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Hebrew

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures

HEBR/REL 131-132. Elementary Biblical Hebrew. 4 credits each semester. 

An introductory course for students who intend to acquire the ability to read the Massoretic text of the Bible. Systematic study of the fundamentals of grammar, with emphasis on reading, pronunciation and translation.

 

HEBR/REL 231-232. Intermediate Biblical Hebrew. 3 credits each semester. 

An intensive reading course. Selections from the Massoretic text of the Bible. An introduction to the critical apparatus used within the Massoretic text as well as the variant reading apparatus printed in the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia. Prerequisite: One year of college biblical Hebrew or equivalent.

History

Department of History

GHIST 101. Global Culture to 1650. 3 credits. 

A survey of important historical developments from prehistoric times to the mid-17th century. Emphasis is given to the rise and decline of great global civilizations and their lasting contributions to humanity.

 

GHIST 102. Global Culture Since 1650. 3 credits.

A survey of important historical developments from the mid-17th century to the present. Emphasis is given to the growth of nationalism, the development of colonialism and to global events, problems and conflicts of the present century.

 

GHIST 150. Critical Issues in Recent Global History. 3 credits.

This course examines issues in recent history as a means to introduce, develop and enhance critical thinking skills and to supplement writing, oral communication, library and computing skills objectives for the General Education Cluster One. A seminar format emphasizes the development and articulation of well reasoned arguments in organized and grammatically acceptable prose.

 

HIST 201. Europe to 1789. 3 credits.

An examination of Europe from 1000 to 1789 with emphasis on the formation of indigenous European institutions through the rise of national monarchies, the Renaissance, Reformation, age of exploration, Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment. Emphasis is given to the intellectual developments of Europe that created a dynamic modern civilization.

 

HIST 202. Europe 1789 to the Present. 3 credits.

An examination of Europe from 1789 to the present with emphasis upon the democratic and industrial revolutions, the rise of nation states, building of global empires, World War I, the Russian Revolution, totalitarianism, World War II, decolonization, the Cold War and European integration.

 

GHIST 225. U. S. History. 4 credits.

A survey of U.S. history from the colonial period to the present, emphasizing the development of American civic life, the involvement of the U.S. in world affairs and the cultural richness of the American people. This course stresses the analysis and interpretation of primary sources.

 

HIST 263. Africa. 3 credits.

Emphasis is placed on the social and cultural aspects, as well as the emerging role the continent plays in contemporary world history.

 

HIST 267. Latin America. 3 credits.

A survey of the history of Latin America examining the pre-Columbian Indian civilizations, the Spanish and Portuguese conquests, the colonial era and its impact, the wars of independence and selected case studies of the early national period.

 

HIST 268. Contemporary Latin America. 3 credits.

A survey of the historical development of Latin America during the 20th century with emphasis on selected nations which have played a significant role in Latin American affairs.

 

HIST 270. Modern Middle East. 3 credits.

A survey of the political evolution of the modern Middle East. Emphasis is placed on the impact of Western imperialism, problems of Arab nationalism, origins of the Arab-Israeli conflict and involvement of Russia and the United States in the Middle East today.

 

HIST 273. Asia to 1600. 3 credits.

A broad survey of Eastern civilizations from their beginnings to about 1600, with emphasis on their distinctive aesthetic and intellectual traditions as well as the development of their political, social and economic institutions.

 

HIST 274. Modern Asia. 3 credits.

A historical survey of East, South and Southeast Asia with emphasis on the impact of the West on the traditional societies and governments of the Eastern World, as well as nationalism, colonialism, wars, revolutions and industrialization in Asia in modern times.

 

HIST 300. U.S. Military History. 3 credits.

A survey of the evolution of the American way of war from the Colonial era to the post-Cold War period emphasizing the development of military and naval institutions, U.S. strategic doctrine and the social legacies of the U.S. military establishment.

 

HIST 301. European Military History. 3 credits.

A survey of European military history (including Russia/Soviet Union) from the Hellenistic period through the 1982 Falklands-Malvinas War. The evolution of strategic doctrine and military institutions, their effect upon European society and their role in European imperialism will be emphasized.

 

HIST/ITAL 308. Contemporary Italian Civilization. 3 credits.

A study of Italian society, economics, politics and the arts from 1814 to the present. Instruction in English. (Research papers for Italian majors/minors in the language.)

 

HIST 310. American Business History. 3 credits.

A survey of the role of business in the United States from the Colonial period to the present, with emphasis on the entrepreneurial spirit, business developments and innovations and the relationship between the federal government and commerce.

 

HIST 315. History of Sport in America. 3 credits.

An interpretive survey that examines the social and cultural history of America from the late 19th century to the present through sports.

 

HIST 320. Women in U.S. History. 3 credits.

A survey of the role of women in the United States from the Colonial period to the present. Attention is given to contributions of the ordinary women, the Women's Rights movements, the impact of women on reform and political movements and the changing status of women in society.

 

HIST 321. European Women's History. 3 credits.

A survey of the gendered history of European women from the Classical to the Modern Era. Attention will focus on women in England, France, Germany and Central Europe, but material will also be presented on women of the Baltic, Mediterranean and Slavic regions.

 

HIST 322. The New South. 3 credits.

An examination of major problems in the history of the American South after Reconstruction, beginning with debates over the nature of the "New South" itself. The course will emphasize cultural and social history; it also explores political and economic developments. Prerequisite: GHIST 225.

 

HIST 323. The Old South. 3 credits.

Economic, cultural and social history of the antebellum South; 1790-1860. The region's political history will serve as a supporting part of the course.

 

HIST 325. Technology and Western Society. 3 credits.

A survey of the interaction between technology and Western society since the Middle Ages. Topics include Medieval, Renaissance, Enlightenment, 19th-century British and continental technologies, intercultural technology transfer, the American mass production ethos, technology within modern totalitarian and national security states and technological futurism. No technical knowledge assumed.

 

HIST 326. The Automobile in Twentieth Century America. 3 credits.

This course uses the automobile as a window into 20th century American life. It examines the influence of automobility on patterns of work and leisure; on struggles over gender, race, and ethnicity; on individualism, consumerism, and government regulation. It also surveys mass automobility's effects on our physical and natural environments and looks at future prospects of automobility in the information age.

 

HIST 327. Technology in America. 3 credits.

An historical survey of the complex and changing relationship between technology and American society from Native American canoes to the Internet. Attention is given to technology's role in relations of power, in the home, on the farm, in the workplace and on the battlefield.

 

HIST 328. History of Science, 1543-1859. 3 credits.

An intellectual and social survey of science from Copernicus' de Revolutionibus to Darwin's The Origin of Species. Topics include Renaissance natural philosophy, the Scientific Revolution, Enlightenment science and the birth of geology and biology.

 

HIST 329. History of Science Since 1859. 3 credits.

A survey of pure and applied science since the publication of Darwin's The Origin of Species. Topics include the development of relativity and quantum theory; Darwinism and the eugenics movement; rocketry, radar, and the Manhattan Project; and the revolutions in biochemistry, genetics, materials science, and information technology.

 

HIST 330. U.S. Diplomatic History. 3 credits.

A survey of major themes, events and forces shaping the development of American foreign relations throughout our history. Key documents such as the Monroe Doctrine will be examined, as will significant issues including manifest destiny, the United States as a world power, origins of Cold War and Detente.

 

HIST/ANTH 331. Historical Archaeology. 3 credits.

The course introduces students to the purposes, subject matter, methodology and historical background of the discipline of historical archaeology. Building on research issues and methodologies of anthropological archaeology and history, the multidisciplinary aspects of this field are introduced through field trips, projects, guest lectures, readings and classroom presentations. Prerequisite: ANTH 197 or HIST equivalent.

 

HIST 337. Practicum: Selected Topics in Local and Regional History. 3 credits.

