Madison Script James Madison University
College of Arts and Letters

Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Dr. Mary Lou Wylie, Head
Dr. Andrea Wiley, Assistant Head


Sociology Program Coordinator: Dr. Beth Eck

Phone: (540) 568- 6981
E-mail: eckba@jmu.ed
Web site: www.jmu.edu/sociology

Anthropology Program Coordinator: Dr. Andrea Wiley

Phone: (540) 568-6984
E-mail: wileyas@jmu.edu
Web site: www.jmu.edu/sociology/anthrop.htm


Professors
T. Carter, C. Geier, J. Steele, R. Thompson, M. Wylie

Associate Professors
W. Boyer, B. Eck, N. Imani, L. Lewis, M. Plass, A. Wiley

Assistant Professors
J. Coffman, G. Linder, J. Spear

Adjunct Assistant Professors
L. Lewis, C. Nash, M. Reeves, L. Zarrugh


Sociology Program

Mission Statement
The primary goal of the sociology program is to develop studentsÕ understanding of
  • The theories that explain, interpret and critique patterns of social relations.
  • The usefulness of viewing oneself and others in the social and historical context of diverse locations and cultures.
  • The varied and contested nature of all views of the social world.
  • The current techniques used in the study of the social components of such forms as philosophy, science, technology, education, work and media.
  • The importance to scientific inquiry of honesty, introspection, logical consistency and openness to refutation.
This primary goal is accomplished by a curriculum organized around three sociological traditions (naturalistic, interpretive and critical paradigms), each providing different theoretical and methodological perspectives.


Goals
To fulfill its mission, the sociology program is committed to the cultivation of the sociological imagination by developing students' appreciation of

The social component of all dimensions of human experience.
  • Diversity and alternatives in social orientations and practices within and across societies.
  • The importance of social science to social policy decisions; political, social and cultural activity and personal growth.
To instruct with regard to schools of thought and methodological skills within the sociological tradition by enhancing students'
  • Understanding of the major strands of sociological thought.
  • Ability to place the development and practice of sociology within a social and historical context.
  • Understanding of the logic of sociology's various methodological skills.
  • Skills in the application of sociological methods.

To nourish disciplined, creative and spontaneous participation in the sociological endeavor by cultivating
  • The norms of the scholarly community and a democratic society (openness to testing, reinterpretation and refutation, openness to public scrutiny, collegiality).
  • The scholarly traits necessary to practice sociology (objectivity, value clarity, skill development, perceptiveness, creativity, logical consistency, hard work and discipline).
  • Receptivity to the emergent qualities produced by creative and spontaneous sociological reflection.



Career Opportunities and Marketable Skills
Working as a professional sociologist most often requires a graduate degree, but the following careers, some supplemented with collateral training, are representative of our previous graduates.
  • Criminologist, probation/parole officer, police officer, corrections officer
  • Teacher, professor, social worker, researcher, case manager, biostatistician
  • Admissions officer, demographer, data analyst, personnel interviewer
  • Nursing home director, hospice coordinator, day care provider/director, epidemiologist
  • Mediator, congressional aide, writer/author, advocacy worker, job analyst
  • Population specialist, management trainee, sociologist, market research analyst
  • Secret service agent, customs/immigration officer, labor relations specialist
  • Personnel administrator, public relations specialist, public health statistician
  • Urban/regional planner, race relations specialist, underwriter, fund raiser
  • Education specialist, community services director
A major in sociology provides skills and perspectives that enhance all careers. Students who study sociology gain
  • Increased general knowledge.
  • Broadened viewpoints informed by sociological perspectives.
  • Sensitivity to organizational issues and social change.
  • Abilities in critical thinking, analysis, writing and communication, examination of attitudes and values, and enhancement of computer skills.



