it influences and is influenced by social existence. See cross listing in Department of Sociology and Anthropology.

 

REL 325. Catholicism in the Modern World. 3 credits.
Study of the variety of responses by contemporary Catholic theologians and philosophers to key elements in Christian doctrine and practice. Topics include Vatican II; scripture, tradition and modern scholarship; Jesus and Christology; contemporary Catholic spirituality; moral issues in the church; and ecumenism.

 

REL 330. African and African-American Religion. 3 credits.
An examination of the character and nature of religious traditions and liturgical practices of African and African-American communities through history.

 

REL 342. Quests for the Historical Jesus. 3 credits.
This course examines the various quests for the historical Jesus prominent in Biblical scholarship since the Enlightenment, with particular attention to the current debate.

 

REL 344. Christianity in the Roman Empire. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
This course examines the rise of Christianity in the social and religious context of the pagan Roman Empire. It focuses on crucial struggles and conflicts in the volatile period from Jesus to the fourth century A.D.

 

REL 360. History of Western Religious Thought. 3 credits.
A survey of the development of western religious thought from the classical period through the modern period. The primary emphasis will be on the person, ideas, beliefs and critical turning points in the development of Christianity and Judaism, with some reference to Islam and to contemporary religious developments.

 

REL 370. Mysticism. 3 credits.
An examination of the nature of mysticism and its forms of practice in selected religious communities through the world.

 

REL/PHIL 375. The 19th Century: Age of Ideology. 3 credits.
A study of selected 19th-century philosophers and theologians with special attention to rationalism, romanticism and idealism. Views of Hegel, Schleiermacher, Ritschl, Marx and others are considered.

 

REL 380. Contemporary Theologies. 3 credits.
A survey of one or more of the following contemporary theological movements: continental, North American, African and South American, including Roman Catholic, Orthodox and Protestant approaches and covering themes such as the conflict between history and faith, Christology, fundamentalism and liberalism and the emergence of liberation, feminist, black, neo-conservative, secular, pluralist and ecological theologies.

 

REL/PHIL 385. Buddhist Thought. 3 credits.
Buddhist thought from its origins to the contemporary world in South Asia and East Asia. Emphasis on the understanding of the human condition; analysis of the mind and nature of the cosmos; and the expression of Buddhist thought in the fine arts and in social activism.

 

REL 450. Religion and Society. 3 credits.
A survey and/or selection of major western approaches to issues of religion and society, including but not limited to traditional understanding of church and state issues. Significant figures, texts and methodologies will be critically examined. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major.

 

REL 460. Biblical Texts in Context. 3 credits.
An in-depth examination of the literary, theological and historical dimensions of selected biblical texts. Texts will be studied in their ancient contexts, with a focus on ancient literary patterns and writing strategies. Students will apply critical methods used in the academic study of the Bible in their analyses. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major. Prerequisite: REL 201, REL 202 or permission of the instructor.

 

REL 475. Inter-Religious Dialogue. 3 credits.
Dialogue is, today, the most important response of the world's religions to the diversity of world religions. It is a vehicle for mutual understanding, mutual challenge and joint response to contemporary problems. Students will study the theory and practice of dialogue and then engage in dialogue. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major. Prerequisite: Familiarity with two world religions or permission of the instructor.

 

REL 490. Special Studies in Religion. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Designed to give capable students an opportunity to complete independent study in religion under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of the department head.

 

REL 499. Honors. 6 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Year course.

 

Russian

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures

RUS 101-102. Elementary Russian (4, 1). 4 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring.
The fundamentals of Russian through listening, speaking, reading and writing. Practice in pronunciation and development of comprehension. One hour's work a week in the language laboratory.

 

RUS 111-212. Intensive Russian (6, 1). 6 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring.
The fundamentals of Russian through listening, speaking, reading and writing. The first semester is the equivalent of RUS 101-102 and the second of RUS 231-232.

 

RUS 231-232. Intermediate Russian. 3 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring.
A thorough review of grammar, vocabulary building, conversation, composition and reading. Prerequisite: One year of college Russian or equivalent.

 

RUS 265-266. Russian Literature in Translation. 3 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring.
First semester: Russian literature to 1880; second semester: 1880 to the present. All lectures and readings are in English.

 

RUS 300. Russian Conversation and Composition. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Intensive training in the use and comprehension of modern, everyday Russian with emphasis on conversation and composition to give students confidence in expressing themselves in idiomatic Russian. Instruction is in Russian. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major. Prerequisite: RUS 232 or equivalent.

 

RUS 308. Introduction to Russian Civilization. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
A study of Russian life and culture and the outstanding contributions of Russian-speaking peoples. Instruction is in Russian. Prerequisite: RUS 300.

 

RUS 315. Russian Phonetics. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Intensive drill in Russian sounds and intonation patterns. Continued emphasis on conversation. Instruction is in Russian. Prerequisite: RUS 232 or equivalent.

 

RUS 320. Advanced Russian Grammar. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Advanced course in morphology and syntax with extensive practice in composition. Instruction is in Russian. Prerequisite: RUS 300 or equivalent.

 

RUS 400. Advanced Conversation. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Discussions deal with topics of current interest. Instruction is in Russian. Prerequisite: RUS 300 or equivalent.

 

RUS 405. Russian Literature of the 19th Century. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
Readings and analyses of poetry, prose and drama by such writers as Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky and Chekhov. Instruction is in Russian. Prerequisite: Three years of college Russian or equivalent.

 

RUS 426. Russian Literature of the 20th Century. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
A study of the works of major Russian writers of the 20th century. Instruction is in Russian. Prerequisite: Three years of college Russian or equivalent.

 

RUS/ENG 438. Studies in Russian Literature. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.
A study of selected works of Russian literature. Instruction is in English. May be repeated for credit when course content changes.

 

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