Selected historical topics relating to the Shenandoah Valley and surrounding region are studied in depth. Students will undertake primary research and collaborate on final project. See the e-campus for current classes. The course may be repeated when content changes. Prerequisite: GHIST 225.

 

HIST 339. Selected Themes in U.S. History. 3 credits.

Selected themes are studied in depth. See e-campus for current classes. Course may be repeated when content changes.

 

HIST 340. Internship in History. 3 credits.

Provides students with practical experience in using historical skills in a public or private agency. Periodic student reports and seminars required. This course may be repeated with permission of department head. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, HIST 395 and permission of the department head.

 

HIST 341. Selected Themes in World History. 3 credits.

Selected themes are studied in depth. See e-campus for current classes. Course may be repeated when content changes.

 

HIST 350. Virginia. 3 credits.

An interpretive survey of the history of Virginia from its Colonial beginnings to the present time.

 

HIST 353. Trans-Mississippi West. 3 credits.

A study of the United States west of the Mississippi from the early Spanish exploration and settlement through the progressive waves of explorers, trappers, miners, soldiers and farmers as they encountered the western environment, the Indians and one another.

 

HIST 355. Afro-American History to 1865. 3 credits.

A survey of the experience and changing status of African-Americans in the United States from 1619 through the Civil War, with attention to the West African background, cultural developments, social and political movements, slavery and the slave trade, dual-consciousness and emancipation.

 

HIST 356. Afro-American History Since 1865. 3 credits.

A survey of the experience and changing status of African-Americans in the United States from Reconstruction to the present, emphasizing the strengthening of social and cultural institutions; Afro-American leadership; the impact of segregation; the Great Migration; labor, protest and cultural movements; pan-Africanism; the Civil Rights Movement; and contemporary issues.

 

HIST 360. Research Apprenticeship in History. 3 credits.

Provides students with advanced research and writing opportunities. Student learning contract must be approved before a student can enroll. Periodic student reports and seminars required. Open to history majors only. Prerequisites: HIST 395.

 

HIST 361. Class and Ethnicity in Africa. 3 credits.

An examination of the development of class and ethnicity in African societies. Attention is given to the pre-colonial and colonial periods, as well as to the effects of imperialism, development strategies and structural adjustment policies on class and ethnic relations in contemporary Africa.

 

HIST 371. India. 3 credits.

A survey of India from the earliest times to the attainment of national independence following World War II. Particular attention is given to traditional Indian civilization, its impact on India's Asian neighbors, its response to the intrusion of Western power, the British in India and the struggle for independence.

 

HIST 375. History of Modern Southeast Asia. 3 credits.

A survey of Southeast Asian history from the 16th century to the present. Particular attention is given to European and American colonization of the region, the impact of the Japanese occupation, and the achievement of independence.

 

HIST 377. History of Korea. 3 credits.

A survey of Korean history from its earliest times to the present day. It is designed to develop an understanding in Korea, its historical tradition and the place of Korea in the larger narrative of East Asia and world history.

 

HIST 379. Family and Gender in East Asia. 3 credits.

This is a survey focusing on the ways families have been defined and gender roles assigned in China, Korea, Japan in premodern and modern times. Attention will be given to how the changing nature of family and gender have helped shape the historical evolution of these societies.

 

HIST 383. Early England. 3 credits.

A survey of English history from the earliest times to the late 17th century. Particular attention is given to the rise of Parliament and the growth of limited monarchy.

 

HIST 384. England and the Empire-Commonwealth. 3 credits.

A survey of English history from the late 17th century to the present. Particular attention is given to the growth of British democracy, the industrial revolution and the rise and fall of the British Empire.

 

HIST 385. Russia to 1855. 3 credits.

A survey of Russian history from the origins of the Russian state down through the reign of Nicholas I. Attention is given to such topics as the Kievan state, the Muscovite state, the rise of Imperial Russia and the emergence of Russia as a Western European power.

 

HIST 386. Russia Since 1855. 3 credits.

A survey of Russian history from the reign of Alexander II to the present. Attention is given to such topics as the decline of Imperial Russia, the rise of the revolutionary movement, the emergence and consolidation of the Soviet state, and contemporary Russia.

 

HIST 387. Germany to 1871. 3 credits.

A survey of the German-speaking lands of Central Europe from the end of the Thirty Years War to the creation of the Second Reich. Emphasis is given to political, diplomatic and military affairs, although social, economic and cultural developments are included.

 

HIST 388. Germany Since 1871. 3 credits.

A survey of German history during the Second Reich, World War I, the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich and the post-World War II periods of Cold War and Detente. Emphasis is given to political, diplomatic and military affair, although social, economic and cultural developments are included.

 

HIST 389. France to 1789. 3 credits.

A survey of French history from the Capetians to the end of the old Regime, 987-1789. Particular attention is given to France's medieval heritage; the impact of the Renaissance; the Protestant revolt; the policies of Richelieu, Colbert and Louis XIV; and the background of the French Revolution.

 

HIST 390. France Since 1789. 3 credits.

A study of the social and political events which determined the course of French history from the Revolution through the Fifth Republic. Particular attention is given to the social, economic and cultural currents which have contributed to the making of contemporary France.

 

HIST 391. Travel Studies Seminar. 3 credits.

Designed to encourage the student to augment the regular academic program through independent investigation including organized travel-study. Prearrangements must be made with a designated faculty member who will direct the study with preparatory instructions and final requirements. Prerequisite: Permission of the department head.

 

HIST 395. History Seminar. 3 credits.

A seminar to introduce history as an academic discipline and acquaint the student with the work of major historians and problems of historical interpretation. Students will be required to complete assignments designed to develop basic skills in historical research and writing. Open to all students, but required of history majors. Fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major.

 

HIST/ARTH 396. Introduction to Public History. 3 credits.

An introduction to the varied and interdisciplinary "field" of Public History-such as community/local history, historic preservation, archives, historical archaeology, museum studies, business and policy history, documentary editing and publishing, and documentary films-through readings, class discussions, occasional guest speakers and occasional field trips.

 

HIST 399. Special Studies in History. 3 credits.

Designed to give capable students in history an opportunity to complete independent study under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of the department head.

 

HIST 402. Workshop in Colonial American Life. 3 credits.

A comparative study of life in 18th-century Virginia and Massachusetts. Colonial Massachusetts is studied through the use of printed materials, films and lectures. Published sources, lectures and a four-day study visit to Colonial Williamsburg are used for the study of Virginia. Supplemental fee required. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 403. Workshop in Civil War Virginia. 3 credits.

This workshop examines the impact of the Civil War upon Virginia and her citizens. It explores the secession crisis, the revolution in firepower that forced changes in battlefield tactics and war aims, and the development of "hard war." A four-day battlefield tour will reinforce ideas discussed in the classroom. Supplemental fee required. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 411. Colonial America. 3 credits.

An interpretive survey of England's mainland colonies from 1558-1776. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 413. The Anglo-American Constitutional Tradition, 1603-1791. 3 credits.

Surveys Anglo-American political and constitutional traditions. Emphasizes the evolution of 17th and 18th century British constitutionalism, its transferal to the British North American colonies and the development of the first national and state constitutions in the United States. Prerequisite: GHIST 225, HIST 395.

 

HIST 420. U.S. History, 1763-1800. 3 credits.

An interpretive study of the political, economic, social and cultural history of the United States from the French and Indian War through the Federalist period. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 422. U.S. History, 1789-1848. 3 credits.

An interpretive study of the political, economic, social, intellectual and cultural history of the United States from the ratification of the Constitution through the Mexican-American War. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 425. Civil War and Reconstruction. 3 credits.