Co-curricular Activities and Organizations
  • Alpha Kappa Delta, the Sociological Honorary Society
  • Student Research Symposium
  • The Sociology Club



Degree and Major Requirements

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology

Degree Requirements

Credit Hours
General Education1 41
Foreign Language classes (Intermediate level required)2 0-14
Philosophy course (In addition to General Education courses) 3
University electives 23-27
Major requirements (listed below) and electives 39

120


1 The General Education program contains a set of requirements each student must fulfill. The number of credit hours necessary to fulfill these requirements may vary. 2 The foreign language requirement may be satisfied by successful completion of the second semester of the intermediate level of the student's chosen language (typically 232), or by placing out of that language through the Department of Foreign Language's placement test.

Major Requirements
To earn the B.A. degree with a sociology major, students must complete a minimum of 39 credit hours in sociology. Of these credit hours, 21 are required courses; the remaining 18 credit hours are electives chosen from over 30 sociology courses.
Core Corses Credit Hours
SOCI 200. Development of Social Thought and Method 4
SOCI 201. Sociology Proseminar 3
SOCI 331. Introduction to Sociological Analysis 1 3
SOCI 380. Critical Analysis 3
SOCI 382. Interpretive Analysis 3
SOCI 384. Naturalistic Analysis 3
SOCI 480. Senior Seminar2 3
Sociology electives 18

39

1 Students can substitute SOCI 331 with MATH 220, PSYC 210 or COB 191, if SPSS is used in the course, but must take an additional sociology course to complete the required 39 hours of sociology. 2 This course fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major.

Bachelor of Science in Sociology

Degree Requirements

Credit Hours
General Education1 41
Mathematics course2 3
Social science or natural science course2 3-4
University electives 39
Major requirements (listed below) 33-34

120


1 The General Education program contains a set of requirements each student must fulfill. The number of credit hours necessary to fulfill these requirements may vary. 2 In addition to course work taken to fulfill General Education requirement.

Major Requirements
To earn the B.S. degree with a sociology major, students must complete a minimum of 39 credit hours in sociology. Of these credit hours, 21 are required courses; the remaining 18 credit hours are electives chosen from over 30 sociology courses.
Core Corses Credit Hours
SOCI 200. Development of Social Thought and Method 4
SOCI 201. Sociology Proseminar 3
SOCI 331. Introduction to Sociological Analysis 1 3
SOCI 380. Critical Analysis 3
SOCI 382. Interpretive Analysis 3
SOCI 384. Naturalistic Analysis 3
SOCI 480. Senior Seminar2 3
Sociology electives 18

39

1 Students can substitute SOCI 331 with MATH 220, PSYC 210 or COB 191, if SPSS is used in the course, but must take an additional sociology course to complete the required 39 hours of sociology. 2 This course fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major.

Concentrations
The sociology program encourages majors to select electives that create a coherent program of study suited to their special needs and interests. Such a focus would involve four or more courses that share a common focus. With the assistance of his or her sociology adviser, a student may choose an appropriate set of classes to form a concentration. Students in the past have developed such focused inquiries in areas such as applied sociology, deviance and criminology, family and lifestyles, occupations and bureaucracy, social psychology, sociology of education, and multicultural experience.


Recommended Schedule for Majors
The following is an example of a four-year course of study for a student seeking a degree in sociology:
First Year Credit Hours
SOCI 101. Introductory Sociology, or GSOCI 210. Social Issues in a Global Context, or GSOCI 240. Individual in Society (prerequisite for SOCI 200) 3
SOCI 200. Development of Social Thought and Method 4
SOCI 201. Sociology Proseminar 2

9

Second Year Credit Hours
SOCI 331. Introduction to Sociological Analysis 3
Sociology Electives 6

9


Third Year Credit Hours
Choose two of the following: 6
SOCI 380. Critical Analysis
SOCI 382. Interpretive Analysis
SOCI 384. Naturalistic Analysis
Electives 6
3

12

Fourth Year Credit Hours
Choose one of the following: 3
SOCI 380. Critical Analysis
SOCI 382. Interpretive Analysis
SOCI 384. Naturalistic Analysis
Sociology Electives 3 3
SOCI 480. Senior Seminar (majors take this during their final semester at JMU) 3

9




Minor Requirements

Sociology Minor
To minor in sociology, a student must complete a minimum of 18 credit hours of sociology course work including 6 core credit hours and 12 elective credit hours.
Required Course Credit Hours
SOCI 200. Development of Social Thought and Method 4
SOCI 201. Sociology Proseminar 2
Sociology electives 12

18

Credit by Examination
Consult the department head for information about credit by examination.