A study of the background, development, personalities and aftermath of the Civil War. Special attention is given to the coming of the war and different explanations of its causes and to the policies and significance of Reconstruction, with varying interpretations thereof. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 428. American Workers in the Industrial Age, 1877-1948. 3 credits.

This seminar examines what contemporaries called the Labor Problem, from the strikes of 1877 to the accord between GM and the UAW in 1948. It explores the impact of industrialization, race and gender, consumerism, the New Deal and two world wars on the lives of American workers and their unions.

 

HIST 430. The Gilded Age: U.S. History, 1877-1901. 3 credits.

An interpretive study of the United States from the conclusion of the Civil War until the assassination of William McKinley, with special emphasis on industrialization, urbanization, western and overseas expansion, early reform movements and politics. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 431. Reform, World War and Prosperity: U.S. History, 1901-1929. 3 credits.

An interpretive study of U.S. history from the rise of Theodore Roosevelt through the 1920s. Emphasis is placed on the reform movements of the period and the problems and issues generated by the nation's emergence as a world power and an industrial, urban society. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 432. Depression, War and Cold War: U.S. History, 1929-1961. 3 credits.

An interpretive study of U.S. history from the onset of the Great Depression in 1929 through the inauguration of John Kennedy in 1961. Emphasis is given to the New Deal, World War II and the early years of the Cold War. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 433. Reform, Upheaval and Reaction: U.S. History Since 1961. 3 credits.

An interpretive study of U.S. history from the inauguration of John Kennedy in 1961 through the present. Emphasis is given to the Kennedy-Johnson administrations, Vietnam, the counterculture and student movement, Watergate and the Reagan years. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 439. Selected Topics in American History. 3 credits.

Selected topics are studied in depth. See e-campus for current topic. Course may be repeated for credit when content changes. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 445. Latin America and the United States. 3 credits.

An examination of the diplomatic relations between Latin America and the United States from the era of the Latin American revolutions for independence to the present. Emphasis is placed on the Monroe Doctrine and its extensions, as well as the development of the Pan-American system. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 446. Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. 3 credits.

A study of the nations of the area with special attention given to Mexico, Panama and Cuba. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 447. South America. 3 credits.

Historic development of the continent with special attention to selected nations since the early national period of the 19th century. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 450. Studies in Military History. 3 credits.

A seminar addressing topics in U.S. or European military and naval history such as military operations, strategic theory, institutional evolution, the nature of modern war, technology and the warrior ethos, military-industrial-academic relations and military ethics and the laws of war. Prerequisite: HIST 300 or HIST 301 depending on seminar topic offered.

 

HIST 453. Patterns of World History. 3 credits.

This course introduces students to the literature, concepts, themes and methodology of world history, a subfield of history that seeks to compare experiences across regional, area, cultural and temporal boundaries, to look at cross-cultural interactions and to examine large-scale patterns that have shaped history on a global scale. Prerequisites: GHIST 101, GHIST 102 and HIST 395.

 

HIST 455. World Political and Social Thought to Early Modern Times. 3 credits.

A study of the most significant political and social ideas from around the world. Emphasis will be both on the classics and popular ideas from Western Asia, China, Greece, India, Rome, Japan and the developing states of Europe from ancient times through the 18th century. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 456. The Global Economy and Nationalism. 3 credits.

An examination of the global economy's growth since the 14th century. The course investigates the emergence of capitalism, its relationship to modern nationalism, and the role that the concepts of development has played in the contemporary organization of nation-states from the perspective of world systems/dependency theory approaches. Prerequisites: GHIST 102 and HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 460. Modern Japan. 3 credits.

The development of Japan from around the mid-19th century to the present. Attention is given to the collapse of isolation, the end of the Shogunate, the creation of a modern state, the years of party government, the rise of militarism, the Pacific war, the occupation and the new Japan. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 461. Marxism-Leninism in Global Affairs. 3 credits.

A study of the most significant ideas concerning politics, society, economics and philosophy, which shaped Communism and Marxist varieties of Socialism. Prerequisite: HIST 395 or permission of instructor.

 

HIST 462. The Rise and Fall of Nazi Germany, 1918-1945. 3 credits.

An advanced study of the period of Nazi domination in Germany covering the Weimar Republic, the rise of the NSDAP, the Third Reich and World War II. The nature of totalitarianism, the character of Adolph Hitler and the general Weltanschauung of Germany under the Third Reich are emphasized. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 463. Tudor-Stuart England. 3 credits.

A study of the economic, intellectual, political and religious development of the English people from 1485 to 1714, with special attention to the constitutional struggles of the 17th century. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 464. Renaissance and Reformation. 3 credits.

A study of High Medieval civilization as an introduction to the history of Modern Europe. Attention is given to the Italian and Northern Renaissance, fragmentation of Western christendom, intellectual impact of Luther and Calvin on Western thought and structure of Tudor despotism in England. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 465. 20th-Century Britain. 3 credits.

An examination of the major themes of British history in the 20th century, with attention to political, social, economic, diplomatic and imperial topics from the pre-World War I through post-World War II decades. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 466. The Family, 1400-1800. 3 credits.

An examination of the bibliography, methods and substance of family history in Europe and America. Emphasis will be on sources, structure, patterns of change and continuity and stages of family life to the Industrial Revolution. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 469. The History of Flight: The Jet and Rocket Era. 3 credits.

A survey of the history of aviation in the era of jet and manned space flight. This course examines the origins and development of jet flight, considers its impact on military and commercial aviation and traces the course of manned space flight from its beginning to the present. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 470. Modern Africa. 3 credits.

Africa in the 20th century, with special emphasis on Senegal, Ivory Coast, Gold Coast (Ghana), Nigeria and Zaire. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 472. Greece and Rome. 3 credits.

Advanced study of Greek and Roman history from the Minoans to the fall of the Roman Empire. Emphasis is given to political, military, social and cultural development of each civilization. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 473. The Islamic World. 3 credits.

The rise of Islam and spread of the Ottoman Empire. A survey of the Middle East from the pre-Islamic period to World War I. This course provides a background for understanding the present situation in the Middle East. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 474. The Byzantine Empire. 3 credits.

A survey of the political, economic, military and religious history of the Byzantine Empire, 330-1453. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 475. Soviet Russia. 3 credits.

A study of Soviet Russia from the 1917 Revolution to the present. Readings and discussion will emphasize significant political, economic, social and cultural developments. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 476. Ancient History. 3 credits.

A survey of the rise and fall of ancient civilizations of the Near East and Mediterranean area. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 477. Medieval Europe. 3 credits.

Attention is focused on Europe in the Middle Ages, with a concentration on social and intellectual aspects and the development of parliamentary institutions. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 478. Eastern Europe. 3 credits.

A study of the lands between Germany and Russia, from the Baltic to the Balkans. Emphasis is on the Hapsburg Empire and its successor states, the origins of the World Wars, the post-World War II communist governments and the cultural and intellectual contributions of the Eastern European people. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 480. Modern China. 3 credits.

China since 1840, with special emphasis on China's response to the West, the disintegration of imperial China, the abortive experiments in republicanism, the origin and nature of Chinese Communism. China under Mao and post-Mao developments. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 481. Early Modern Europe: The New Worlds of Exploration and Science. 3 credits.

A study of the major changes in world view brought on by exploration and science in the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries in Europe. Attention is given to the causes, individuals and technology involved in each movement. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 483. Baroque and Revolutionary Europe, 1648-1815. 3 credits.

A study of the unfolding of European civilization from the Baroque through the Napoleonic era. Attention is given to the Old Regime and its institutions, the causes of popular revolts, the Enlightenment, the beginnings of industrialism and urbanism and the impact of the French Revolution on Europe. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 484. 19th-Century European Civilization, 1815-1914. 3 credits.

An interpretive study of European history from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of World War I. Particular attention is given to the intellectual climate of the period, with emphasis on liberalism, nationalism, socialism and nihilism. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 485. The Arab Middle East, 1945 to Present. 3 credits.

A survey of the special problems which have beset the Arab Middle East since World War II. Special emphasis will be given to Palestinian Nationalism and the PLO, the origins of civil conflict in Lebanon, Iraqi and Syrian Baathism and the revival of Islamic fundamentalism in the area. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 486. Europe Since 1914. 3 credits.

An interpretive study of European history from World War I to the Cold War, with special emphasis on the revolutions of 1917-19, the rise of totalitarianism, the origins of the Second World War and the continuing crisis of values. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 487. World War II. 3 credits.

An examination of the origins, conduct and immediate aftermath of World War II in Europe and Asia. Attention is given to Japan's Pacific War, Hitler's war in Europe and the ultimate victory of the Allies. The major military campaigns are discussed as are collaborations, resistance, and the War Crimes Trials. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 488. The Holocaust in Global Context. 3 credits.

Introduces students to the most significant accomplishments and debates of recent Holocaust scholarship, emphasizing how historical memory of the Holocaust has been created and has evolved over time. Analyzes the historical causes and development of the Holocaust, as well as its cultural, political, and scholarly resonance in the post-1945 world. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 489. Selected Topics in World History. 3 credits.

Selected topics are studied in depth. See e-campus for current topic. Course may be repeated for credit when content changes. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 491. Editing Historical Documents. 3 credits.

A seminar in the techniques of analyzing manuscript collections in order to create an edition of historical documents. Study will address the theory and practice of historical documentary editions, including collecting, selecting, transcribing, annotating, proofing, illustrating, indexing and publishing. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST/ANTH/ARTH 492. American Material Culture. 3 credits.

A broad introduction to the multidisciplinary "field" of material culture studies through readings, written assignments, in-class exercises, and field trips. The course introduces ways of looking at and learning from objects and examines how scholars from several disciplines have used material culture in their work. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST/ARTH 493. Historic Preservation. 3 credits.

An introduction to the philosophy and techniques of historic preservation, guidelines for restoration, state and National Register forms and procedures, historic architecture, structural analysis, restoration techniques as well as the business aspects of historic preservation projects. Field trips are a major component of the course. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST/ARTH 494. Introduction to Museum Work. 3 credits.

The practice and philosophy of museum work, including the areas of design, conservation, registration, education and administration. Subject is taught from the perspective of the museum profession and is applicable to diverse disciplines and types of collections. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for non-history majors.

 

HIST 497. Genealogical Research and Family History. 3 credits.

Focus is on the methodology associated with genealogical research, the evaluation of sources, methods of documentation, the availability of online resources, and the analysis of evidence. The course will require that those enrolled utilize local and state repositories and work with local research topics as well as with personal data. Personal genealogical information should be secured at home before the start of the semester.

 

HIST 498. Marshall Scholars Seminar. 3 credits.

A research intensive seminar based on the manuscript collections and other primary sources of the Marshall Library. Students may choose any subject involving 20th century diplomatic and military history and political affairs from 1900 to 1960 - the approximate dates of George C. Marshall's public service. Prerequisites: HIST 395 and acceptance into the course prior to the beginning of the semester in which this course is taken.

 

HIST 499. Honors. 6 credits.

Year course. Prerequisite: HIST 395.

 

Human Resource Development

School of Education

HRD 240. Introduction of Human Resource Development. 3 credits.

An introduction to the role and scope of human resource development with particular emphasis on required competencies for HRD professionals. Critical moral and ethical issues are introduced.

 

HRD 245. Leadership in Organizational Settings. 3 credits.

An examination of the principles of leadership and their application to group settings. Emphasis will be placed on the critical appraisal of the facets of leadership through the use of cases and readings.

 

HRD 370. Performance and Task Analysis in Human Resource Development. 3 credits.

This course is designed to provide the basic skill level for students in the area of occupational analysis and subsequent assessment. Particular emphasis is placed on actual analysis and assessment situations with application to program and curricular design.

 

HRD 400. Occupational Internship. 3 credits.

A structured occupational internship experience designed to provide students with the opportunity to observe within an actual occupational setting the role and scope of human resource development efforts. Minimum 400-hour experience approved by the program coordinator. Credit may not be earned for both HRD 400 and HRD 401.

 

HRD 475. Seminar in Leadership. 3 credits.

Designed to provide senior-level students with the opportunity to face some of the dilemmas of leadership. Students will be encouraged to critically examine leaders and organizations to draw from real events the ambiguities of leadership. Course will involve extensive reading, case work and a range of guest speakers. Prerequisite: HRD 245.

 

HRD 480. Learning in Adulthood. 3 credits.

A study of the learning processes of the adult learner with an emphasis on adaptations of the instructional process to accommodate the differences inherent in the adult learning environment. Practical applications to actual adult learning situations are included.

 

HRD 485. Development of Materials and Programs. 3 credits.

This course is designed to provide the basic skills necessary to design and develop performance-based training programs and courses. Emphasis will be placed on the actual design and development of training materials.

 

HRD 490. Special Study in Human Resource Development. 1-3 credits.

Designed to provide in-depth and up-to-date exposure to the topics/issues pertinent to Human Resource Development and allows students to explore topics of special interest in human resource development. Prerequisite: HRD 240 or permission of the instructor.

Health and Human Services

Institute for Innovation in Health and Human Services

HHS 220. Adult Health and Development Program. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

In this academic course and out reach program to adults age 55+ in the surrounding community, JMU students are trained to work 1:1 with the older adults, to apply aging and intergenerational theory and to critically analyze the outcomes from their interactions.

 

HHS 320. Adult Health and Development Program-Leadership. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Both an academic course and an outreach program to adults age 55+ in the surrounding community, this course offers JMU students who have previously participated in the program the opportunity to become Senior Staff who provide program leadership, oversight and implementation to the program. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and completion of one semester of AHDP.

 

HHS 490. Special Topics in Health and Human Services. 0-4 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course involves topics of special interest in the area of health and human services but is open to all students. The focus of specific courses is identified for specific offerings. Courses are offered based on faculty an student interests.

Health

Department of Health Sciences

GHTH 100. Personal Wellness. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Emphasizes lifestyle behaviors contributing to health promotion and disease prevention. General areas affecting health status are identified and suggestions made as to how health-related behaviors, self-care and individual decisions contribute to wellness and influence dimensions of health. A one-hour weekly individual physical wellness lab is included.

 

HTH 151. Foundations of the Health Sciences. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Review of the basic competencies and foundations of the health sciences including academic planning, professionalism, writing and presentation skills, information literacy, foundational principles and the roles and responsibilities of selected health science fields. This is intended to be the first course that a student takes in the health sciences major.

 

HTH 204. Emergency Health Care (2, 2). 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A survey of various dimensions of the legal aspects of emergency care, cardiorespiratory emergencies, hemorrhage control, wounds, shock, heat injuries and other health emergencies. Selected American Red Cross and American Heart Association certifications available. The American Red Cross registration fees apply.

 

HTH 206. Advanced Athletic Training. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course involves advanced study of injuries associated with physically active individuals including injury mechanisms, signs and symptoms and treatments. Other topics include relationships athletic trainers build with other health care professionals; environmental issues related to physical activity; and special needs of various populations. Prerequisites: BIO 290 and HTH 205. Formerly HTH 303.

 

HTH 252. Sexually Related Diseases. 1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

Sexually transmitted diseases and other sexual systems problems (breast and testicular cancer), nonvenereal diseases, chromosomal anomalies, sexual disorders of the genitalia and urinary system problems.

 

HTH 270. Personal Health Promotion. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A survey of principles for the promotion of optimum individual, family and community health through intelligent self-direction of health behavior. Topics include the physical, mental and social dimension of health economics; disease control; human sexuality; chemical abuse; injury control; and nutrition.