Anthropology Program

Mission Statement
As the discipline that studies humans as both biological and cultural beings through time and across place, anthropology takes a holistic approach that bridges the natural and social sciences and the humanities. The anthropology program provides students with an excellent undergraduate education in the major subfields of anthropology: biological anthropology, cultural anthropology and archaeology. This education seeks to introduce and explain the nature and diversity of human biology and culture as it is currently understood. The anthropology major provides globally oriented courses that stress critical thinking, cultural and scientific interpretation, intensive reading and rigorous writing and the application of learning and research technologies used by anthropologists to understand contemporary human problems.


Goals
To fulfill its mission, the anthropology program is committed to the following goals:
  • To provide students with the fundamentals of evolutionary theory, the fossil and genetic evidence for human evolution and the relevance of human biology for understanding contemporary human populations, biological variation and disease.
  • To enhance students' understanding of culture and different cultural systems, their social organization and the methodological and theoretical basis for interpreting human cultural differences and similarities.
  • To develop students' understanding of the cultural origins and development of humans by analyzing the material remains (artifacts) of prehistoric and historic cultures.
Career Opportunities and Marketable Skills
Working as a professional anthropologist usually requires at least a graduate degree. An undergraduate degree in anthropology, however, provides a solid foundation from which to purse a career. JMU graduates with a degree in anthropology have secured the following positions:
  • Anthropologist
  • Archaeologist
  • Archivist
  • Business executive
  • City planner
  • College librarian
  • Cultural affairs director
  • Genealogist
  • Historical preservationist
  • International development consultant
  • Lawyer
  • Management trainee
  • Market researcher
  • Museum curator
  • News reporter
  • Paralegal
  • Public affairs director
  • Teacher
  • Technical writer
The anthropology major is a liberal arts program that stresses marketable skills such as
  • Basic research analytical skills
  • Computer skills
  • Critical thinking
  • Global knowledge
  • Rigorous writing


Co-curricular Activities and Organizations
  • Student Anthropology Club


Degree and Major Requirements

Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology

Degree Requirements

Credit Hours
General Education1 41
Foreign Language classes (Intermediate level required)2 0-14
Philosophy course (In addition to General Education courses) 3
University electives 25-39
Major requirements (listed below) and electives 37



1 The General Education program contains a set of requirements each student must fulfill. The number of credit hours necessary to fulfill these requirements may vary. 2 The foreign language requirement may be satisfied by successful completion of the second semester of the intermediate level of the studentÕs chosen language (typically 232), or by placing out of that language through the Department of Foreign LanguageÕs placement test.

Major Requirements
To earn a B.A. degree with a major in anthropology, students must complete a minimum of 37 credit hours in anthropology. Of these credit hours, 19 are core requirements; the remaining 18 credit hours are electives. A maximum of 6 credit hours of electives may be from a discipline outside of anthropology (e.g., history, philosophy, sociology, economics, geology, biology, etc.). Elective courses from outside disciplines must be 300- or 400-level courses and/or approved by the studentÕs adviser. No course grade lower than C- may be applied to the anthropology major.
Core Corses Credit Hours
GANTH 195. Cultural Anthropology 3
ANTH 196. Biological Anthropology or GSCI 116E. Human Ecology 3
ANTH 197. Archaeology 3
ANTH 375. History of Theory in Sociocultural Anthropology 3
ANTH 435. Ethnographic Genres and Methods1 4
ANTH 455. Archaeology: Methods of Analysis or a methods/statistics course approved by adviser 3
Anthropology electives 12
Approved electives (either anthropology courses or those from other disciplines) 6

37

1 This course fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major.

Bachelor of Science in Anthropology

Degree Requirements

Credit Hours
Credit Hours
General Education1 41
Mathematics course2 3
Social science or natural science course2 3-4
University electives 35-36
Major requirements (listed below) 37



1 The General Education program contains a set of requirements each student must fulfill. The number of credit hours necessary to fulfill these requirements may vary. 2 In addition to course work taken to fulfill General Education requirement.