 

HTH 278. Alcohol: Use and Abuse. 1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

Survey of the drug alcohol. Topics include pharmacological effects, patterns of use, potential for abuse, treatment programs and prevention of alcohol abuse and alcoholism.

 

HTH 300. Medical Terminology. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Study of terms that relate to body systems, anatomical structures, medical processes and procedures and a variety of diseases disorders that afflict human organisms. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

 

HTH 302. The Language of Medicine. 1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

This course introduces the student to the vocabulary of medicine through learning the prefixes, roots and suffixes used to construct medical terms.

 

HTH 308. Therapeutic Assessment. 3 credits. Offered spring.

The purpose of this course is to present an overview of established and current knowledge in the major content areas in therapeutic assessment by examining the impact of work and the working environment on human body systems as they relate to health and wellness. Prerequisite: BIO 290.

 

HTH 310. Medical Interviewing and Physical Examination I. 1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

This is the first in a four-course series that presents fundamental concepts in the physician assistant/patient relationship, skills needed to conduct complete medical histories and physical examinations of patients of all ages, systematic approaches to clinical problem solving and methodologies commonly used to communicate medical information. Prerequisite: Admission to Physician Assistant concentration or permission of program director.

 

HTH 311. Medical Interviewing and Physical Examination II. 1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

This is the second in a four-course series that presents fundamental concepts in the physician assistant/patient relationship, skills needed to conduct complete medical histories and physical examinations of patients of all ages, systematic approaches to clinical problem solving and methodologies commonly used to communicate medical information. Prerequisite: Admission to the Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 312/ KIN 312. The Profession of Teaching Health & Physical Education. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Introductory study of the roles of the teacher and the learner, and the pedagogical content knowledge of health and physical education. An in-depth examination of the unique position and qualifications of the specialist in physical education and health. Systematic observations will occur. Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education.

 

HTH 313. Preventive Medicine. 1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

The course presents strategies that physician assistants employ in promoting health and well being among the people they serve. It also examines public health strategies focused on early discovery of disease, prevention of disease and stopping the spread of disease. Prerequisite: Admission to the Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 317. Clinical Laboratory Medicine. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course presents the clinical laboratory tests used to detect and monitor common diseases and disorders. It focuses on selecting and interpreting the appropriate tests for each body system as well as performing selected tests. Prerequisite: Admission to the Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 320. Statistical Methods for Health Science Research. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course reviews statistical concepts and techniques with special reference to their relation to health science applications and issues. It also reinforces the logical processes associated with statistical decision making, again with particular reference to health and medical research methods. Prerequisites: MATH 220 and HTH 354.

 

HTH 330. Theories and Principles in Occupational Therapy. 2 credits. Offered summer.

This course introduces the student to the history, philosophy and development of the profession of occupational therapy. A variety of theoretical approaches will be examined and applied to the meaning and dynamics of purposeful activity to enhance occupational performance. Use of professional uniform terminology will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Admission into Occupational Therapy concentration.

 

HTH 332. Analysis of Therapeutic Process and Interaction. 1 credit. Offered summer.

Introduction to processes of functional groups and how individuals contribute to group dynamics and effective change within groups. Components of effective individual and group interaction aimed at achieving therapeutic goals will be explored. The foundations of self awareness, therapeutic use of self, therapeutic observation and interviewing will be examined. Prerequisite: Admission into Occupational Therapy concentration.

 

HTH 336. Development, Performance and Intervention I (2, 3). 3 credits. Offered fall.

This course examines conditions impeding occupational performance from birth through adolescence. Instruction of assessment and intervention strategies to be used to address functional deficits will be studied. An analysis of theory, treatment planning, uniform terminology, documentation and partnerships with other professionals and an appreciation of multicultural factors will be provided. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of previous concentration course work.

 

HTH 338. Analysis and Application of Therapeutic Media and Technology (1, 3). 2 credits. Offered fall.

This course will provide a thorough overview of therapeutic application of craft media, adaptive equipment and advanced technology utilized in practice. Introduction in activity analysis and compensatory strategies in regard to therapeutic methods and occupational performance tasks will be examined. The relationship of activity to professional theory will be discussed. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of previous concentration course work.

 

HTH 340. Perspectives in Motor Function (1, 3). 2 credits. Offered fall.

This course will examine principles of movement, biomechanics and motor control and their relationship to occupational performance. Traditional and contemporary approaches to assessment and intervention will be explored. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of previous concentration course work.

 

HTH 342. Seminar in School Based Practice (1, 3). 2 credits. Offered fall.

This course will examine the history and roles of occupational therapy personnel in school based settings. Skills related to school based practice will be addressed. Interdisciplinary collaboration and important public policy issues will be explored. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of previous concentration course work.

 

HTH 346. Level One Fieldwork I. 1 credit. Offered fall.

This course provides a contextual setting for the application of skills and information gained from didactic course work. Participants will have the opportunity to design and implement courses of intervention under close supervision in a human services setting. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of previous concentration course work.

 

HTH 352. Environmental Health. 3 credits. Offered fall.

An investigation of environmental factors and their effects on the health of the individual, community and society.

 

HTH 354. U.S. Health Care System. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course examines the structure and organization of the health care delivery system in the United States. The components, functions, financing and resources of this system are described.

 

HTH 355. AIDS and Other Sexually Transmitted Diseases. 1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

Discussion includes theories of origins, statistics and characteristics of the causative pathogen, incubation, illness patterns, transmission, prevention and treatment of AIDS and other STDs. AIDS and other STDs in relation to prisons, children, schools, global concerns, health care systems and legal factors will be considered.

 

HTH 357. Coping With Stress. 1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

Identifying causes and personal symptoms associated with stress and individual methods of handling stress.

 

HTH 359. Leadership in Health. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course will introduce students to the concept of leadership, provide opportunities to develop leadership skills, relate leadership to ethics and personal values and assist students in creating a bridge between leadership theory and practice.

 

HTH 368. International Health and Nutrition Studies. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course involves participation with an interdisciplinary team which will travel outside of the United States to observe and experience the health care challenges in a developing nation.

 

HTH 370. Child and Adolescent Health. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course will discuss the CDC priority health risk categories and the Healthy People 2010 Objectives for the Nation as they relate to child and adolescent health. In addition, the CDC model for Coordinated School Health Programs will be explored to determine specific strategies for health improvement. Prerequisite: Restricted to PHETE or Health Sciences majors.

 

HTH 372. Human Sexuality. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An in-depth study of sexuality across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on the development of sexuality with attention given to the psychological, physiological, ethical and socio-cultural implications.

 

HTH 375. Pregnancy Control and Abortion. 1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

An in-depth study of four areas concerning the following sexual aspects of living: contraception, abortion, sterilization and fertility-enhancing methods. The biochemical, physiological, legal, cultural and ethical aspects are considered.

 

HTH 378. The Use and Effects of Drugs. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A study of the use and pharmacological properties of popular legal and illegal drugs and their effects on the health of individuals and society.

 

HTH 389. Practicum in Health Education. 1-3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Selected practicum experiences which provide students with supervised practicum experiences. Formerly HTH 389M, S.

 

HTH 390. Selected Topics in Health Science. 1-3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Study of selected topics in health science. Consult e-campus for specific topics. May be repeated for credit when course content changes.

 

HTH 403. Topics in Health Education. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An overview of selected topics required for students preparing to teach health in public schools. Selected topics include consumer health, environmental health, mental-emotional health, personal health, prevention and control of chronic diseases, aging, death and dying. Special emphasis will be on issues relevant to teaching these topics in schools. Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education.

 

HTH 408. Managing and Interpreting Health Research Information. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course will present an overview of the role of research application, interpretation and communication as related to the decision-making processes in health care fields. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of previous concentration course work.

 

HTH 410. Medical Interviewing and Physical Examination III. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This is the third in a four-course series that presents fundamental concepts in the physician assistant/patient relationship, skills needed to conduct complete medical histories and physical examinations of patients of all ages, systematic approaches to clinical problem solving and methodologies commonly used to communicate medical information. Prerequisites: Admission to Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 411. Clinical Problem Solving. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This is the fourth in a four-course series that presents fundamental concepts in the physician assistant/patient relationship, skills needed to conduct complete medical histories and physical examinations of patients of all ages, systematic approaches to clinical problem solving and methodologies commonly used to communicate medical information. Prerequisites: Admission to Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 413. Pharmacology for Physician Assistants I. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This is the first of two courses that provide the base of information necessary for clinical prescribing of medications. It includes pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacotherapeutics. Within each class of therapeutic drugs, the course examines drug actions, interactions, reactions and contraindications. The course will also include principles of prescribing and patient compliance. Prerequisites: Admission to Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 414. Pharmacology for Physician Assistants II. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This is the second of two courses that provide the base of information necessary for clinical prescribing of medications. It includes pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacotherapeutics. Within each class of therapeutic drugs, the course examines drug actions, interactions, reactions and contraindications. The course will also include principles of prescribing and patient compliance. Prerequisites: Admission to Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 417. Clinical Medicine I. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This is the first of a three-course series that examines the etiology, presentation, diagnosis and treatment of diseases and disorders common to primary care physician assistant practice. This course serves as preparation for the clinical rotations in internal medicine and family medicine. Prerequisites: Admission to Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 418. Clinical Medicine II. 5 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course provides an introductory knowledge base in pediatrics, women's medicine and behavioral medicine. It prepares students for clinical rotations in these specialties. Prerequisites: Admission to Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 419. Clinical Medicine III. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course provides an introductory knowledge base in general surgery and emergency medicine. It prepares students for clinical rotations in these specialties. Emphasis is on the primary care aspects pertinent to physician assistant practice. Prerequisites: Admission to Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 420. The Physician Assistant Profession. 1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

This course will explore the principles of the PA profession, its history and place in the spectrum of health care professions. Economic, legal and societal factors influencing the profession will be discussed. Prerequisites: Admission to Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 421. Transition to Physician Assistant Practice. 1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

This course examines issues related to the shift from the role of a PA student to that of a practicing PA. Topics include medical liability and risk management, business aspects of clinical practice, credentialing processes and career development. Prerequisites: Admission to Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 422. Advanced Clinical Skills. 1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

This course focuses on the skills needed to provide appropriate care for individuals and groups who have specific needs based on culture, lifestyle or temporary circumstance. Prerequisites: Admission to Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 423. Pediatric Clinical Rotation. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.

During this four-week clinical rotation the student gains knowledge, experience and skill in interviewing and examining children, diagnosing and treating disorders and educating and counseling children and parents through participation in these activities while under the supervision of an experienced clinician practicing pediatric medicine. The course will also include assigned readings and exercises. Prerequisites: Admission to Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 425. Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinical Rotation. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.

During this four-week clinical rotation the student gains knowledge, experience and skill in interviewing and examining women, diagnosing and treating disorders and educating and counseling women through participation in these activities while under the supervision of an experienced clinician practicing obstetric and gynecologic medicine. The course will also include assigned readings and exercises. Prerequisites: Admission to Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 427. Internal Medicine Clinical Rotation. 4 credits. Offered fall and spring.

During this eight-week clinical rotation the student gains knowledge, experience and skill in interviewing and examining children, diagnosing and treating disorders and educating and counseling patients through participation in these activities while under the supervision of an experienced clinician practicing internal medicine. The course will also include assigned readings and exercises. Prerequisites: Admission to Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 429. Family Medicine Clinical Rotation. 4 credits. Offered fall and spring.

During this eight-week clinical rotation the student gains knowledge, experience and skill in interviewing and examining patients of all ages, diagnosing and treating disorders and educating and counseling patients and families through participation in these activities while under the supervision of an experienced clinician practicing family medicine. The course will also include assigned readings and exercises. Prerequisites: Admission to Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 430. Development, Performance and Intervention II (3, 4). 4 credits. Offered spring.

This course provides an in-depth examination of conditions impeding occupational performance during adult and geriatric periods. Analysis of appropriate assessment and intervention strategies to be used to address functional deficits will occur. An exploration of theory, treatment planning, uniform terminology, documentation and partnerships with other professionals will be provided. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of previous concentration course work.

 

HTH 432. Health, Wellness and Alternative Therapeutic Approaches (1, 3). 2 credits. Offered spring.

This course will provide instruction and practical application as to how health promotion, disease prevention and alternative therapeutic techniques can be integrated into practice. Occupational Therapy theory and literature regarding health, wellness and disease prevention will be explored. Myofascial release, cranial-sacral therapy, Feldenkrais and other contemporary approaches will be examined. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of previous concentration course work.

 

HTH 434. Level One Fieldwork II. 1 credit. Offered spring.

This course provides a contextual setting for the application of skills and information gained from didactic course work. Participants will have the opportunity to design and implement courses of intervention under close supervision in a human services setting. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of previous concentration course work.

 

HTH 436. Seminar in Community Based Practice. 3 credits. Offered spring.

As a result of current emphasis on health promotion and prevention, it is important for the occupational therapist to be cognizant of community resources and how they serve the needs of individuals with disabilities. This course will expose the student to community based models and provide practicum experiences in a local agency. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of previous concentration course work.

 

HTH 438. Administrative Functions in Occupational Therapy. 2 credits. Offered spring.

This course examines the roles and responsibilities of the occupational therapist in administration and management in a variety of service areas. The aspects of budgeting, staffing, program development, productivity, recruitment, ethics, utilization of OT personnel, program evaluation and working with other disciplines will be explored. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of previous concentration course work.

 

HTH 440. Preaffiliation Seminar (2, 8). 4 credits. Offered fall.

This course will provide final intensive preparation of the student for Level Two Fieldwork, which will begin the same semester. Continued examination of professionalism, clinical skills, critical thinking, administration, ethics, research and fieldwork performance evaluation will be provided. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of previous concentration course work.

 

HTH 441/KIN 407. Rehabilitative Biomechanics. 3 credits. Offered fall.

This course is designed to introduce the student to a variety of biomechanical concepts and applications as related to the health professions. Specific attention will be given to the biomechanical aspects of the musculoskeletal system. Prerequisite: BIO 290.

 

HTH 442. Chronic Diseases. 3 credits. Offered fall.

This course examines the pathophysiological effects of chronic diseases on health and well-being. Discussions include various strategies which improve the functional status and health of individuals at risk. Prerequisite: HTH 302.

 

HTH 444. Level Two Fieldwork I. 8 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Organized and designed by the university and fieldwork site, this course offers the opportunity for the student to participate in a variety of experiences to develop entry-level competence. Areas of assessment, planning, intervention, problem solving, administration, supervision of personnel and professional responsibilities will be intensively addressed. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of previous concentration course work. Level Two Fieldwork must be completed within 24 months of completion of didactic course work.

 

HTH 446. Level Two Fieldwork II. 8 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Organized and designed by the university and fieldwork site, this course offers the opportunity for the student to participate in a variety of experiences to develop entry-level competence. Areas of assessment, planning, intervention, problem solving, administration, supervision of personnel and professional responsibilities will be intensively addressed. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of previous concentration course work. Level Two Fieldwork must be completed within 24 months of completion of didactic course work.

 

HTH 448. Postaffiliation Seminar. 4 credits. Offered spring.

This course will focus on dissemination of student experiences from recently completed Level Two Fieldwork. Analysis of professional development through review of actual case studies involving clinical competency, critical thinking, interdisciplinary processes, administration, ethics and research. Orientation to the national certification exam and state registration requirements will be reviewed. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of previous concentration course work or permission of the instructor.