Major Requirements
To earn a B.S. degree with a major in anthropology, students must complete a minimum of 37 credit hours in anthropology. Of these credit hours, 19 are core requirements; the remaining 18 credit hours are electives. A maximum of 6 credit hours of electives may be from a discipline outside of anthropology (e.g., history, philosophy, sociology, economics, geology, biology, etc.). Elective courses from outside disciplines must be 300- or 400-level courses and/or approved by the studentÕs adviser. No course grade lower than C- may be applied to the anthropology major.
Core Corses Credit Hours
GANTH 195. Cultural Anthropology 3
ANTH 196. Biological Anthropology or GSCI 116E. Human Ecology 3
ANTH 197. Archaeology 3
ANTH 375. History of Theory in Sociocultural Anthropology 3
ANTH 435. Ethnographic Genres and Methods1 4
ANTH 455. Archaeology: Methods of Analysis or a methods/statistics course approved by adviser 3
Anthropology electives 12
Approved electives (either anthropology courses or those from other disciplines) 6

30

1 This course fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major.

Concentrations
The anthropology program encourages but does not require majors to choose from one of three areas of concentration. Each concentration is tied to one of the three sub-disciplines of anthropology taught at JMU and is designed to allow students to design a curriculum most appropriate to their interests. Each concentration consists of four or more courses from anthropology and other disciplines which share a common focus. Because of the range of opportunities within each concentration, it is important that students consult with their advisers to choose courses that suit their particular needs and interests. The anthropology concentrations are:

Archaeology
Archaeology involves the study of the development and change of human society from its prehistoric past to the present through the identification, gathering and interpretation of material remains or artifacts. Students taking this concentration should select ANTH 455 Archaeology: Methods of Analysis. Upper level courses appropriate to this concentration include ANTH 327 Ancient North American Civilizations and ANTH 325 Aztec, Maya and their Predecessors, among others. Students planning a career in archaeology should strongly consider taking an archaeological field school. This sub-discipline shares strong methodological and thematic ties to history, geology, geography, biology and art history, and upper level course electives from these areas are encouraged.

Biological Anthropology
This sub-discipline seeks to understand the biological nature of humans and biological variation in human populations by studying evolutionary theory, genetics, human biology, non-human primates and the fossil record for human evolution. The concentration allows students to focus on human biology, and behavior from a perspective that considers the ways that culture and environment impact on biological processes.

Students interested in this concentration should select from topics courses such as ANTH 300 Anthropology of Diet and Nutrition; ANTH 315 Human Evolution; ANTH 352 Birth, Death and Sex: Exploring Demography and ANTH 360 Medical Anthropology. Relevant courses in biology, psychology, geology, health and statistics should be considered.

Cultural Anthropology
Cultural anthropology provides students with an in-depth experience in the interpretation and comparison of human cultures, and it is closely linked to the humanities and the social sciences. The goal of this concentration is to provide students with knowledge of culture and different culture systems, their organization into various systems of social organization and the methodological and theoretical basis for interpreting human cultural differences and similarities. Students are encouraged to become proficient in a foreign language and develop a regional area of specialization (e.g., North America, Latin America, Asia, etc.). Also recommended are upper level electives in history, sociology, economics, religion and political science.

Minor Requirements

Anthropology Minor
Students complete a minor in anthropology by completing 18 hours in anthropology including the core courses GANTH 195 Cultural Anthropology, ANTH 196 Biological Anthropology or GSCI 116E Human Ecology, and ANTH 197 Archaeology.

Historical Archaeology Minor
The minor is designed for students interested in the field of historical archaeology, a discipline that integrates the research interests and methods of archaeology and history. For a full description of this program, refer to "Historical Archaeology."

Credit by Examination
For information about credit by examination, consult the program coordinator.



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