 

HTH 450. Epidemiology. 3 credits. Offered spring.

A study of the causation and prevention of the major diseases that affect the quality of an individual's life. Practical skills utilized by practicing epidemiologists are emphasized.

 

HTH 451. Health Behavior Change. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Factors which influence health behavior and characteristics of these individuals and groups. Analysis of previous programs designed to change these behaviors and the formulation of new health modification programs included. Prerequisite: Senior standing required or permission of the instructor.

 

HTH 454. Internships in Health Organizations. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Full-time directed field experience in a health organization. Opportunity provided to work in an appropriate setting. Student furnishes off-campus living and traveling expenses. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and a 2.5 grade point average.

 

HTH 458. Health Program Planning and Evaluation (2, 2). 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This lecture and laboratory course introduces students to principles and the techniques employed to plan, implement and evaluate health promotion programs. Students will conduct a campus-wide event and write a grant proposal. Prerequisite: HTH 451 or admission to the Health Services Administration Program.

 

HTH/SEED 470. Clinical Techniques - Health Education Methods. 4 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Specific techniques and methods for students in health sciences. Competencies to be developed will include daily and unit planning, instructional methods, evaluation of student learning, micro-teaching experiences and others. Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education.

 

HTH 471. Health Aspects of Gerontology. 3 credits. Offered fall.

Promotion of health in the aged; physiological aspects of the aging process; community, state and federal health programs and services for the aged.

 

HTH 472. Family Life Education for Teachers. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course will present an overview of issues affecting the sexual health of children and youth. A variety of Family Life Education curricula will be discussed, however, the approved Virginia Department of Education curriculum will be examined and students will be trained in implementing and evaluating its various modules.

 

HTH 480. Health Assessment Techniques. 3 credits. Offered fall.

Examination of health risk appraisals and metabolic assessments used to implement strategies for behavioral change and improved overall wellness. Other topics include programming and group dynamics used to promote healthy lifestyle behaviors.

 

HTH 481. Behavioral Medicine Clinical Rotation. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.

During this four-week clinical rotation the student gains knowledge, experience and skill in interviewing and examining patients, diagnosing and treating disorders and educating and counseling patients and family members through participation in these activities while under the supervision of an experienced clinician practicing behavioral medicine. The course will also include assigned readings and exercises. Prerequisites: Admission to the Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 482. Advanced Health Assessment Techniques. 3 credits. Offered spring.

Skill acquisition of current health assessment techniques. These assessments are used to determine risk factors which play a role in heart disease, selected chronic diseases and to evaluate current health status. Prerequisite: HTH 480.

 

HTH 483. Surgery Clinical Rotation. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.

During this four-week clinical rotation the student gains knowledge, experience and skill in interviewing and examining patients, diagnosing and treating disorders and educating and counseling children and patients through participation in these activities while under the supervision of an experienced clinician practicing surgery. The course will also include assigned readings and exercises. Prerequisites: Admission to the Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 485. Emergency Medicine Clinical Rotation. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.

During this four-week clinical rotation the student gains knowledge, experience and skill in interviewing and examining patients, diagnosing and treating disorders and educating and counseling patients and family members through participation in these activities while under the supervision of an experienced clinician practicing emergency medicine. The course will also include assigned readings and exercises. Prerequisites: Admission to the Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 487. Elective Clinical Rotation I. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This four-week rotation is devoted to an area of study of the student's choosing and the faculty's approval. It might be additional time in a specialty already introduced through another rotation, a different medical specialty of interest or a non-clinical area associated with the PA profession such as education, professional practice issues, etc. The course will also include assigned readings and exercises. Prerequisites: Admission to the Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous courses in the concentration or permission of the program director.

 

HTH 489. Elective Clinical Rotation II. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This four-week rotation is devoted to an area of study selected by the student from a menu of options offered by the PA program. The purpose is to provide the student with experience with a broader social context for PA practice. Options might include experience with patient populations of various cultural or socioeconomic backgrounds, inner city or rural medically underserved populations or multicultural or interdisciplinary team practices. The course will also include assigned readings and exercises. Prerequisites: Admission to the Physician Assistant concentration and successful completion of all previous course in the concentration or permission of the instructor.

 

HTH 490. Special Studies in Health Education. 1-3 credits each semester. Offered fall and spring.

Designed to give the superior student in health education an opportunity to complete independent study and/or research under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of the department head.

 

HTH 499. Honors. 6 credits. Year course. Offered fall and spring.

Health Services Administration

Department of Health Sciences

HSA 358. Health Administration. 3 credits. Offered fall.

This course provides an introduction to management functions, tasks and roles as they are carried out in health services organizations. Discussion of emerging issues affecting the management of health services organizations is provided. This course uses the case method of analysis to develop critical thinking skills. Prerequisite: HTH 354 or permission of the instructor.

 

HSA 360. Health Care Marketing. 3 credits. Offered spring.

This course introduces the role, functions and tasks of health care marketing. Attention is devoted to understanding basic marketing principles; using oral, written and visual electronic communications media; and developing marketing plans for health care organizations.

 

HSA 363. Health Economics. 3 credits. Offered fall.

This course explains how economic forces affect the health service sector and how economic tools can be used to assess and improve health industry performance. Efficiency and equity trade-offs are considered. Prerequisite: ECON 201 or equivalent.

 

HSA 365. Values in Health Care. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course provides an overview of health ethics and health law for students majoring in health sciences. Students will address the major principles facing a health service professional in the delivery of health services. Particular attention will be paid to development of methodologies for ethical decision-making. Prerequisite: HTH 354 or permission of instructor.

 

HSA 366. Health Politics and Policy. 3 credits. Offered fall.

This course provides an introduction to the state and federal policy-making processes with a distinct focus on health policy. Emphasis will be on how health policy impacts health service organizations and the delivery of health care. Prerequisite: HTH 354 or permission of instructor.

 

HSA 367. Comparative International Health Systems. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course concentrates on various approaches used to provide public and personal health services around the world. Strengths and weaknesses of different health care systems in terms of availability, accessibility, cost effectiveness, continuity and quality of services will be considered. Prerequisite: HTH 354.

 

HSA 385. Health Services Administration Career Seminar. 1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

This course is a career development seminar for Health Services Administration students. An array of health administrators from varied health care organizations helps expand students' understanding of the health administration field. This course is designed for junior level students with an expectation of a major concentration in Health Services Administration.

 

HSA 452. Hospital Organization and Administration. 3 credits. Offered spring.

This course examines the organization and operation of community hospitals in the U.S. Specific attention is devoted to management's role in internal operations and in external relationships with the community and other stakeholders. Discussion of emerging issues affecting the management of hospitals and hospital systems is provided. Prerequisites: HTH 354 and HSA 358, or permission of the instructor.

 

HSA 454. Internship in Health Organizations. 3 credits. Offered spring.

Full-time directed field experience in a health organization. Opportunity provided to work in an appropriate setting. Student furnishes off-campus living and traveling expenses. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and a 2.5 grade point average.

 

HSA 455. Long Term Care Organization and Administration. 3 credits. Offered spring.

This course provides an in-depth examination of the organization and administration of long term care programs: nursing homes, home health services, adult daycare, assisted living and hospice. This course is recommended for students planning careers in long term care. Prerequisites: HTH 354, HSA 358 and GERN 280 or permission of the instructor.

 

HSA 456. Ambulatory Care Services: Organization and Administration. 3 credits. Offered fall.

This course provides an in-depth examination of the staffing, organization, budgeting and administration of ambulatory services including medical group practices, community and hospital-based clinics, and ambulatory surgery centers. This course is recommended for students planning administrative careers in this area with a foundation in health services administration. Prerequisite: HTH 354, HSA 358 or permission of the instructor.

 

HSA 462. Managed Care. 3 credits. Offered spring.

The growing influence of managed health care on the organization and delivery of health services in the United States is addressed in this course. Structural and operational characteristics of managed care organizations and plans, including HMOs, PPOs and other plans are explored, as are the implications of managed care plans for the management of hospitals and other health care organizations. Prerequisite: HSA 358 or permission of the instructor.

 

HSA 463. Quality Management in Health Care. 3 credits. Offered fall.

This course examines the quality management function required in diverse health care organizations. The student is exposed to definitions and standards of quality in health care, as well as to various tools used to measure, evaluate and improve quality. Emerging issues affecting the management of health care quality are discussed. Prerequisites: HTH 354 and HSA 358 or permission of the instructor.

 

HSA 464. Funding in Health Care. 3 credits. Offered spring.

General financial analysis is covered in terms of its application to health care entities. Concepts, issues and tools related to health care funding are covered. Prerequisites: CS 128, ACTG 241 and FIN 345.

Hosptiality and Tourism Management

College of Business

HTM 100. Hospitality and Tourism Management Seminar. 1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

A one-credit seminar course designed to expose students interested in hospitality and tourism management to current issues, trends, career opportunities and company profiles within the service industry.

 

HTM 250. Overview of Hospitality and Tourism Management. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Expose students to the areas of: lodging, food and beverage, tourism and entertainment management, special events and meeting planning, and club and resort management. Emphasis is on hospitality industry scope, organization, and economic impact; includes familiarization with industry terminology and individual and business contributors to the field of hospitality and tourism management.

 

HTM 251. Internship Preparation. 1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

A career search and skills development course. Special attention is given to the creation of effective resumes and business correspondence; developing and refining networking and interviewing skills; gaining practical experience in executing a job search; and developing leadership and managerial skills. Prerequisite: HTM 250.

 

HTM 261. Internship. 0 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Required 600 hours of approved hospitality and tourism work experience. P/F only. 0 credits. Must be completed prior to registering for HTM 461. All work sites must be approved. Prerequisite: HTM 251 or permission of the instructor.

 

HTM 271. Introduction to Foodservice Management. 1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

An introduction to food and beverage service procedures and techniques, and intermediate level commercial food production. Attention is given to special events management. Prerequisites: HTM 250 or permission of the instructor.

 
HTM 298. Special Studies in Hospitality and Tourism Management. 1 - 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A special studies course designed to explore areas of current topical concern in the lodging, food and beverage, travel and tourism, and entertainment industries. Course content will vary. For course content consult your adviser. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

 

HTM 330. Hotel Operations and Engineering. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Hotel operations with emphasis on the effective management of the front office, reservations, housekeeping and maintenance departments. Course includes the study of each physical system, with emphasis on safety, energy control, financial planning and design. Prerequisite: Junior HTM status and/or permission of instructor.

 

HTM 331. Hospitality Law. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.

The application of the law to the hospitality and tourism industry. The course focuses on the rights and obligations of guests, innkeepers, restauranteurs, airlines, travel agents and other hospitality professionals and sectors. The identification of potential legal problems and formulation of preventive measures to limit or prevent liability are emphasized. Current and emerging legal trends of concern to the industry are also explored. Prerequisites: HTM 250 and COB 218.

 

HTM 350. Travel and Tourism Management. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.

The scope, history and development of the travel and tourism industry is explored at the national and international levels. Special attention is given to the identification of a tourist with regard to motivation, method and impact of their travels; organizational structure of the industry; and the major tourism components. Prerequisites: HTM 250 and 271 or permission of the instructor.

 

HTM 371. Culinary Arts. 2 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An application of basic preparations; cooking methods for meat, poultry and fish; cooking methods for vegetables, potatoes, grains and legumes, pasta, and dumplings; pantry cooking and garde-manger; and menu development and plate presentation as seen by a food service professional. Prerequisite: HTM 271.

 

HTM/MKTG 386. Hospitality and Service Marketing. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Application of marketing principles to the service sector, including the hospitality industry. The course focuses on review of customer demand for and assessment of services; the employee/customer interface; services operation management; review of services marketing mix; and development of marketing plans for service organizations. Prerequisite: COB 300.

 

HTM 412. Club and Resort Management. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

An application of business concepts to the private equity club and full service resort industry. Industry cases are used to facilitate discussion of similarities and differences among private equity clubs, full service resorts, and other hospitality business in the areas of: culture, asset management, and operations. Prerequisite: Senior HTM status or instructor permission.

 

HTM 425. Hospitality Industry Management. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Identification and exploration of the information needs of the HTM manager in making policy and personnel decisions. Different philosophies and processes for locating, attracting, hiring and training a qualified staff are examined. Emphasis is placed on the work environment within the service area. Prerequisites: Senior HTM status and/or permission of the instructor.

 

HTM 431. Advanced Lodging. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A senior capstone course designed to expose students to strategic issues concerning the lodging industry on a whole. The interactive course draws upon concepts from functional disciplines (i.e. marketing, finance, accounting and operations) in the diagnosis, analysis and resolution of complex lodging situations. Prerequisites: HTM 330 and senior status.

 

HTM 434. Purchasing, Cost Controls, and Financial Management. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course applies purchasing, production and fundamentals of cost controls and financial management to the hospitality industry. Specifically it is an application of food, beverage, and labor cost controls and their deployment in an operations budget for a special event. Prerequisites: COB 300, senior HTM status and co-enrollment in HTM 470.

 

HTM 450. Special Events and Meeting Planning. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A senior capstone course is designed to explore conferences, conventions, expositions, meetings and special events as they relate to the responsibilities of a planner, selection criteria for host venues, legal and ethical issues, negotiating process, program design, budgeting, contracts, marketing, logistics and evaluation. Prerequisite: COB 300 and senior HTM status.

 

HTM 451. Entertainment Management. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A senior capstone course designed to expose students to strategic issues concerning the entertainment industry. Course content will vary. For course content consult your adviser. Prerequisite: COB 300 and senior HTM status.

 

HTM 461. Supervisory Internship. 0 credits. Offered fall and spring.

Required 400 hours of approved hospitality and tourism supervisory experience. The internship must be completed in your specific area of concentration. P/F only. Must be completed prior to registering for HTM 470. All work sites must be approved. Prerequisites: HTM 271, COB 300 and/or permission of the instructor.

 

HTM 470. Advanced Foodservice and Production Management Part I. 1 credit. Offered fall and spring.

Application of advanced food service management. The course focuses on menu development; food and beverage cost control techniques; budget development; employment scheduling; and marketing of special events. Prerequisite: COB 300 and senior HTM status.

 

HTM 471. Advanced Foodservice and Production Management Part II. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

A dynamic learning experience which requires students to perform a series of complex tasks in order to succeed. Management teams are required to plan, organize and produce a creative, fun-filled evening with high quality food and entertainment while staying within budget. Management teams are expected to supervise up to 60 student workers. Prerequisites: SOB 300, senior HTM status and HTM 470.

 

HTM 473. Beverage Management and Marketing. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

The course is designed to enhance knowledge in the identification and evaluation of beverages typically served in hospitality establishments. Special attention is given to alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages with regard to price/quality relationships; channels of distribution and marketing; trends and current issues faced by the industry; and service ethics. Prerequisites: Senior HTM status, HTM 386 and be 21 years of age at the beginnning of the semester.

 

HTM 490. Special Studies in Hospitality and Tourism Management. 1 to 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

The course is designed to give capable students in hospitality and tourism management an opportunity to complete independent study under faculty supervision. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and director prior to registration.

 

HTM 498. Special Topics. 3 credits. Offered fall and spring.

This course is designed to allow exploration of areas of current topical concern or to exploit special situations. Course content will vary. For course content consult your adviser. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

 

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